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The Accidental Time Machine (Gateway Essentials)

by Joe Haldeman

Grad-school dropout Matt Fuller is toiling as a lowly research assistant at MIT when, while measuring quantum relationships between gravity and light, his calibrator disappears - and reappears, one second later. In fact, every time Matt hits the reset button, the machine goes missing twelve times longer.After tinkering with the calibrator, Matt is convinced that what he has in his possession is a time machine. And by simply attaching a metal box to it, he learns to send things through time - including a pet-store turtle, which comes back no worse for wear.With a dead-end job and a girlfriend who left him for another man, Matt has nothing to lose by taking a time machine trip for himself. So he borrows an old car, stocks it with food and water, and ends up in the near future - under arrest for the murder of the car's original owner, who dropped dead after seeing Matt disappear before his eyes. The only way to beat the rap is to continue time travelling until he finds a place in time safe enough to stop for good. But such a place may not exist...

The Accommodated Animal: Cosmopolity in Shakespearean Locales

by Laurie Shannon

Shakespeare wrote of lions, shrews, horned toads, curs, mastiffs, and hellhounds. But the word “animal” itself only appears very rarely in his work, which was in keeping with sixteenth-century usage. As Laurie Shannon reveals in The Accommodated Animal, the modern human / animal divide first came strongly into play in the seventeenth century, with Descartes’s famous formulation that reason sets humans above other species: “I think, therefore I am.” Before that moment, animals could claim a firmer place alongside humans in a larger vision of belonging, or what she terms cosmopolity. With Shakespeare as her touchstone, Shannon explores the creaturely dispensation that existed until Descartes. She finds that early modern writers used classical natural history and readings of Genesis to credit animals with various kinds of stakeholdership, prerogative, and entitlement, employing the language of politics in a constitutional vision of cosmic membership. Using this political idiom to frame cross-species relations, Shannon argues, carried with it the notion that animals possess their own investments in the world, a point distinct from the question of whether animals have reason. It also enabled a sharp critique of the tyranny of humankind. By answering “the question of the animal” historically, The Accommodated Animal makes a brilliant contribution to cross-disciplinary debates engaging animal studies, political theory, intellectual history, and literary studies.

The Accommodated Animal: Cosmopolity in Shakespearean Locales

by Laurie Shannon

Shakespeare wrote of lions, shrews, horned toads, curs, mastiffs, and hellhounds. But the word “animal” itself only appears very rarely in his work, which was in keeping with sixteenth-century usage. As Laurie Shannon reveals in The Accommodated Animal, the modern human / animal divide first came strongly into play in the seventeenth century, with Descartes’s famous formulation that reason sets humans above other species: “I think, therefore I am.” Before that moment, animals could claim a firmer place alongside humans in a larger vision of belonging, or what she terms cosmopolity. With Shakespeare as her touchstone, Shannon explores the creaturely dispensation that existed until Descartes. She finds that early modern writers used classical natural history and readings of Genesis to credit animals with various kinds of stakeholdership, prerogative, and entitlement, employing the language of politics in a constitutional vision of cosmic membership. Using this political idiom to frame cross-species relations, Shannon argues, carried with it the notion that animals possess their own investments in the world, a point distinct from the question of whether animals have reason. It also enabled a sharp critique of the tyranny of humankind. By answering “the question of the animal” historically, The Accommodated Animal makes a brilliant contribution to cross-disciplinary debates engaging animal studies, political theory, intellectual history, and literary studies.

The Accommodation of Cultural Diversity: Case-Studies

by Crawford Young

The management of cultural diversity is a major challenge in many states. This book follows up the theoretical analysis of Ethnic Diversity and Public Policy with detailed case studies from leading international experts on Malaysia, Tanzania, Mauritius, Trinidad and Tobago, Northern Ireland, Spain and the United States of America to discover what lessons can be learnt for policy-makers in other divided societies.

