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Survival: Why Me? (PDF)

by Pete Guppy

Ideal to engage reluctant and struggling readers aged 13-16. 'The Gang saw him run, and gave a cheer. Showing fear was just what they wanted to see. It fed their hunger for power.' When Wayne starts a new school life is made hell by a group of bullies. Will they beat his down, or can he fight back? The Survival series of edgy fiction for teenagers aged 13 to 16+, offers an extended read at a low readability level perfect for reluctant and struggling readers. Each of the stories cover important and topical issues such as bullying, drugs and binge drinking, where the characters have to face the consequences of their own actions and learn to go it alone to survive. The series has been written by Pete Guppy, an experienced Special Needs adviser and teacher.

Survival: Fireproof (PDF)

by Pete Guppy

'Survival' is a range of edgy fiction aimed at older pupils with a low reading age, particularly boys. Each story features mostly male characters and uses simple, crisp language to keep readers engaged.

Survival Analysis

by Shenyang Guo

The Survival Guide to Journalism (UK Higher Education OUP Humanities & Social Sciences Media, Film & Cultural Studies)

by Dan Synge

"This is brilliant! A must-read for anyone thinking about going into journalism or already there. The recurring Q&A style is really helpful - the author really did pre-empt all my various questions. As someone who is deciding whether to go into journalism or not - this is the only book I have come across so far which has actually been helpful and fun to read at the same time. What I liked best is that the book is fun without being patronising - a lot of journo books are stuffy, outdated or intimidating. Importantly it tackles all the current issues about journalism becoming multi-platform, with advice on blogging etc.And although encouraging, it is realistic enough to make sure you don't see journalism through rose-tinted glasses - it really made me think hard about whether I would survive as a journalist. I would definitely recommend this to anyone thinking of starting out or starting out in journalism - it's essentially a journalism course in a nutshell!" Katherine Lough"The best bit about this book, as opposed to others about journalism (of which there are many), is that it is written in a friendly and non-intimidating style. As a journalism student I have spent many hours poring over books that judge me for wanting to write about the 'soft stuff', whereas Synge actually gives tips on how to break into celebrity gossip or arts reviewing. The advice sections from real working journalists in different sectors and publications are really helpful, as they give a (realistic!) insight into the profession and hold up all the best bits, while conveying the disadvantages to life as a scribe. Synge's tips and hints are relevant, especially the bits about online journalism and how journalists have to be multi-skilled today. What I found most interesting was the chapters on freelancing ... Overall, I would recommend this book to anyone hoping to be a journalist, studying to be a journalist or working as a journalist."H StuartThis essential survival manual to print and online media journalism explores the personal qualities and skills needed to break into this exciting but often uncertain field. It considers the current state of expanding media, routes into the industry, and the pros and cons of being a staff journalist or freelance. Helpful coverage includes:Practical hands-on advice on news and feature writing plus specialist areas such as profile writing, reviewing and blogging Useful tips and advice from top working professionalsUp-to-date information on where the best opportunities areExercises, easy-to-follow checklists and short Q&A sessionsThe author draws on his own extensive experience in the field and suggests useful links to organisations that specialise in helping aspiring journalists to survive through those difficult first months and years.The Survival Guide to Journalism is an essential reference for any aspiring journalist. It will be key reading for journalism students and anyone interested in making a living through their writing and editorial skills.

Survival Media: The Politics and Poetics of Mobility and the War in Sri Lanka (Mobility & Politics)

by S. Perera

Through the narratives and movements of survivors of the war in Lanka these interconnected essays develop the concept of 'survival media' as embodied and expressive forms of mobility across borders.

Survivance, Sovereignty, and Story: Teaching American Indian Rhetorics

by Lisa King Rose Gubele Joyce Rain Anderson

Focusing on the importance of discussions about sovereignty and of the diversity of Native American communities, Survivance, Sovereignty, and Story offers a variety of ways to teach and write about indigenous North American rhetorics. These essays introduce indigenous rhetorics, framing both how and why they should be taught in US university writing classrooms. Contributors promote understanding of American Indian rhetorical and literary texts and the cultures and contexts within which those texts are produced. Chapters also supply resources for instructors, promote cultural awareness, offer suggestions for further research, and provide examples of methods to incorporate American Indian texts into the classroom curriculum. Survivance, Sovereignty, and Story provides a decolonized vision of what teaching rhetoric and writing can be and offers a foundation to talk about what rhetoric and pedagogical practice can mean when examined through American Indian and indigenous epistemologies and contemporary rhetorics. Contributors include Joyce Rain Anderson, Resa Crane Bizzaro, Qwo-Li Driskill, Janice Gould, Rose Gubele, Angela Haas, Jessica Safran Hoover, Lisa King, Kimberli Lee, Malea D. Powell, Andrea Riley-Mukavetz, Gabriela Raquel Ríos, and Sundy Watanabe.

