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The Structure of CP and IP: The Cartography of Syntactic Structures, Volume 2 (Oxford Studies in Comparative Syntax)

by Luigi Rizzi

The study of syntactic complexity and the identification of the elementary structural units involved have always been a component of research in the field of theoretical syntax. Still, these topics have recently acquired a higher degree of prominence and autonomy, which has led to an expansion in the ways syntacticians conceptualize syntactic representations and their interactions with other research topics. The Structure of CP and IP is the second volume in the Cartography of Syntactic Structures, a subgroup within the Oxford Studies in Comparative Syntax series. Funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, this research endeavor gave rise to the publication of the first such volume, The Functional Structure of DP and IP, which focuses primarily on the structure of nominal expressions and on certain aspects of clausal expressions. This second edited volume examines the structure of the clauses, with special reference to the inflectional domain (IP) and the left peripheral field of the clause (CP). With contributions by a select group of syntacticians, The Structure of CP and IP will be useful to scholars with an interest in Italian, Romance, and comparative syntax, and of substantial value to all linguists interested in contemporary research in generative grammar.

The Structure of English Clauses (Routledge Library Editions: The English Language)

by David J. Young

First published in 1980, this book provides a clear and practical introduction to a wide variety of English structures. It concentrates on a large and crucial area of English grammar, which covers units of higher rank than words, and structures that have verbs rather than nouns as their nuclear elements. Throughout the book, David Young focuses on the English language as it is actually spoken. At every point his discussion of syntax is closely integrated with meaning, and he pays particular attention to the ways in which speakers of English signal their intensions. The author points out how verbal patterning is meaningful, and outlines the criteria used by grammarians to distinguish one structure from another. The result is an analytical framework that can be applied to any real-life text in order to understand its structure. This is a book that will encourage a realistic, exploratory and investigative attitude towards the English language.

The Structure of English Clauses (Routledge Library Editions: The English Language)

by David J. Young

First published in 1980, this book provides a clear and practical introduction to a wide variety of English structures. It concentrates on a large and crucial area of English grammar, which covers units of higher rank than words, and structures that have verbs rather than nouns as their nuclear elements. Throughout the book, David Young focuses on the English language as it is actually spoken. At every point his discussion of syntax is closely integrated with meaning, and he pays particular attention to the ways in which speakers of English signal their intensions. The author points out how verbal patterning is meaningful, and outlines the criteria used by grammarians to distinguish one structure from another. The result is an analytical framework that can be applied to any real-life text in order to understand its structure. This is a book that will encourage a realistic, exploratory and investigative attitude towards the English language.

The Structure of International Publishing in the 1990s

by Fred Kobrak

The past decade has brought dramatic changes to the publishing industry. Publishing companies merged with one another or were bought by larger companies or media conglomerates; mergers and acquisitions crossed national boundaries and language barriers; technological advances altered the publication process and made available new media and the re-examination of the established print media. This volume examines these changes and illuminates the various prospects for the future of publishing in the coming decade.

The Structure of International Publishing in the 1990s

by Fred Kobrak Beth Luey

The past decade has brought dramatic changes to the publishing industry. Publishing companies merged with one another or were bought by larger companies or media conglomerates; mergers and acquisitions crossed national boundaries and language barriers; technological advances altered the publication process and made available new media and the re-examination of the established print media. This volume examines these changes and illuminates the various prospects for the future of publishing in the coming decade.

The Structure of Modern Standard French: A Student Grammar

by Maj-Britt Mosegaard Hansen

This book is an advanced student's grammar of French that integrates traditional grammar with knowledge and insights from modern linguistics. Maj-Britt Mosegaard Hansen takes a structural approach to French grammar: she provides clear descriptions of grammatical rules based explicitly on syntactic structure, and places descriptive emphasis on instances where the grammatical structures of French differ from those used in corresponding contexts in English. The first part of the book provides an introduction to French sentence structure, before the following parts examine the grammar of verbs, nominals, particles, and clauses and sentences. The Structure of Modern Standard French will be a valuable resource for students of French at undergraduate level and beyond. It assumes some prior knowledge of French grammar but is designed to be accessible to those with no background in linguistics.

The Structure of Multimodal Documents: An Empirical Approach (Routledge Studies in Multimodality)

by Tuomo Hiippala

This book develops a new framework for describing the structure of multimodal documents: how language, image, layout and other modes of communication work together to convey meaning. Building on recent research in multimodal analysis, functional linguistics and information design, the book examines the textual, visual, and spatial aspects of page-based multimodal documents and employs an analytical model to describe and interpret their structure using the concepts of semiotic modes, medium and genre. To demonstrate and test this approach, the study performs a systematic, longitudinal analysis of a corpus of multimodal documents within a single genre: an extensively annotated corpus of tourist brochures produced between 1967-2008. The book provides multimodal discourse analysts with methodological tools to draw empirically-based conclusions about multimodal documents, and will be a valuable resource for researchers planning to develop and study multimodal corpora.