The Accompaniment: Assembling the Contemporary

by Paul Rabinow

In this culmination of his search for anthropological concepts and practices appropriate to the twenty-first century, Paul Rabinow contends that to make sense of the contemporary anthropologists must invent new forms of inquiry. He begins with an extended rumination on what he gained from two of his formative mentors: Michel Foucault and Clifford Geertz. Reflecting on their lives as teachers and thinkers, as well as human beings, he poses questions about their critical limitations, unfulfilled hopes, and the lessons he learned from and with them. This spirit of collaboration animates The Accompaniment, as Rabinow assesses the last ten years of his career, largely spent engaging in a series of intensive experiments in collaborative research and often focused on cutting-edge work in synthetic biology. He candidly details the successes and failures of shifting his teaching practice away from individual projects, placing greater emphasis on participation over observation in research, and designing and using websites as a venue for collaboration. Analyzing these endeavors alongside his efforts to apply an anthropological lens to the natural sciences, Rabinow lays the foundation for an ethically grounded anthropology ready and able to face the challenges of our contemporary world.

Accounting and Causal Effects: Econometric Challenges (Springer Series in Accounting Scholarship #5)

by Douglas A Schroeder

In this book, we synthesize a rich and vast literature on econometric challenges associated with accounting choices and their causal effects. Identi?cation and es- mation of endogenous causal effects is particularly challenging as observable data are rarely directly linked to the causal effect of interest. A common strategy is to employ logically consistent probability assessment via Bayes’ theorem to connect observable data to the causal effect of interest. For example, the implications of earnings management as equilibrium reporting behavior is a centerpiece of our explorations. Rather than offering recipes or algorithms, the book surveys our - periences with accounting and econometrics. That is, we focus on why rather than how. The book can be utilized in a variety of venues. On the surface it is geared - ward graduate studies and surely this is where its roots lie. If we’re serious about our studies, that is, if we tackle interesting and challenging problems, then there is a natural progression. Our research addresses problems that are not well - derstood then incorporates them throughout our curricula as our understanding improves and to improve our understanding (in other words, learning and c- riculum development are endogenous). For accounting to be a vibrant academic discipline, we believe it is essential these issues be confronted in the undergr- uate classroom as well as graduate studies. We hope we’ve made some progress with examples which will encourage these developments.

Accounting for Capitalism: The World the Clerk Made

by Michael Zakim

The clerk attended his desk and counter at the intersection of two great themes of modern historical experience: the development of a market economy and of a society governed from below. Who better illustrates the daily practice and production of this modernity than someone of no particular account assigned with overseeing all the new buying and selling? In Accounting for Capitalism, Michael Zakim has written their story, a social history of capital that seeks to explain how the “bottom line” became a synonym for truth in an age shorn of absolutes, grafted onto our very sense of reason and trust. This is a big story, told through an ostensibly marginal event: the birth of a class of “merchant clerks” in the United States in the middle of the nineteenth century. The personal trajectory of these young men from farm to metropolis, homestead to boarding house, and, most significantly, from growing things to selling them exemplified the enormous social effort required to domesticate the profit motive and turn it into the practical foundation of civic life. As Zakim reveals in his highly original study, there was nothing natural or preordained about the stunning ascendance of this capitalism and its radical transformation of the relationship between “Man and Mammon.”

Accounting for health: Calculation, paperwork, and medicine, 1500–2000 (Social Histories of Medicine)

by David Cantor

Whether in the Swiss countryside or in a doctor's office in Boston, in German, English or French hospitals or within multinational organizations, with early vaccinations or with new pharmaceuticals from Big Pharma today, or in early modern Saxon mining towns or in Prussian military healthcare – for at least 500 years, accounting has been an essential part of medical practice with significant moral, social and epistemological implications. Covering the period between 1500–2000, the book examines in short case studies the importance of calculative practices for medicine in very different contexts. Thus, Accounting for Health offers a synopsis of the extent to which accounting not only influenced medical practices over centuries, but shaped modern medicine as a whole.

Accounting for health: Calculation, paperwork, and medicine, 1500–2000 (Social Histories of Medicine)

by David Cantor

Whether in the Swiss countryside or in a doctor's office in Boston, in German, English or French hospitals or within multinational organizations, with early vaccinations or with new pharmaceuticals from Big Pharma today, or in early modern Saxon mining towns or in Prussian military healthcare – for at least 500 years, accounting has been an essential part of medical practice with significant moral, social and epistemological implications. Covering the period between 1500–2000, the book examines in short case studies the importance of calculative practices for medicine in very different contexts. Thus, Accounting for Health offers a synopsis of the extent to which accounting not only influenced medical practices over centuries, but shaped modern medicine as a whole.

