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A Shorter Life

by Alan Jenkins

In his most eloquent and formally satisfying collection to date, Alan Jenkins plays a series of powerful and haunting variations on love and loss. The themes that run through our lives are relatively few, for all that they sound subtly different to each of us, with their own rich freight of places and faces. In poems that pay homage to what is unique to his own past experience - a suburban fifties upbringing, a heady youth of rebellion and exploration - Jenkins reminds us vividly of what is experienced by us all. The search for love (or failing that, sex), the passing of time and the inevitability of pain and grief, the struggle for transcendence against our awareness of limitation: these are the things that can suddenly seem to compose a life - a life not so much reduced to essentials as seen in its passionate essence, a 'shorter' life. Though not in any formal sense a sequel, this poignant book recapitulates some of the motifs of The Drift (2000) and earlier volumes, to offer an extended meditation on memory and recurrence, and a statement - compelling, candid, sorrowful and subtle - of life's beauty and brevity.

The Shorter Writings (Agora Editions)

by Xenophon

This book contains new, annotated, and literal yet accessible translations of Xenophon’s eight shorter writings, accompanied by interpretive essays that reveal these works to be masterful achievements by a serious thinker of the first rank who raises important moral, political, and philosophical questions. Five of these shorter writings are unmistakably devoted to political matters. The Agesilaos is a eulogy of a Spartan king, and the Hiero, or the Skilled Tyrant recounts a searching dialogue between a poet and a tyrant. The Regime of the Lacedaemonians presents itself as a laudatory examination of what turns out to be an oligarchic regime of a certain type, while The Regime of the Athenians offers an unflattering picture of a democratic regime. Ways and Means, or On Revenues offers suggestions on how to improve the political economy of Athens’ troubled democracy.The other three works included here—The Skilled Cavalry Commander, On Horsemanship, and The One Skilled at Hunting with Dogs—treat skills deemed appropriate for soldiers and leaders, touching on matters of political importance, especially in regard to war. By bringing together Xenophon’s shorter writings, this volume aims to help those interested in Xenophon to better understand the core of his thought, political as well as philosophical.Interpretive essays by: Wayne Ambler, Robert C. Bartlett, Amy L. Bonnette, Susan D. Collins, Michael Ehrmantraut, David Levy, Gregory A. McBrayer, Abram N. Shulsky.

Shouting From The Summits

by Kala Ramachandran

Living proof that a stammer need not hold you back'. Lets Geddes. Kala Ramachandran struggled with a stammer and it became so debilitating she thought it would be with her her whole life. But then she embraced mountaineering. And finally found her voice. This is her story. 'It is a given we will have obstacles in life, some of us from the very beginning. Kala's story is one of perseverance; of overcoming; of hope. The world she grew up in didn't include Asian women who climbed mountains. Now it does thanks to Kala never letting go of her dream.' Warren Macdonald

Show Me The Place: Essays

by Hedley Twidle

Apocalyptic futures surround us. In films, books and in news feeds, we are subjected to a barrage of end-time possibilities. Award-winning writer Hedley Twidle, in quixotic mood, sets out to snatch utopia from the jaws of dystopia. Whether embarking on a bizarre quest to find Cecil Rhodes's missing nose (sliced off the bust of the Rhodes Memorial) or cycling the Scottish islands with a couple of squabbling anarchists; whether learning to surf (much too late) in the wild, freezing waters off the Cape Peninsula or navigating the fraught polities of a Buddhist retreat centre, the author explores forgotten utopias, intentional communities and islands of imagination with curiosity, hope and humour. Ranging from the science fiction of Ursula Le Guin to the 'living laboratory' of Auroville in south India, Show Me the Place investigates the deep human desire to imagine alternatives to what we take as normal or inevitable.

