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Cluster Development and Policy

by Philip Raines

This title was first published in 2002. Examining cluster development policy in Europe and outlining its distinctive features, this innovative text places it within the national context of regional policy-making. It also identifies the features supporting the successful development of industrial clusters and provides a clear overview of cluster theory and policy practice followed by seven key case studies on the history and operation of different cluster policies in Europe. While there has been a number of books on the theory of cluster development little research has been published on policy. By filling this gap, this book will be of interest to a policy-making audience as well as students and researchers of regional economic development throughout Europe.

Cluster Development and Policy

by Philip Raines

This title was first published in 2002. Examining cluster development policy in Europe and outlining its distinctive features, this innovative text places it within the national context of regional policy-making. It also identifies the features supporting the successful development of industrial clusters and provides a clear overview of cluster theory and policy practice followed by seven key case studies on the history and operation of different cluster policies in Europe. While there has been a number of books on the theory of cluster development little research has been published on policy. By filling this gap, this book will be of interest to a policy-making audience as well as students and researchers of regional economic development throughout Europe.

The CNN Effect: The Myth of News, Foreign Policy and Intervention

by Piers Robinson

The CNN Effect examines the relationship between the state and its media, and considers the role played by the news reporting in a series of 'humanitarian' interventions in Iraq, Somalia, Bosnia, Kosovo and Rwanda. Piers Robinson challenges traditional views of media subservience and argues that sympathetic news coverage at key moments in foreign crises can influence the response of Western governments.

The CNN Effect: The Myth of News, Foreign Policy and Intervention

by Piers Robinson

The CNN Effect examines the relationship between the state and its media, and considers the role played by the news reporting in a series of 'humanitarian' interventions in Iraq, Somalia, Bosnia, Kosovo and Rwanda. Piers Robinson challenges traditional views of media subservience and argues that sympathetic news coverage at key moments in foreign crises can influence the response of Western governments.

Colonialism and the Modern World

by Martin Bunton Gregory Blue Ralph C. Croizier Criozier, Ralph

This collection fills the need for a resource that adequately conceptualizes the place of non-European histories in the larger narrative of world history. These essays were selected with special emphasis on their comparative outlook. The chapters range from the British Empire (India, Egypt, Palestine) to Indonesia, French colonialism (Brittany and Algeria), South Africa, Fiji, and Japanese imperialism. Within the chapters, key concepts such as gender, land and law, and regimes of knowledge are considered.

Colonialism and the Modern World (Sources And Studies In World History Ser.)

by Martin Bunton Gregory Blue Ralph C. Croizier Criozier, Ralph

This collection fills the need for a resource that adequately conceptualizes the place of non-European histories in the larger narrative of world history. These essays were selected with special emphasis on their comparative outlook. The chapters range from the British Empire (India, Egypt, Palestine) to Indonesia, French colonialism (Brittany and Algeria), South Africa, Fiji, and Japanese imperialism. Within the chapters, key concepts such as gender, land and law, and regimes of knowledge are considered.

Committing to Peace: The Successful Settlement of Civil Wars (PDF)

by Barbara F. Walter

Why do some civil wars end in successfully implemented peace settlements while others are fought to the finish? Numerous competing theories address this question. Yet not until now has a study combined the historical sweep, empirical richness, and conceptual rigor necessary to put them thoroughly to the test and draw lessons invaluable to students, scholars, and policymakers. Using data on every civil war fought between 1940 and 1992, Barbara Walter details the conditions that lead combatants to partake in what she defines as a three-step process--the decision on whether to initiate negotiations, to compromise, and, finally, to implement any resulting terms. Her key finding: rarely are such conflicts resolved without active third-party intervention.Walter argues that for negotiations to succeed it is not enough for the opposing sides to resolve the underlying issues behind a civil war. Instead the combatants must clear the much higher hurdle of designing credible guarantees on the terms of agreement--something that is difficult without outside assistance. Examining conflicts from Greece to Laos, China to Columbia, Bosnia to Rwanda, Walter confirms just how crucial the prospect of third-party security guarantees and effective power-sharing pacts can be--and that adversaries do, in fact, consider such factors in deciding whether to negotiate or fight. While taking many other variables into account and acknowledging that third parties must also weigh the costs and benefits of involvement in civil war resolution, this study reveals not only how peace is possible, but probable.