Accreditation and Evaluation in the European Higher Education Area (Higher Education Dynamics #5)

by Don F. Westerheijden Stefanie Schwarz

This volume presents a rich account of the development of accreditation and evaluation in 20 European countries. It shows how accreditation is becoming a main mechanism in the steering of higher education across Europe. The book is unique in its analysis of forces driving towards the spread of different models of accreditation in the emerging European Higher Education area.

Acetogenesis (Chapman & Hall Microbiology Series)

by Harold L. Drake

This is the first volume to provide comprehensive coverage of acetogenesis. Leading experts present state-of-the-art research, investigating the structure and function relationship of key acetogenic processes, including synthesis of ATP, the conservation of energy, and intersecting metabolic pathways. It explores the interactions between acetogenic bacteria and the flow of matter and energy, giving the reader an integrated perspective on acetogens and the environment. It presents landmark advances in the biochemistry, phylogeny, and molecular biology of acetogens, with lucid explanations of background material, making this volume accessible to newcomers to the subject. It discusses diverse functions of acetogenesis in soils, and gastrointestinal tracts, as well as current and potential commercial and environmental applications. This volume will serve as a broad and in-depth review of basic and emerging issues in acetogenesis for microbiologists, molecular biologists, biochemists, and ecologists, and as a stimulus for future research.

ACFT For Dummies

by Angela Papple Johnston

The best standalone resource for the Army Combat Fitness Test As the Army prepares to shift to the new Army Combat Fitness Test (ACFT) from the Army Physical Fitness Test, hundreds of thousands of new and current servicemembers will have to pass a more rigorous and demanding set of physical events to prove they have what it takes to meet the physical demands of an army job. Utilizing the accessible and simple approach that has made the For Dummies series famous the world over, ACFT For Dummies is packed with everything you need to train for and ultimately crush the ACFT. Topics include: An overview of the test, including how it fits into your army role How the test is administered (location, equipment, etc.) Instructions on how to perform each of the six events How the ACFT is scored Training for the ACFT on your own time The importance of recovery, including essential stretches How to build your own workout routine Videos for each of the six events with tips for how to train for them The ACFT For Dummies prepares readers to tackle the new, tougher Army fitness test with practical examples and concrete strategies that will push each servicemember to new heights.

ACFT For Dummies

by Angela Papple Johnston

The best standalone resource for the Army Combat Fitness Test As the Army prepares to shift to the new Army Combat Fitness Test (ACFT) from the Army Physical Fitness Test, hundreds of thousands of new and current servicemembers will have to pass a more rigorous and demanding set of physical events to prove they have what it takes to meet the physical demands of an army job. Utilizing the accessible and simple approach that has made the For Dummies series famous the world over, ACFT For Dummies is packed with everything you need to train for and ultimately crush the ACFT. Topics include: An overview of the test, including how it fits into your army role How the test is administered (location, equipment, etc.) Instructions on how to perform each of the six events How the ACFT is scored Training for the ACFT on your own time The importance of recovery, including essential stretches How to build your own workout routine Videos for each of the six events with tips for how to train for them The ACFT For Dummies prepares readers to tackle the new, tougher Army fitness test with practical examples and concrete strategies that will push each servicemember to new heights.

Achieving QTLS status: A guide to demonstrating the Professional Standards

by Ann Gravells Sharron Mansell

If you are considering or working towards QTLS status, this text is for you. Over 20,000 practitioners have achieved QTLS status since 2008. The process was redesigned in 2016 therefore the time is right for a book like this. It will help anyone to understand the Professional Standards, which are used as the basis to gain QTLS status. This new text is a user friendly and clear guide to achieving QTLS status and is linked to the Professional Standards for Teachers and Trainers. Appropriate for anyone who wishes to maintain their practice in accordance with the Professional Standards for Teachers and Trainers Written in an accessible language for anyone aiming to achieve QTLS status, and/or to have parity with QTS Information regarding the minimum core, and observed teaching practice is included The content will help practitioners to have a positive impact upon their job role, their learners, their organisation and their career

Acid Rain - Deposition to Recovery

by Peter Brimblecombe Hiroshi Hara Daniel Houle Martin Novak

This book looks at the sources and composition of the atmosphere and rainfall, with particular attention on acidifying components and those that affect ecosystems. It further widens the subject to look at trace metals. It includes papers on the impact of deposition on soils and forests and the recovery of the natural environment. Work on critical loads makes a contribution to understanding the degree to which deposition must be reduced to limit its impact.