Surviving in Violent Conflicts: Chinese Interpreters in the Second Sino-Japanese War 1931–1945 (Palgrave Studies in Languages at War)

by Ting Guo

This book examines the relatively little-known history of interpreting in the Second Sino-Japanese War (1931-45). Chapters within explore how Chinese interpreters were trained and deployed as an important military and political asset by competing domestic and international powers, including the Chinese Nationalist Government (Kuomingtang), the Chinese Communist Party and Japanese forces. Drawing from a wide range of sources, including archives in mainland China and Taiwan, memoirs and interviews with former military interpreters, it discusses how the interpreting profession was affected by shifts of foreign policy and how interpreters’ professional habitus was formed through their training and interaction with other social agents and institutions. By investigating individual interpreters’ career development and border-crossing strategies, it questions the assumption of interpreting as an exclusive profession and highlights interpreters’ active position-taking as a strategy of self-protection, a route to power, or just a chance of a better life.

Surviving Your Academic Job Hunt: Advice for Humanities PhDs

by K. Hume

This book is a guide to securing an academic post in the humanities in a US University. It includes best-practice examples of application documents and shows how to work up answers to the questions posed in phone, conference, and campus interviews. Readers will also learn about bargaining for subsidies and start-up packages. The book can be used by Careers Officers to train students, or by job hunters training themselves. This short, lively read gives practical, solid advice which will help candidates to transform their mindset from student to faculty.

Susan Glaspell: Her Life and Times

by Linda Ben-Zvi

"Venturesome feminist," historian Nancy Cott's term, perfectly describes Susan Glaspell (1876-1948), America's first important modern female playwright, winner of the 1931 Pulitzer Prize for drama, and one of the most respected novelists and short story writers of her time. In her life she explored uncharted regions and in her writing she created intrepid female characters who did the same. Born in Davenport, Iowa, just as America entered its second century, Glaspell took her cue from her pioneering grandparents as she sought to rekindle their spirit of adventure and purpose. A journalist by age eighteen, she worked her way through university as a reporter. In 1913 she and her husband, fellow Davenport iconoclast George Cram "Jig" Cook, joined the migration of writers from the Midwest to Greenwich Village, and were at the center of the first American avant-garde. Glaspell was a charter member of its important institutions--the Provincetown Players, the Liberal Club, Heterodoxy--and a close friend of John Reed, Mary Heaton Vorse, Max Eastman, Sinclair Lewis, and Eugene O'Neill. Her plays launched an indigenous American drama and addressed pressing topics such as women's suffrage, birth control, female sexuality, marriage equality, socialism, and pacifism. Although frail and ethereal, Glaspell was a determined rebel throughout her life, willing to speak out for those causes in which she believed and willing to risk societal approbation when she found love. At the age of thirty-five, she scandalized staid Davenport when she began an affair with then-married Jig Cook. After his death in Delphi, where they lived for two years, she began an eight-year relationship with a man seventeen years her junior. Youthful in appearance, she remained youthful and undaunted in spirit. "Out there--lies all that's not been touched--lies life that waits," Claire Archer says in The Verge, Glaspell's most experimental play. The biography of Susan Glaspell is the exciting story of her personal exploration of the same terrain.

Susan Glaspell in Context: American Theater, Culture, and Politics, 1915-48 (Theater: Theory/text/performance Ser.)

by J. Ellen Gainor

Susan Glaspell in Context not only discusses the dramatic work of this key American author -- perhaps best known for her short story "A Jury of Her Peers" and its dramatic counterpart, Trifles -- but also places it within the theatrical, cultural, political, social, historical, and biographical climates in which Glaspell's dramas were created: the worlds of Greenwich Village and Provincetown bohemia, of the American frontier, and of American modernism. J. Ellen Gainor is Professor of Theatre, Women's Studies, and American Studies, Cornell University. Her other books include Performing America: Cultural Nationalism in American Theater (co-edited with Jeffrey D. Mason) from the University of Michigan Press.

Susan Glaspell's Century of American Women: A Critical Interpretation of Her Work

by Veronica Makowsky

Tracing the evolution of Susan Glaspell's writing, Veronica Makowsky provides fascinating glimpses of the life of a woman who broke the barriers against female journalists, advocated socialism, struggled with the precepts of Greenwich Village free love, was one of the founders of the Provincetown Players, participated in the sessions of the feminist Heterodoxy Club, placed women's concerns on the stage as a playwright and actress, and wrote about a turbulent century of American women with courage, optimism, sensitivity, and love. This is the first full-length book about Glaspell's works, including the fiction and lifewriting that bracketed her relatively brief career as the playwright best-known for the one-act drama Trifles. Also the author of many other plays, including the Pulitzer prize-winning Alison's House, a number of collected and uncollected short stories, nine novels, and a biography of her husband the iconoclastic George Cram Cook, Glaspell was an artist of formidable, but ill-acknowledged talent. Makowsky places Glaspell's work in its biographical and cultural context, with particular attention to Glaspell's depiction of women's roles over a century of American history. In addition, she examines closely Glaspell's use of the maternal metaphor and her depiction of women in the role of mothers. This absorbing and revelatory study rescues one of America's literary "foremothers" from relative obscurity, challenging canonical ideas about the circumstances that lead to literary "greatness."