The Structure of Multimodal Documents: An Empirical Approach (Routledge Studies in Multimodality)

by Tuomo Hiippala

This book develops a new framework for describing the structure of multimodal documents: how language, image, layout and other modes of communication work together to convey meaning. Building on recent research in multimodal analysis, functional linguistics and information design, the book examines the textual, visual, and spatial aspects of page-based multimodal documents and employs an analytical model to describe and interpret their structure using the concepts of semiotic modes, medium and genre. To demonstrate and test this approach, the study performs a systematic, longitudinal analysis of a corpus of multimodal documents within a single genre: an extensively annotated corpus of tourist brochures produced between 1967-2008. The book provides multimodal discourse analysts with methodological tools to draw empirically-based conclusions about multimodal documents, and will be a valuable resource for researchers planning to develop and study multimodal corpora.

The Structure of Philosophical Discourse: A Genre and Move Analysis (Routledge Studies in Applied Linguistics)

by Kyle Lucas Sarah Lucas

This book builds on existing work in genre analysis and move analysis in English for Specific Purposes (ESP) and applies this new framework to academic philosophical discourse, offering new insights into how ESP traditions can elucidate shifts in language conventions across disciplinary contexts.The volume begins by surveying the state of the art in English for Specific Purposes and genre theory, as well as other genre theory paradigms before turning the focus on move analysis. Lucas and Lucas seek to maximize the potential of move analysis to precisely operationalize functional units of discourse by implementing a cognitive theory of genre grounded in frame semantics. Using the case of academic research articles in philosophy, the authors demonstrate how this framework can reveal distinctive dimensions unique to philosophical discourse and, in turn, how such an approach might be applied more broadly to examine nuances in language across disciplines and inform ESP research in the future.This book will appeal to students and researchers in English for Specific Purposes, discourse analysis, academic writing, applied linguistics, and rhetoric and composition.

The Structure of Philosophical Discourse: A Genre and Move Analysis (Routledge Studies in Applied Linguistics)

by Kyle Lucas Sarah Lucas

This book builds on existing work in genre analysis and move analysis in English for Specific Purposes (ESP) and applies this new framework to academic philosophical discourse, offering new insights into how ESP traditions can elucidate shifts in language conventions across disciplinary contexts.The volume begins by surveying the state of the art in English for Specific Purposes and genre theory, as well as other genre theory paradigms before turning the focus on move analysis. Lucas and Lucas seek to maximize the potential of move analysis to precisely operationalize functional units of discourse by implementing a cognitive theory of genre grounded in frame semantics. Using the case of academic research articles in philosophy, the authors demonstrate how this framework can reveal distinctive dimensions unique to philosophical discourse and, in turn, how such an approach might be applied more broadly to examine nuances in language across disciplines and inform ESP research in the future.This book will appeal to students and researchers in English for Specific Purposes, discourse analysis, academic writing, applied linguistics, and rhetoric and composition.

The Structure of Psychological Common Sense

by Jan Smedslund

Psychologic is a formal system and relationship within which psychological processes are defined. The language people ordinarily use to formulate, think, and talk about psychological phenomena is organized by Jan Smedslund into a set of propositions aimed at identifying the generalities which underlie human behavior. In this way, psychologic illuminates the conceptual system of psychology embedded in ordinary language. This book continues Professor Smedslund's search for stable theoretical structures to explain the meanings that are part of all psychological investigation.

The Structure of Psychological Common Sense

by Jan Smedslund

Psychologic is a formal system and relationship within which psychological processes are defined. The language people ordinarily use to formulate, think, and talk about psychological phenomena is organized by Jan Smedslund into a set of propositions aimed at identifying the generalities which underlie human behavior. In this way, psychologic illuminates the conceptual system of psychology embedded in ordinary language. This book continues Professor Smedslund's search for stable theoretical structures to explain the meanings that are part of all psychological investigation.

The Structure of Scientific Examination Questions (SpringerBriefs in Education)

by Adrian Day

This book shows how Systemic Functional Linguistics may be used to explore and explain the grammar of scientific examination questions. The author outlines the key elements of this theory and identifies problematical structures that affect the linguistic validity of such education assessment questions. This book also shows how examination questions may provide insight into the relationship between teaching and language in science.Do candidates give an incorrect answer because they do not understand the topic or because they do not understand the language by which the question is framed? This book shows how the analysis of scientific examination questions can answer this question.These chapters show how contemporary linguistics can inform the assessment of science and address topics including: the role of images, lexicography, the morphology of sentences, semantic discontinuity and the active reader.An example question is used throughout the text to illustrate the theories and each chapter has its own useful summary, making it a very readable work.