Acidic Deposition and Forest Soils: Context and Case Studies of the Southeastern United States (Ecological Studies #72)

by Dan Binkley Charles T. Driscoll H. Lee Allen Philip Schoeneberger Drew McAvoy

Knowledge in the field of acidic deposition is expanding rapidly, and both ex­ perts and non-experts are challenged to keep up with the latest information. We designed our assessment to include both the basic foundation needed by non­ experts and the detailed information needed by experts. Our assessment in­ cludes background information on acidic deposition (Chapter 1), an in-depth discussion of the nature of soil acidity and ecosystem H+ budgets (Chapter 2), and a summary of rates of deposition in the Southeastern U.S. (Chapter 3). A discussion of the nature of forest soils in the region (Chapter 4) is followed by an overview of previous assessments of soil sensitivity to acidification (Chapter 5). The potential impacts of acidic deposition on forest nutrition are described in the context of the degree of current nutrient limitation on forest productivity (Chap­ ter 6). The results of simulations with the MAGIC model provided evaluations of the likely sensitivity of a variety of soils representative of forest soils in the South (Chapter 7), as well as a test of soil sensitivity criteria. Our synthesis and recommendations for research (Chapter 8) also serve as an executive summary. A complementary volume in the Springer-Verlag Ecological Studies series should be consulted for information on European forests. This volume, Acidic Deposition and Forest Decline in the Fictelgebirge, edited by E.-D. Schultze and O.L. Lange, also provides greater detail on the physiologic responses of trees than we present in our regional assessment.

Acidic Precipitation: Soils, Aquatic Processes, and Lake Acidification (Advances in Environmental Science #4)

by Stephen A. Norton S. E. Lindberg Al Page

various places of the world. Thus, it is hoped that this up-to-date subseries would increase the "awareness" of the world's citizens and encourage governments to devote more attention and resources to address this issue. The series editors thank the international panel of contributors for bringing this timely series into completion. We also wish to acknowledge the very insightful input of the following colleagues: Prof. A. L. Page ofthe University of California, Prof. T. C. Hutchinson of the University of Toronto, and Dr. Steve Lindberg of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We also wish to thank the superb effort and cooperation of the volume editors in handling their respective volumes. The constructive criticisms of chapter reviewers also deserve much appreciation. Finally, we wish to convey our appreciation to my secretary, Ms. Brenda Rosier, and my technician, Ms. Claire Carlson, for their very able assistance in various aspects of this series. Aiken, South Carolina Domy C. Adriano Coordinating Editor Preface to Acidic Precipitation, Volume 4 (Advances in Environmental Science) Acidic precipitation and its effects have been the focus ofintense research for over two decades. Initially, research centered on the acidity status and acidification of surface waters and consequent impact on the status of sports fisheries; evidence suggested impacts on fisheries in Sweden and Norway, and in North America, in eastern Ontario, Quebec, and in the Adirondack Mountains of New York.

ACLS Study Guide - E-Book: Quick Review Study Guide

by Barbara J Aehlert

Reflecting the 2010 Emergency Cardiovascular Care guidelines, ACLS Study Guide, 4th Edition offers a complete, full-color overview of advanced cardiovascular life support. An easy-to-read approach covers everything from airway management and rhythms and their management to electrical therapy, acute coronary syndromes, and acute stroke. In addition to the latest ACLS treatment algorithms, this edition includes new case studies, new photos and illustrations, a heart rate ruler, and a handy ACLS quick-reference card for use in the field. Written by Barbara Aehlert, ACLS Study Guide is the official textbook for the American Safety & Health Institute ACLS certification course.A pretest and posttest -- each containing 50 questions with answers and rationales -- allow you to check your knowledge prior to and after your study. Chapter objectives preview the main points in each chapter. Stop and Review sections at the end of the chapters help you remember the most important information. ACLS Pearls boxes offer key points and useful tips for clinical practice. Keeping it Simple boxes provide essential information in a clear and concise manner. Ten case studies present real-life clinical situations, allowing you to make decisions based on information in the Preparatory section. Consistent format of case studies includes Objective, Skills to Master, Rhythms to Master, Medications to Master, Related Text Chapters, Essential Actions, and Unacceptable Actions. A heart rate ruler is included to help you interpret ECGs. 4 x 6 pocket-size quick-reference card contains key ACLS algorithms for field use. 100 new and updated photos and illustrations show key ACLS procedures and equipment. Pharmacological interventions are integrated into the chapters for a more cohesive learning experience. New streamlined approach reduces the number of pages and simplifies the information you need to know.