Show Me the Money: Writing Business and Economics Stories for Mass Communication

by Chris Roush

Show Me the Money is the definitive business journalism textbook that offers hands-on advice and examples on doing the job of a business journalist. Author Chris Roush draws on his experience as a business journalist and educator to explain how to cover businesses, industries and the economy, as well as where to find sources of information for stories. He demonstrates clearly how reporters take financial information and turn it into relevant facts that explain a topic to readers. This definitive business journalism text: provides real-world examples of business articles presents complex topics in a form easy to read and understand offers examples of where to find news stories in SEC filings gives comprehensive explanations and reviews of corporate financial, balance sheet, and cash flow statements provides tips on finding sources, such as corporate investors and hard-to-find corporate documents gives a comprehensive listing of websites for business journalists to use. Key updates for the second edition include: tips from professional business journalists provided throughout the text new chapters on personal finance reporting and covering specific business beats expanded coverage of real estate reporting updates throughout to reflect significant changes in SEC, finance, and economics industries. With numerous examples of documents and stories in the text, Show Me the Money is an essential guide for students and practitioners doing business journalism.

Show Me the Money: Writing Business and Economics Stories for Mass Communication

by Chris Roush

Show Me the Money is the definitive business journalism textbook that offers hands-on advice and examples on doing the job of a business journalist. Author Chris Roush draws on his experience as a business journalist and educator to explain how to cover businesses, industries and the economy, as well as where to find sources of information for stories. He demonstrates clearly how reporters take financial information and turn it into relevant facts that explain a topic to readers. This definitive business journalism text: provides real-world examples of business articles presents complex topics in a form easy to read and understand offers examples of where to find news stories in SEC filings gives comprehensive explanations and reviews of corporate financial, balance sheet, and cash flow statements provides tips on finding sources, such as corporate investors and hard-to-find corporate documents gives a comprehensive listing of websites for business journalists to use. Key updates for the second edition include: tips from professional business journalists provided throughout the text new chapters on personal finance reporting and covering specific business beats expanded coverage of real estate reporting updates throughout to reflect significant changes in SEC, finance, and economics industries. With numerous examples of documents and stories in the text, Show Me the Money is an essential guide for students and practitioners doing business journalism.

Show Me the Money: Writing Business and Economics Stories for Mass Communication (Routledge Communication Series)

by Chris Roush

Show Me the Money is the definitive business journalism textbook that offers hands-on advice and insights into the job of a business journalist. Chris Roush draws on his experience as both a business journalist and educator to explain how to cover businesses, industry and the economy, as well as where to find sources of information for stories and how to take financial information and make it work for a story. Updates to the third edition include: Inclusion of timely issues related to real estate; Additional examples from websites and other nontraditional business media such as BuzzFeed and Quartz; Tips from professional business journalists including Andrew Ross Sorkin of The New York Times and Jennifer Forsyth of The Wall Street Journal. Essential for both undergraduate and graduate courses in business journalism and professional business journalism newsrooms, Show Me the Money is a must-read for reporters, editors and students who want to learn the ins and outs of how to cover public and private companies. Additional materieals, including a sample syllabus and additional links and tips for students can be found at https://www.routledge.com/products/9781138188389

Show Me the Money: Writing Business and Economics Stories for Mass Communication (Routledge Communication Series)

by Chris Roush

Show Me the Money is the definitive business journalism textbook that offers hands-on advice and insights into the job of a business journalist. Chris Roush draws on his experience as both a business journalist and educator to explain how to cover businesses, industry and the economy, as well as where to find sources of information for stories and how to take financial information and make it work for a story. Updates to the third edition include: Inclusion of timely issues related to real estate; Additional examples from websites and other nontraditional business media such as BuzzFeed and Quartz; Tips from professional business journalists including Andrew Ross Sorkin of The New York Times and Jennifer Forsyth of The Wall Street Journal. Essential for both undergraduate and graduate courses in business journalism and professional business journalism newsrooms, Show Me the Money is a must-read for reporters, editors and students who want to learn the ins and outs of how to cover public and private companies. Additional materieals, including a sample syllabus and additional links and tips for students can be found at https://www.routledge.com/products/9781138188389

Show Me Your Environment: Essays on Poetry, Poets, and Poems (Poets On Poetry)

by David Baker

Show Me Your Environment, a penetrating yet personable collection of critical essays, David Baker explores how a poem works, how a poet thinks, and how the art of poetry has evolved—and is still evolving as a highly diverse, spacious, and inclusive art form. The opening essays offer contemplations on the “environment of poetry from thoughts on physical places and regions as well as the inner aesthetic environment. Next, he looks at the highly distinctive achievements and styles of poets ranging from George Herbert and Emily Dickinson through poets writing today. Finally, Baker takes joy in reading individual poems—from the canonical to the contemporary; simply and closely.