The Structure of Tone

by Zhiming Bao

This book argues a fresh theory about the structure of tone. Bao investigates a wide range of tone sandhi data from various Chinese dialects and other Asian tone languages, providing empirical support for his proposal that tone is a formal entity which consists of register and contour. Bao establishes a clear typological distinction between register tone languages and contour tone languages whose contour tones have a more complex structure.

The Structure of Truth

by Donald Davidson

Donald Davidson was one of the most famous and influential philosophers of the twentieth century. The Structure of Truth presents his 1970 Locke Lectures in print for the first time. They comprise an invaluable historical document which illuminates how Davidson was thinking about the theory of meaning, the role of a truth theory therein, the ontological commitments of a truth theory, the notion of logical form, and so on, at a pivotal moment in the development of his thought. Unlike Davidson's previously published work, the lectures are written so as to be presented to an audience as a fully organized and coherent exposition of his program in the philosophy of language. Had they been widely available in the years following 1970, the reception of Davidson's work might have been very different. Given the systematic nature of their presentation of Davidson's semantic program, these lectures will be of interest to anyone working in the philosophy of language.

The Structure of Truth

by Donald Davidson

Donald Davidson was one of the most famous and influential philosophers of the twentieth century. The Structure of Truth presents his 1970 Locke Lectures in print for the first time. They comprise an invaluable historical document which illuminates how Davidson was thinking about the theory of meaning, the role of a truth theory therein, the ontological commitments of a truth theory, the notion of logical form, and so on, at a pivotal moment in the development of his thought. Unlike Davidson's previously published work, the lectures are written so as to be presented to an audience as a fully organized and coherent exposition of his program in the philosophy of language. Had they been widely available in the years following 1970, the reception of Davidson's work might have been very different. Given the systematic nature of their presentation of Davidson's semantic program, these lectures will be of interest to anyone working in the philosophy of language.

The Structure of Words at the Interfaces (Oxford Studies in Theoretical Linguistics #68)


This volume takes a variety of approaches to the question 'what is a word?', with particular emphasis on where in the grammar wordhood is determined. Chapters in the book all start from the assumption that structures at, above, and below the 'word' are built in the same derivational system: there is no lexicalist grammatical subsystem dedicated to word-building. This type of framework foregrounds the difficulty in defining wordhood. Questions such as whether there are restrictions on the size of structures that distinguish words from phrases, or whether there are combinatory operations that are specific to one or the other, are central to the debate. In this respect, chapters in the volume do not all agree. Some propose wordhood to be limited to entities defined by syntactic heads, while others propose that phrasal structure can be found within words. Some propose that head-movement and adjunction (and Morphological Merger, as its mirror image) are the manner in which words are built, while others propose that phrasal movements are crucial to determining the order of morphemes word-internally. All chapters point to the conclusion that the phonological domains that we call words are read off of the morphosyntactic structure in particular ways. It is the study of this interface, between the syntactic and phonological modules of Universal Grammar, that underpins the discussion in this volume.

The Structure Underlying Measure Phrase Sentences (Foundations of Language Supplementary Series #17)

by W.G. Klooster

I should like to express my gratitude to my supervisor, Professor H. Schultink, whose criticisms and careful reading helped me to improve considerably upon the clarity of exposition while I wrote this study, and whose seemingly innocent requests to elaborate confronted me time and again with the need of revising or abandoning ideas I thought stood on firm ground. His support, and Dr. M. C. van den Toom's gratefully acknowl­ edged willingness to read and evaluate the manuscript enabled me to present this work as a thesis in the University of Utrecht. In more than one way, lowe a debt to Albert Kraak, Professor of Linguistics in the University of Nijmegen. His inspiring enthusiasm awakened my interest in linguistics when I was a student of his. He in­ troduced me to transformational grammar at a time when it seemed almost improper to talk about it, and the stimulating experience of writing a book on Dutch syntax together with him taught me invaluable lessons. I should also like to thank my friend and colleague Henk Verkuyl, to­ gether with whom I prepared an article on the subject of measuring duration in Dutch. Without our stimulating discussions on the subject, the fourth chapter of this study could never have been written in the present form. I am also indebted to him for criticisms and helpful suggestions. At an early stage I profited greatly from discussions with Pieter A. M.