Susan Hill: The Essential Guide (Vintage Living Texts #13)

by Jonathan Noakes Margaret Reynolds

The Woman in Black, Strange Meeting, I'm the King of the Castle, A Little Bit of Singing and DancingIn Vintage Living Texts, teachers and students will find the essential guide to the works of Susan Hill. Vintage Living Texts is unique in that it offers an in-depth interview with Susan Hill, relating specifically to the texts under discussion. This guide deals with Hill's themes, genre and narrative technique, and a close reading of the texts will provide a rich source of ideas for intelligent and inventive ways of approaching the novels. Also included in this guide are detailed reading plans for all three novels, questions for essays and discussion, contextual material, suggested texts for complementary and comparative reading, extracts from reviews, a critical overview, a biography, bibliography and a glossary of literary terms.

Susan Sontag: An Annotated Bibliography 1948-1992 (Modern Critics And Critical Studies)

by LELAND POAGUE; KATHY A. PARSONS

Susan Sontag: An Annotated Bibliography catalogues the works of one of America's most prolific and important 20th century authors. Known for her philosophical writings on American culture, topics left untouched by Sontag's writings are few and far between. This volume is an exhaustive collection that includes her novels, essays, reviews, films and interviews. Each entry is accompanied by an annotated bibliography.

Susan Sontag: An Annotated Bibliography 1948-1992 (Modern Critics and Critical Studies)

by Leland Poague Kathy A. Parsons

Susan Sontag: An Annotated Bibliographycatalogues the works of one of America's most prolific and important 20th century authors. Known for her philosophical writings on American culture, topics left untouched by Sontag's writings are few and far between. This volume is an exhaustive collection that includes her novels, essays, reviews, films and interviews. Each entry is accompanied by an annotated bibliography.

Susan Sontag: An Annotated Bibliography 1948-1992 (Modern Critics and Critical Studies)

by Leland Poague Kathy A. Parsons

Susan Sontag: An Annotated Bibliographycatalogues the works of one of America's most prolific and important 20th century authors. Known for her philosophical writings on American culture, topics left untouched by Sontag's writings are few and far between. This volume is an exhaustive collection that includes her novels, essays, reviews, films and interviews. Each entry is accompanied by an annotated bibliography.

Susan Sontag: An Annotated Bibliography 1948-1992

by Leland Poague Kathy A. Parsons

Susan Sontag: An Annotated Bibliography catalogues the works of one of America's most prolific and important 20th century authors. Known for her philosophical writings on American culture, topics left untouched by Sontag's writings are few and far between. This volume is an exhaustive collection that includes her novels, essays, reviews, films and interviews. Each entry is accompanied by an annotated bibliography.

Susan Sontag: The Elegiac Modernist (Routledge Revivals)

by Sohnya Sayres

First published in 1990, this is the first book-length study of Susan Sontag: essayist and analyst of culture, author of ‘Notes on Camp’ and Illness as Metaphor, novelist, reviewer, and filmmaker. It was modernism, and the excitement it created in her, that "rescued" Sontag from childhood in Southern California and sent her abroad in the 1950s. Sohnya Sayres looks into the foundations and directions of Sontag’s imposing work and in doing so discovers a unity of design and subject that Sontag has only recently acknowledged to have been an ambition all along. Sayres’s Sontag is the "elegiac modernist", committed to a modernism whose high noon has long since passed. And yet Sayres finds in Sontag’s lifelong indebtedness to modernism’s aesthetic an inherent conservatism. While guiding us through the work of a brilliant critic, Sayres questions whether Sontag is not herself caught in the paradoxes of the modernism she herself so much admires. A comprehensive analysis of the work of a remarkable intellectual, this title will be of value to any student of American modernism and literary life.