Committing to Peace: The Successful Settlement of Civil Wars

by Barbara F. Walter

Why do some civil wars end in successfully implemented peace settlements while others are fought to the finish? Numerous competing theories address this question. Yet not until now has a study combined the historical sweep, empirical richness, and conceptual rigor necessary to put them thoroughly to the test and draw lessons invaluable to students, scholars, and policymakers. Using data on every civil war fought between 1940 and 1992, Barbara Walter details the conditions that lead combatants to partake in what she defines as a three-step process--the decision on whether to initiate negotiations, to compromise, and, finally, to implement any resulting terms. Her key finding: rarely are such conflicts resolved without active third-party intervention.Walter argues that for negotiations to succeed it is not enough for the opposing sides to resolve the underlying issues behind a civil war. Instead the combatants must clear the much higher hurdle of designing credible guarantees on the terms of agreement--something that is difficult without outside assistance. Examining conflicts from Greece to Laos, China to Columbia, Bosnia to Rwanda, Walter confirms just how crucial the prospect of third-party security guarantees and effective power-sharing pacts can be--and that adversaries do, in fact, consider such factors in deciding whether to negotiate or fight. While taking many other variables into account and acknowledging that third parties must also weigh the costs and benefits of involvement in civil war resolution, this study reveals not only how peace is possible, but probable.

The Communist Party of Great Britain Since 1920

by J. Eaden D. Renton

A new single volume history of the Communist Party of Great Britain examining the party from its foundations in 1920 to its demise in the early 1990s. Drawing on original research and a reading of specialist texts, the authors analyze the rise and fall of the party and evaluate its role on the left of British politics. Whilst sympathetic to the ideals and commitment of many British communist activists, the book is sharply critical of much of the actual practice of the party.

Community Health Advocacy

by Sana Loue Linda S. Lloyd Daniel J. O'Shea

This text provides a foundation for the initiation of advocacy efforts and for the evaluation of their success and includes topics such as: specific strategies, grassroots advocacy efforts, formation and development of coalitions, advocacy efforts in legislatures, administrative agencies, court, and the media. It is of interest to public and urban health workers, social workers, community organizers, and legislators.

Comparative Democratic Politics: A Guide to Contemporary Theory and Research (PDF)

by Dr Hans Keman

Democracy is the most widely used way of organizing politics in the contemporary world. Comparative Democratic Politics brings together a team of renowned international scholars to provide a comprehensive review of theory and research in this essential area of comparative study. A key aim to the book is to introduce and understand representative democracy as a political process and contemporary system of governance in need of constant attention and scrutiny. Four important themes include: #65533; the contribution of comparative politics as a distinct field within political science to our understanding of democracy, democratic politics and democratic theory #65533; what we can learn from a comparative analysis of the role, functioning and behaviour of the principal actors (electorate, parties and institutions) across nations #65533; the relationship between politics and public policy formation and processes of democratic decision-making and corresponding policy-making capacity #65533; how we measure contemporary democracy or democratic performance in both a procedural and material sense. Comparative Democratic Politics will afford new and important insights to the contemporary study of representative democracy. It will be essential reading for all students and academics of political science and public policy seeking a deeper understanding of both the world's so called established and emerging democracies.

Comparative Democratic Politics: A Guide to Contemporary Theory and Research

by Dr Hans Keman

Democracy is the most widely used way of organizing politics in the contemporary world. Comparative Democratic Politics brings together a team of renowned international scholars to provide a comprehensive review of theory and research in this essential area of comparative study. A key aim to the book is to introduce and understand representative democracy as a political process and contemporary system of governance in need of constant attention and scrutiny. Four important themes include: · the contribution of comparative politics as a distinct field within political science to our understanding of democracy, democratic politics and democratic theory · what we can learn from a comparative analysis of the role, functioning and behaviour of the principal actors (electorate, parties and institutions) across nations · the relationship between politics and public policy formation and processes of democratic decision-making and corresponding policy-making capacity · how we measure contemporary democracy or democratic performance in both a procedural and material sense. Comparative Democratic Politics will afford new and important insights to the contemporary study of representative democracy. It will be essential reading for all students and academics of political science and public policy seeking a deeper understanding of both the world's so called established and emerging democracies.