Showing Off, Showing Up: Studies of Hype, Heightened Performance, and Cultural Power

by Laurie Frederik Kimberley Bell Marra Catherine A Schuler

The interdisciplinary essays in Showing Off, Showing Up examine acts of showing, a particular species of performance that relies on competition and judgment, active spectatorship, embodied excess, and exposure of core values and hidden truths. Acts of showing highlight those dimensions of performance that can most manipulate spectators and consumers, often through over-the-top heightening and skewing of presentation. Many forms of showing and of heightened performance, however, operate more enigmatically and covertly while still profoundly affecting the social world, even if our reactions to them are initially flippant or unconcerned because “it’s just a show.” Examining a wide range of examples—from dog shows to competitive dancing to carnivals to striptease, the essays illuminate how such events variously foster competition, exaggerate a characteristic, and reveal hidden truths. There is as much to be learned about the power of showing through subtlety and underlying intentionality as through overt display. The book’s theoretical introduction and 12 essays by leading scholars reveal how diverse, particularly efficacious genres of showing are theoretically connected and why they merit more concerted attention, especially in the 21st century.

Shrek the Third Friends and Foes (I Can Read! #Level 2)

by Cathy Hapka

Shrek, Donkey, Princess Fiona and friends guide your child in their first steps to reading.

A Shrinking Island: Modernism and National Culture in England

by Jed Esty

This book describes a major literary culture caught in the act of becoming minor. In 1939, Virginia Woolf wrote in her diary, "Civilisation has shrunk." Her words captured not only the onset of World War II, but also a longer-term reversal of national fortune. The first comprehensive account of modernism and imperialism in England, A Shrinking Island tracks the joint eclipse of modernist aesthetics and British power from the literary experiments of the 1930s through the rise of cultural studies in the 1950s. Jed Esty explores the effects of declining empire on modernist form--and on the very meaning of Englishness. He ranges from canonical figures (T. S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf) to influential midcentury intellectuals (J. M. Keynes and J.R.R. Tolkien), from cultural studies pioneers (Raymond Williams and E. P. Thompson) to postwar migrant writers (George Lamming and Doris Lessing). Focusing on writing that converts the potential energy of the contracting British state into the language of insular integrity, he argues that an anthropological ethos of cultural holism came home to roost in late-imperial England. Esty's interpretation challenges popular myths about the death of English literature. It portrays the survivors of the modernist generation not as aesthetic dinosaurs, but as participants in the transition from empire to welfare state, from metropolitan art to national culture. Mixing literary criticism with postcolonial theory, his account of London modernism's end-stages and after-lives provides a fresh take on major works while redrawing the lines between modernism and postmodernism.

A Shrinking Island: Modernism and National Culture in England (PDF)

by Jed Esty

This book describes a major literary culture caught in the act of becoming minor. In 1939, Virginia Woolf wrote in her diary, "Civilisation has shrunk." Her words captured not only the onset of World War II, but also a longer-term reversal of national fortune. The first comprehensive account of modernism and imperialism in England, A Shrinking Island tracks the joint eclipse of modernist aesthetics and British power from the literary experiments of the 1930s through the rise of cultural studies in the 1950s. Jed Esty explores the effects of declining empire on modernist form--and on the very meaning of Englishness. He ranges from canonical figures (T. S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf) to influential midcentury intellectuals (J. M. Keynes and J.R.R. Tolkien), from cultural studies pioneers (Raymond Williams and E. P. Thompson) to postwar migrant writers (George Lamming and Doris Lessing). Focusing on writing that converts the potential energy of the contracting British state into the language of insular integrity, he argues that an anthropological ethos of cultural holism came home to roost in late-imperial England. Esty's interpretation challenges popular myths about the death of English literature. It portrays the survivors of the modernist generation not as aesthetic dinosaurs, but as participants in the transition from empire to welfare state, from metropolitan art to national culture. Mixing literary criticism with postcolonial theory, his account of London modernism's end-stages and after-lives provides a fresh take on major works while redrawing the lines between modernism and postmodernism.