Susan Sontag: The Elegiac Modernist (Routledge Revivals)

by Sohnya Sayres

First published in 1990, this is the first book-length study of Susan Sontag: essayist and analyst of culture, author of ‘Notes on Camp’ and Illness as Metaphor, novelist, reviewer, and filmmaker. It was modernism, and the excitement it created in her, that "rescued" Sontag from childhood in Southern California and sent her abroad in the 1950s. Sohnya Sayres looks into the foundations and directions of Sontag’s imposing work and in doing so discovers a unity of design and subject that Sontag has only recently acknowledged to have been an ambition all along. Sayres’s Sontag is the "elegiac modernist", committed to a modernism whose high noon has long since passed. And yet Sayres finds in Sontag’s lifelong indebtedness to modernism’s aesthetic an inherent conservatism. While guiding us through the work of a brilliant critic, Sayres questions whether Sontag is not herself caught in the paradoxes of the modernism she herself so much admires. A comprehensive analysis of the work of a remarkable intellectual, this title will be of value to any student of American modernism and literary life.

Susan Sontag's On Photography (The Macat Library)

by Nico Epstein

Susan Sontag’s 1997 text, On Photography, brought photographic theory into the university classroom with its staunch defence of the medium as art and inspired a new wave of Marxist Criticism in the field. Sontag explains the way in which we are addicted to images and depend on them for knowledge of our surroundings and the problems and challenges this causes. Already an established academic figure, Sontag brought Walter Benjamin’s theories in into the academic mainstream. The book retains its relevance in the everyday world because of the applicability of its ideas to the world of digital photography.

Susan Sontag's On Photography (The Macat Library)

by Nico Epstein

Susan Sontag’s 1997 text, On Photography, brought photographic theory into the university classroom with its staunch defence of the medium as art and inspired a new wave of Marxist Criticism in the field. Sontag explains the way in which we are addicted to images and depend on them for knowledge of our surroundings and the problems and challenges this causes. Already an established academic figure, Sontag brought Walter Benjamin’s theories in into the academic mainstream. The book retains its relevance in the everyday world because of the applicability of its ideas to the world of digital photography.

Susan Stebbing and the Language of Common Sense (History of Analytic Philosophy)

by S. Chapman

This first book-length study of the work and life of L. Susan Stebbing relates the development of her thought to the philosophical, social and political background of her life. It also assesses Stebbing's contribution in the light of developments both in analytic philosophy and in linguistics in the decade since her death.

Susanna Wesley: The Complete Writings

by Susanna Wesley

Susanna Wesley, long celebrated in Methodist mythology as mother of the movement's founders, now takes place as a practical theologian in her own right. This collection of her letters, spiritual diary, and longer treatises (only one of which was published in her lifetime) shows her to be more than the nurturing mother of Wesleyan legend. It also reveals her to be a well-educated woman in conversation with contemporary theological, philosophical, and literary works. Her quotations and allusions include Locke, Pascal, and Herbert, as well as a number of now forgotten theologians. In some of her work, one can distinguish doctrinal and spiritual leanings, such as Arminianism and Christian perfection, that would later find wide expression in the spread of Methodism. Further, her writings demonstrate her readiness, for conscience's sake, to stand up to the men in her life--father, husband, and sons---and the three incarnations of English Protestantism they represented: respectively, Puritanism, the Established Church, and the new Methodist movement. Tracing these incidents in her letters and diaries, a reader can begin to understand how spirituality, even an otherwise conservative one in rather restrictive times, can serve to empower the voice of women.

Susanna Wesley: The Complete Writings

by Susanna Wesley

Susanna Wesley, long celebrated in Methodist mythology as mother of the movement's founders, now takes place as a practical theologian in her own right. This collection of her letters, spiritual diary, and longer treatises (only one of which was published in her lifetime) shows her to be more than the nurturing mother of Wesleyan legend. It also reveals her to be a well-educated woman in conversation with contemporary theological, philosophical, and literary works. Her quotations and allusions include Locke, Pascal, and Herbert, as well as a number of now forgotten theologians. In some of her work, one can distinguish doctrinal and spiritual leanings, such as Arminianism and Christian perfection, that would later find wide expression in the spread of Methodism. Further, her writings demonstrate her readiness, for conscience's sake, to stand up to the men in her life--father, husband, and sons---and the three incarnations of English Protestantism they represented: respectively, Puritanism, the Established Church, and the new Methodist movement. Tracing these incidents in her letters and diaries, a reader can begin to understand how spirituality, even an otherwise conservative one in rather restrictive times, can serve to empower the voice of women.

Susanne DuVerger: Printed Writings 1500–1640: Series 1, Part One, Volume 5 (The Early Modern Englishwoman: A Facsimile Library of Essential Works & Printed Writings, 1500-1640: Series I, Part One)

by Jane Collins

The one work traditionally attributed to Susan DuVerger is her Admirable Events (1639) - a translation of a collection of novellas by Jean Pierre Camus, a French Catholic Bishop - which she dedicated to Queen Henrietta Maria. There is some evidence however to suggest that she was the author of several other works. What little is known of her is based on her literary production - various factors suggest that she was an English Catholic who spent time in exile in France during the Civil War.

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