A Comparative Political Economy of Industrial Capitalism

by R. Mascarenhas

This comparative study of industrial capitalism is an examination of state-economy relations in mixed economies ranging from the interventionist German and Japanese to the less interventionist Anglo-American. Following the postwar consensus that resulted in the 'golden age' (1950-1973) and ended with the energy crisis, the Anglo-American economies adopted neoliberalism while Germany and Japan remained interventionist. This resulted in the emergence of national types of capitalism. While analyzing the increased competition between them, R.C.Mascarenhas also notes the influence of globalization as well as 'alternative capitalism' with the survival and re-emergence of industrial districts.

Comparing Democracies 2: New Challenges in the Study of Elections and Voting

by Dr Pippa Norris Mr Lawrence Leduc Professor Richard G Niemi

The first edition of Comparing Democracies was a landmark text, providing students with a thematic introduction to the global study of elections and voting. In this major new edition the world's leading international scholars have again produced an indispensable guide and up-to-date review of the whole field. Each of the chapters (the majority of which are completely new) provide a broad theoretical and comparative understanding of all the key topics associated with the elections including electoral and party systems, voter choice and turnout, campaign communications, and the new politics of direct democracy. This Second Edition will remain essential reading for students and lecturers of elections and voting behaviour, comparative politics, parties, and democracy.

Completing Transition: The Main Challenges

by Peter Mooslechner

"Completing Transition: The Main Challenges" was the topic around which the Oesterreichische Nationalbank and the Joint Vienna Institute organized a high-level conference in 2000, in a continuation of long-standing efforts to promote the dialogue and understanding between various regions in Europe. Given the heterogeneity of the transition countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the heterogeneity of progress toward convergence, the outlook for finishing transition is divergent. However, what will generally be important is corporate governance and institutional reform to sufficiently underpin macroeconomic success, plus a definite commitment of the responsible institutions in the transition countries to follow the chosen policies consistently.

A Comprehensive Assessment of the Role of Risk in U.S. Agriculture (Natural Resource Management and Policy #23)

by Richard E. Just Rulon D. Pope

After all the research on agricultural risk to date, the treatment of risk in agricultural research is far from harmonious. Many competing risk models have been proposed. Some new methodologies are largely untested. Some of the leading empirical methodologies in agricultural economic research are poorly suited for problems with aggregate data where risk averse behavior is less likely to be important. This book is intended to (i) define the current state of the literature on agricultural risk research, (ii) provide a critical evaluation of economic risk research on agriculture to date and (iii) set a research agenda that will meet future needs and prospects. This type of research promises to become of increasing importance because agricultural policy in the United States and elsewhere has decidedly shifted from explicit income support objectives to risk-related motivations of helping farmers deal with risk. Beginning with the 1996 Farm Bill, the primary set of policy instruments from U.S. agriculture has shifted from target prices and set aside acreage to agricultural crop insurance. Because this book is intended to have specific implications for U.S. agricultural policy, it has a decidedly domestic scope, but clearly many of the issues have application abroad. For each of the papers and topics included in this volume, individuals have been selected to give the strongest and broadest possible treatment of each facet of the problem. The result is this comprehensive reference book on the economics of agricultural risk.

Concepts of Non-Provocative Defence: Ideas and Practices in International Security (St Antony's Series)

by G. Wiseman

This book examines the viability of non-provocative defence - the controversial idea that defensive military policies and practices reduce the risk of wars and provide a viable basis for defending a society should war break out. Drawing on case studies from Europe, the 1991 Persian Gulf War, and Asia-Pacific, the author concludes that non-provocative defence concepts remain relevant and that they can help in deterring, conducting, and settling wars.