A Shropshire Lad and Other Poems: The Collected Poems of A.E. Housman

by Nick Laird A. E. Housman

A. E. Housman was one of the best-loved poets of his day, whose poems conjure up a potent and idyllic rural world imbued with a poignant sense of loss. They are expressed in simple rhythms, yet show a fine ear for the subtleties of metre and alliteration. His scope is wide - ranging from religious doubt to intense nostalgia for the countryside. This volume brings together 'A Shropshire Lad' (1896) and 'Last Poems' (1922), along with the posthumous selections 'More Poems' and 'Additional Poems', and three translations of extracts from Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides that display his mastery of Classical literature.

Shut Up and Say Something: Business Communication Strategies to Overcome Challenges and Influence Listeners

by Karen Friedman

For business people looking to get results and up their income, this book divulges no-nonsense strategies that can turn anyone into a powerful speaker who can overcome challenges and influence the right listeners.In today's high-tech world, there are more ways than ever before to communicate: email, text messaging, voicemails, blogs, tweets, video conference calls, and remote meetings. But one thing is still exactly the same as in the old days: there are effective and ineffective ways to express yourself. All business professionals need to know how to communicate clearly, concisely, and passionately if they want their intended message to impact others.Shut Up and Say Something shows readers how to convincingly communicate their expertise in any business situation. This book demonstrates how to condense complicated concepts, minimize communication mistakes, avoid misinterpretation, convey vision, and quickly influence decision makers. Strategies for expressing yourself succinctly and clearly, dodging "loaded" questions, thinking fast on your feet, humanizing inscrutable information, and using humor to engage an audience are examples of the topics covered. The importance of prioritizing outcomes is emphasized throughout the book.

The Shy Manifesto (Modern Plays)

by Michael Ross

Last night I tried not to be shy, just as an experiment for one night - and with catastrophic results.17 year old Callum is proud to be shy and he thinks you should be too, because what this noisy, crazy world needs right now is a bit more self-restraint. The Shy Manifesto is a bittersweet coming-of-age comedy drama about a shy boy who is fed up of constantly being told to come out of his shell. Tonight he is to address an audience of radical shy comrades and incite the meek to finally rise up and inherit the earth. But memories of the previous night's drunken escapades at a classmate's end-of-term party keep intruding, and threaten to upend the fragile identity he has created for himself.Callum delivers his manifesto, exploring adolescence, isolation, self-loathing and sexuality. His irreverent lightness of touch, and multi- rolling as the other characters in his story endear him to the audience, encouraging us that we, too, can be proud to be shy.The Shy Manifesto is a solo piece that takes the experience of being shy as its central subject- something which has rarely been explored in drama, and yet which touches on many audience members lives.

The Shy Manifesto (Modern Plays)

by Michael Ross

Last night I tried not to be shy, just as an experiment for one night - and with catastrophic results.17 year old Callum is proud to be shy and he thinks you should be too, because what this noisy, crazy world needs right now is a bit more self-restraint. The Shy Manifesto is a bittersweet coming-of-age comedy drama about a shy boy who is fed up of constantly being told to come out of his shell. Tonight he is to address an audience of radical shy comrades and incite the meek to finally rise up and inherit the earth. But memories of the previous night's drunken escapades at a classmate's end-of-term party keep intruding, and threaten to upend the fragile identity he has created for himself.Callum delivers his manifesto, exploring adolescence, isolation, self-loathing and sexuality. His irreverent lightness of touch, and multi- rolling as the other characters in his story endear him to the audience, encouraging us that we, too, can be proud to be shy.The Shy Manifesto is a solo piece that takes the experience of being shy as its central subject- something which has rarely been explored in drama, and yet which touches on many audience members lives.