Structures and Beyond: The Cartography of Syntactic Structures, Volume 3 (Oxford Studies in Comparative Syntax)

by Adriana Belletti

This is the third volume in the subset of volumes in the comparative syntax series devoted to the cartography of syntactic structures. Adriana Belletti has collected articles by top linguists that were originally presented at a workshop at the University of Siena in conjunction with a visit by Noam Chomsky. The articles go beyond mapping syntactic and semantic/pragmatic properties, also touching on broader questions, particularly related to the Minimalist Program and other recent theoretical developments. Contributors include Adriana Belletti, Alfonso Caramazza, Gennaro Chierchia, Guglielmo Cinque, Noam Chomsky, Richard Kayne, Jacques Mehler, Marina Nespor, Luigi Rizzi, Kevin Shapiro, and Michael Starke.

Structures for Semantics (Studies in Linguistics and Philosophy #45)

by Fred Landman

Formalization plays an important role in semantics. Doing semantics and following the literature requires considerable technical sophistica­ tion and acquaintance with quite advanced mathematical techniques and structures. But semantics isn't mathematics. These techniques and structures are tools that help us build semantic theories. Our real aim is to understand semantic phenomena and we need the technique to make our understanding of these phenomena precise. The problems in semantics are most often too hard and slippery, to completely trust our informal understanding of them. This should not be taken as an attack on informal reasoning in semantics. On the contrary, in my view, very often the essential insight in a diagnosis of what is going on in a certain semantic phenomenon takes place at the informal level. It is very easy, however, to be misled into thinking that a certain informal insight provides a satisfying analysis of a certain problem; it will often turn out that there is a fundamental unclarity about what the informal insight actually is. Formalization helps to sharpen those insights and put them to the test.

Structures Mères: Semantics, Mathematics, and Cognitive Science (Studies in Applied Philosophy, Epistemology and Rational Ethics #57)

by Alberto Peruzzi Silvano Zipoli Caiani

This book reports on cutting-edge concepts related to Bourbaki’s notion of structures mères. It merges perspectives from logic, philosophy, linguistics and cognitive science, suggesting how they can be combined with Bourbaki’s mathematical structuralism in order to solve foundational, ontological and epistemological problems using a novel category-theoretic approach. By offering a comprehensive account of Bourbaki’s structuralism and answers to several important questions that have arisen in connection with it, the book provides readers with a unique source of information and inspiration for future research on this topic.

Structures, Syntactic Computations and Acquisition (Routledge Leading Linguists)

by Adriana Belletti

This book collects some of the most significant articles by Adriana Belletti published over the last ten years or so, offering readers a useful tool to see the mutual enrichment between linguistic theory and experimental studies on (modes of) language acquisition through her work. The volume explores domains of theoretical morphosyntax in the generative tradition and theoretically guided studies on language acquisition. An introduction specific to this volume contextualizes these contributions within ongoing developments in the field. Part I presents studies inspired by the illuminating interchange between linguistic theory and experimentation in the domain of language acquisition, leading to the formulation of explicit research questions tested experimentally and guiding in the proper interpretation of the results. Part II offers refined, detailed theoretical analyses of domains in which peripheral positions in the clause structures are crucially involved to express discourse contents, in sometimes not standard ways during development. Demonstrating how refined linguistic analyses play a crucial role in interpretating the peculiar shape of developmental data, this book will be of interest to scholars in syntax, language acquisition, and theoretical linguistics.

Structures, Syntactic Computations and Acquisition (Routledge Leading Linguists)

by Adriana Belletti

This book collects some of the most significant articles by Adriana Belletti published over the last ten years or so, offering readers a useful tool to see the mutual enrichment between linguistic theory and experimental studies on (modes of) language acquisition through her work. The volume explores domains of theoretical morphosyntax in the generative tradition and theoretically guided studies on language acquisition. An introduction specific to this volume contextualizes these contributions within ongoing developments in the field. Part I presents studies inspired by the illuminating interchange between linguistic theory and experimentation in the domain of language acquisition, leading to the formulation of explicit research questions tested experimentally and guiding in the proper interpretation of the results. Part II offers refined, detailed theoretical analyses of domains in which peripheral positions in the clause structures are crucially involved to express discourse contents, in sometimes not standard ways during development. Demonstrating how refined linguistic analyses play a crucial role in interpretating the peculiar shape of developmental data, this book will be of interest to scholars in syntax, language acquisition, and theoretical linguistics.

Structuring Events: A Study in the Semantics of Lexical Aspect (Explorations in Semantics #5)

by Susan Rothstein

Structuring Events presents a novel semantic theory of lexical aspect for anyone interested in the study of verb meanings. Provides an introduction to aspectual classes and aspectual distinctions. Utilizes case studies to present a novel semantic theory of lexical aspect and compare it with alternative theories. Useful for students and scholars in semantics and syntax as well as the neighboring fields of pragmatics and philosophy of language.

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Showing 65,326 through 65,350 of 76,538 results