Conceptualizing the West in International Relations Thought: From Spengler to Said

by J. O'Hagan

West is a concept widely used in international relations, but we rarely reflect on what we mean by the term. Conceptions of and what the West is vary widely. This book examines conceptions of the West drawn from writers from diverse historical and intellectual contexts, revealing both interesting parallels and points of divergence. It also reflects on implications of these different perceptions of how we understand the role of the West, and its interactions with other civilizational identities.

Concise Dictionary of Foreign Quotations

by Anthony Lejeune

Here is the answer for anyone who comes across a foreign-language quotation in a newspaper article or a book and isn't quite sure what it means. Here are famous sayings, in five European languages--Latin, French, German, Italian, and Spanish--accompanied by their translations into English and cross-indexed for easy reference. Just what did Mussolini say about making the trains run on time? Did Marie-Antoinette really tell the poor to eat cake? Concise Dictionary of Foreign Quotations includes more than 3,000 entries, chosen by five editors, each one widely read in the language concerned. The majority of entries were included because they are familiar, those an English reader would be most likely to encounter. Literary quotations, political quotations, poetic thoughts, pungent comments, polished epigrams, shrewd perceptions--by everyone from Cicero to Sartre, from Michelangelo to Picasso.

Concise Dictionary of Foreign Quotations: Latin, French, Spanish, German And Italian

by Anthony Lejeune

Here is the answer for anyone who comes across a foreign-language quotation in a newspaper article or a book and isn't quite sure what it means. Here are famous sayings, in five European languages--Latin, French, German, Italian, and Spanish--accompanied by their translations into English and cross-indexed for easy reference. Just what did Mussolini say about making the trains run on time? Did Marie-Antoinette really tell the poor to eat cake? Concise Dictionary of Foreign Quotations includes more than 3,000 entries, chosen by five editors, each one widely read in the language concerned. The majority of entries were included because they are familiar, those an English reader would be most likely to encounter. Literary quotations, political quotations, poetic thoughts, pungent comments, polished epigrams, shrewd perceptions--by everyone from Cicero to Sartre, from Michelangelo to Picasso.

A Concise History of the Modern World: 1500 to the Present: A Guide to World Affairs

by W. Woodruff

By investigating the major changes of world history during the past five hundred years, this book provides the necessary global perspective to understand the geopolitical and geoeconomic changes facing us today. We have reached a crucial transitional stage in world history in which the world will no longer be shaped by the single image of western modernism, but increasingly by the image of all cultures and civilizations. The need to take a world view - which this book provides - has become acute.

Conflict, Security, Foreign Policy, and International Political Economy: Past Paths and Future Directions in International Studies (Millennial reflections on international studies)

by Michael Brecher Frank P. Harvey

No study of international relations is complete without consideration of foreign policy processes and an understanding of state security, conflict in global politics, and the relationship between the world economy and international behavior. Conflict, Security, Foreign Policy, and International Political Economy: Past Paths and Future Directions in International Studies consists of twelve original essays that point out the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches in these research areas as well as suggest agendas for future research. See table of contents and excerpts. Frank P. Harvey is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Centre for Foreign Policy Studies at Dalhousie University. Michael Brecher is the R.B. Angus Professor of Political Science at McGill University and past president of the International Studies Association. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Millennial Reflections on International Studies This volume is part of the Millennial Reflections on International Studies project in which forty-five prominent scholars engage in self-critical, state-of-the-art reflection on international studies to stimulate debates about successes and failures and to address the larger questions of progress in the discipline. Other paperbacks from this project: Realism and Institutionalism in International Studies Evaluating Methodology Critical Perspectives in International Studies The full collection of essays is available in the handbook Millennial Reflections on International Studies.