Shylock Is Shakespeare

by Kenneth Gross

Shylock, the Jewish moneylender in The Merchant of Venice who famously demands a pound of flesh as security for a loan to his antisemitic tormentors, is one of Shakespeare’s most complex and idiosyncratic characters. With his unsettling eloquence and his varying voices of protest, play, rage, and refusal, Shylock remains a source of perennial fascination. What explains the strange and enduring force of this character, so unlike that of any other in Shakespeare’s plays? Kenneth Gross posits that the figure of Shylock is so powerful because he is the voice of Shakespeare himself. Marvelously speculative and articulate, Gross’s book argues that Shylock is a breakthrough for Shakespeare the playwright, an early realization of the Bard’s power to create dramatic voices that speak for hidden, unconscious, even inhuman impulses—characters larger than the plays that contain them and ready to escape the author’s control. Shylock is also a mask for Shakespeare’s own need, rage, vulnerability, and generosity, giving form to Shakespeare’s ambition as an author and his uncertain bond with the audience. Gross’s vision of Shylock as Shakespeare’s covert double leads to a probing analysis of the character’s peculiar isolation, ambivalence, opacity, and dark humor. Addressing the broader resonance of Shylock, both historical and artistic, Gross examines the character’s hold on later readers and writers, including Heinrich Heine and Philip Roth, suggesting that Shylock mirrors the ambiguous states of Jewishness in modernity. A bravura critical performance, Shylock Is Shakespeare will fascinate readers with its range of reference, its union of rigor and play, and its conjectural—even fictive—means of coming to terms with the question of Shylock, ultimately taking readers to the very heart of Shakespeare’s humanizing genius.

Shylock Is Shakespeare

by Kenneth Gross

Shylock, the Jewish moneylender in The Merchant of Venice who famously demands a pound of flesh as security for a loan to his antisemitic tormentors, is one of Shakespeare’s most complex and idiosyncratic characters. With his unsettling eloquence and his varying voices of protest, play, rage, and refusal, Shylock remains a source of perennial fascination. What explains the strange and enduring force of this character, so unlike that of any other in Shakespeare’s plays? Kenneth Gross posits that the figure of Shylock is so powerful because he is the voice of Shakespeare himself. Marvelously speculative and articulate, Gross’s book argues that Shylock is a breakthrough for Shakespeare the playwright, an early realization of the Bard’s power to create dramatic voices that speak for hidden, unconscious, even inhuman impulses—characters larger than the plays that contain them and ready to escape the author’s control. Shylock is also a mask for Shakespeare’s own need, rage, vulnerability, and generosity, giving form to Shakespeare’s ambition as an author and his uncertain bond with the audience. Gross’s vision of Shylock as Shakespeare’s covert double leads to a probing analysis of the character’s peculiar isolation, ambivalence, opacity, and dark humor. Addressing the broader resonance of Shylock, both historical and artistic, Gross examines the character’s hold on later readers and writers, including Heinrich Heine and Philip Roth, suggesting that Shylock mirrors the ambiguous states of Jewishness in modernity. A bravura critical performance, Shylock Is Shakespeare will fascinate readers with its range of reference, its union of rigor and play, and its conjectural—even fictive—means of coming to terms with the question of Shylock, ultimately taking readers to the very heart of Shakespeare’s humanizing genius.

Shylock on the Stage (Routledge Library Editions: Shakespeare in Performance)

by Toby Lelyveld

Originally published in 1961, this book is a study of the ways actors since the time of Shakespeare have portrayed the character of Shylock. A pioneering work in the study of performance history as well as in the portrayal of Jews in English literature. Specifically it studies Charles Macklin, Edmund Kean, Edwin Booth, Henry Irving and more recent performers.

Shylock on the Stage (Routledge Library Editions: Shakespeare in Performance)

by Toby Lelyveld

Originally published in 1961, this book is a study of the ways actors since the time of Shakespeare have portrayed the character of Shylock. A pioneering work in the study of performance history as well as in the portrayal of Jews in English literature. Specifically it studies Charles Macklin, Edmund Kean, Edwin Booth, Henry Irving and more recent performers.

Shylock on Trial: The Appellate Briefs (Chicago Shorts)

by Richard A. Posner Charles Fried

William Shakespeare is inextricably linked with the law, his plays rich in its terms, settings, and thought processes. In Shylock on Trial: The Appellate Briefs, the Hon. Richard A. Posner and Charles Fried rule on Shakespeare’s classic drama The Merchant of Venice. Framed as a decision argued by two appellate judges of the period in a trial following Shylock’s sentencing by the Duke of Venice, these essays playfully walk the line between law and culture, dissecting the alleged legal inconsistencies of Shylock’s trial while engaging in an artful reading of the play itself. The resultant opinions shed fresh light on the relationship between literary and legal scholarship, demonstrating how Shakespeare’s thinking about legal concepts and legal practice points to a deep and sometimes vexed engagement with the law’s technical workings, its underlying premises, and its social effects.

A Siberian Journey: The Journal of Hans Jakob Fries, 1774 -1776 (Routledge Revivals)

by Hans J. Fries

First published in 1955 in German, this journal, published here in English for the first time, describes the adventures of a young Swiss surgeon who sought his fortune in eighteenth-century Russia, where he eventually made his mark and rose to a high position. The journal covers his journey to Southern Russia and his service there during the campaigns of 1770-74, and gives a day-by-day account of his trip through Siberia to the Chinese borders as a surgeon assisting a recruiting officer. Fries’ simple, straightforward and fresh narrative provides a vivid, human introduction to the little-known land and people of Siberia. In contrast to the more scientific specialist works of other eighteenth-century discoverers in Siberia, Fries’ account conveys the special lure of the country, with lively descriptions of the ordinary life of its inhabitants, of the town and countryside, of nature, people, customs and impressions. Their travels took the two companions through all of Siberia to the very borders of China, and we gain a valuable glimpse of the relations between Russians and Chinese at the time. Along the way we also meet numerous westerners whom a strange fate had brought to this isolated, enigmatic land. To Fries’ text is added a wide-ranging introduction by Professor Kirchner, which gives an account of the pioneering foreign scientists and tourists who travelled in Siberia during the century following the death of Peter the Great in 1725. Professor Kirchner traces the routes of their journeys, and describes the written works, some of them now classics, which ensued. The introduction thus provides an up-to-date bibliographical guide to the more elaborate and scholarly works which are supplemented by the new perspective on political and daily life in Siberia provided by the journal of Hans Jakob Fries.

A Siberian Journey: The Journal of Hans Jakob Fries, 1774 -1776 (Routledge Revivals)

by Hans J. Fries

First published in 1955 in German, this journal, published here in English for the first time, describes the adventures of a young Swiss surgeon who sought his fortune in eighteenth-century Russia, where he eventually made his mark and rose to a high position. The journal covers his journey to Southern Russia and his service there during the campaigns of 1770-74, and gives a day-by-day account of his trip through Siberia to the Chinese borders as a surgeon assisting a recruiting officer. Fries’ simple, straightforward and fresh narrative provides a vivid, human introduction to the little-known land and people of Siberia. In contrast to the more scientific specialist works of other eighteenth-century discoverers in Siberia, Fries’ account conveys the special lure of the country, with lively descriptions of the ordinary life of its inhabitants, of the town and countryside, of nature, people, customs and impressions. Their travels took the two companions through all of Siberia to the very borders of China, and we gain a valuable glimpse of the relations between Russians and Chinese at the time. Along the way we also meet numerous westerners whom a strange fate had brought to this isolated, enigmatic land. To Fries’ text is added a wide-ranging introduction by Professor Kirchner, which gives an account of the pioneering foreign scientists and tourists who travelled in Siberia during the century following the death of Peter the Great in 1725. Professor Kirchner traces the routes of their journeys, and describes the written works, some of them now classics, which ensued. The introduction thus provides an up-to-date bibliographical guide to the more elaborate and scholarly works which are supplemented by the new perspective on political and daily life in Siberia provided by the journal of Hans Jakob Fries.

Sibling Love and Incest in Jane Austen’s Fiction

by Glenda A Hudson

English lit scholar Glenda Hudson examines Jane Austen's presentation of sibling love and rivalry in the context of the dramatic social and historical changes in the late 18th century--and also analyzes the incest motif in numerous works of the period.

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