Congress For Dummies

by David Silverberg

Congress For Dummies helps you sort out what Congress does on a daily basis and what it all means to you, the citizen. It shows you how to get organized, make your voice heard, and influence legislation that might affect you. Full of helpful resources such as contact information for House and Senate offices, and smart, straightforward explanations of the legislative process, this book is everything you need to understand Congress and get involved in your government. Whether you just want to know how government works, or you want to get involved to change your country, this simple guide covers all the ins and outs of Congress. It’s a nonpartisan look at Congress that includes forewords by Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert and Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle. Inside you’ll find easy explanations and helpful tips on how to: Get involved in the democratic process Influence legislation that’s important to you Understa nd Congress and the media Contact your senators and representatives Check out Congress in action, in person Deal with congressional staff Expert author David Silverberg — Managing Editor and a columnist at the Washington weekly The Hill — takes the mystery out of getting something done in Congress, introducing you to the players and explaining everything from legislation and lobbying to caucuses and coalitions. Written with the citizen advocate in mind, this helpful guide gives regular people the tools and knowledge they need to achieve their aims. Inside, you’ll discover: How the three branches of government work together How to register your opinion with your elected officials How the legislative process works — from idea to law How debates, conferences, and vetoes work How budgeting and appropriations work How to get the most effect from your political contributions How the lobbying process works How to advocate for legislation How to deal with congressional staffers How to make use of congressional services Getting something done in the messy confusion of democracy and bureaucracy is no easy task. Full of the kind of information and knowledge that Washington insiders take for granted, Congress For Dummies levels the playing field so that regular people — just like you — can make a difference, too.

Congressional Government: A Study in American Politics

by Woodrow Wilson

The government of the United States is a living system. As such, it is subject to subtle change and modification over time, but still maintains a constancy via its central nervous system-a congressional form of rule. Woodrow Wilson saw congressional government as ""Committee"" government. It is administered by semi-independent executive agents who obey the dictates of a legislature, though the agents themselves are not of ultimate authority or accountability. Written by Wilson when he was a twenty-eight-year-old graduate student, this is an astounding examination of the American legislative branches, especially in light of the fact that Wilson had not yet even visited Congress at the time of its composition.Wilson divides Congressional Government into six parts. In part one, his introductory statement, Wilson analyzes the need for a federal Constitution and asks whether or not it is still a document that should be unquestioningly venerated. In part two, Wilson describes the make-up and functions of the House of Representatives in painstaking detail. Part three is concerned with taxation and financial administration by the government and its resulting economic repercussions. Part four is an explanation of the Senate's role in the legislative process. The electoral system and responsibilities of the president are the central concerns of part five. And Wilson concludes, in part six, with a both philosophical and practical summarization of the congressional form of the United States government, in which he also compares it to European modes of state governance.In a new introduction specially prepared for this edition, William F. Connelly, Jr. compares Wilson, as a professional politician, to former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich. He notes that Wilson's ideas, which have had a lasting influence, helped form Gingrich's outlook on the role of the Constitution and the executive branch in the legislative process. He also investigates Wilson's criticism of Madison's separat

Congressional Government: A Study in American Politics

by Woodrow Wilson

The government of the United States is a living system. As such, it is subject to subtle change and modification over time, but still maintains a constancy via its central nervous system-a congressional form of rule. Woodrow Wilson saw congressional government as ""Committee"" government. It is administered by semi-independent executive agents who obey the dictates of a legislature, though the agents themselves are not of ultimate authority or accountability. Written by Wilson when he was a twenty-eight-year-old graduate student, this is an astounding examination of the American legislative branches, especially in light of the fact that Wilson had not yet even visited Congress at the time of its composition.Wilson divides Congressional Government into six parts. In part one, his introductory statement, Wilson analyzes the need for a federal Constitution and asks whether or not it is still a document that should be unquestioningly venerated. In part two, Wilson describes the make-up and functions of the House of Representatives in painstaking detail. Part three is concerned with taxation and financial administration by the government and its resulting economic repercussions. Part four is an explanation of the Senate's role in the legislative process. The electoral system and responsibilities of the president are the central concerns of part five. And Wilson concludes, in part six, with a both philosophical and practical summarization of the congressional form of the United States government, in which he also compares it to European modes of state governance.In a new introduction specially prepared for this edition, William F. Connelly, Jr. compares Wilson, as a professional politician, to former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich. He notes that Wilson's ideas, which have had a lasting influence, helped form Gingrich's outlook on the role of the Constitution and the executive branch in the legislative process. He also investigates Wilson's criticism of Madison's separat

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