Acolytes of Nature: Defining Natural Science in Germany, 1770-1850

by Denise Phillips

Although many of the practical and intellectual traditions that make up modern science date back centuries, the category of “science” itself is a relative novelty. In the early eighteenth century, the modern German word that would later mean “science,” naturwissenschaft, was not even included in dictionaries. By 1850, however, the term was in use everywhere. Acolytes of Nature follows the emergence of this important new category within German-speaking Europe, tracing its rise from an insignificant eighteenth-century neologism to a defining rallying cry of modern German culture. Today’s notion of a unified natural science has been deemed an invention of the mid-nineteenth century. Yet what Denise Phillips reveals here is that the idea of naturwissenschaft acquired a prominent place in German public life several decades earlier. Phillips uncovers the evolving outlines of the category of natural science and examines why Germans of varied social station and intellectual commitments came to find this label useful. An expanding education system, an increasingly vibrant consumer culture and urban social life, the early stages of industrialization, and the emergence of a liberal political movement all fundamentally altered the world in which educated Germans lived, and also reshaped the way they classified knowledge.

Acoustic Signal Processing for Telecommunication (The Springer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science #551)

by Jacob Benesty Steven L. Gay

158 2. Wiener Filtering 159 3. Speech Enhancement by Short-Time Spectral Modification 3. 1 Short-Time Fourier Analysis and Synthesis 159 160 3. 2 Short-Time Wiener Filter 161 3. 3 Power Subtraction 3. 4 Magnitude Subtraction 162 3. 5 Parametric Wiener Filtering 163 164 3. 6 Review and Discussion Averaging Techniques for Envelope Estimation 169 4. 169 4. 1 Moving Average 170 4. 2 Single-Pole Recursion 170 4. 3 Two-Sided Single-Pole Recursion 4. 4 Nonlinear Data Processing 171 5. Example Implementation 172 5. 1 Subband Filter Bank Architecture 172 173 5. 2 A-Posteriori-SNR Voice Activity Detector 5. 3 Example 175 6. Conclusion 175 Part IV Microphone Arrays 10 Superdirectional Microphone Arrays 181 Gary W. Elko 1. Introduction 181 2. Differential Microphone Arrays 182 3. Array Directional Gain 192 4. Optimal Arrays for Spherically Isotropic Fields 193 4. 1 Maximum Gain for Omnidirectional Microphones 193 4. 2 Maximum Directivity Index for Differential Microphones 195 4. 3 Maximimum Front-to-Back Ratio 197 4. 4 Minimum Peak Directional Response 200 4. 5 Beamwidth 201 5. Design Examples 201 5. 1 First-Order Designs 202 5. 2 Second-Order Designs 207 5. 3 Third-Order Designs 216 5. 4 Higher-Order designs 221 6. Optimal Arrays for Cylindrically Isotropic Fields 222 6. 1 Maximum Gain for Omnidirectional Microphones 222 6. 2 Optimal Weights for Maximum Directional Gain 224 6. 3 Solution for Optimal Weights for Maximum Front-to-Back Ratio for Cylindrical Noise 225 7. Sensitivity to Microphone Mismatch and Noise 230 8.

Acoustical and Environmental Robustness in Automatic Speech Recognition (The Springer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science #201)

by A. Acero

The need for automatic speech recognition systems to be robust with respect to changes in their acoustical environment has become more widely appreciated in recent years, as more systems are finding their way into practical applications. Although the issue of environmental robustness has received only a small fraction of the attention devoted to speaker independence, even speech recognition systems that are designed to be speaker independent frequently perform very poorly when they are tested using a different type of microphone or acoustical environment from the one with which they were trained. The use of microphones other than a "close­ talking" headset also tends to severely degrade speech recognition -performance. Even in relatively quiet office environments, speech is degraded by additive noise from fans, slamming doors, and other conversations, as well as by the effects of unknown linear filtering arising reverberation from surface reflections in a room, or spectral shaping by microphones or the vocal tracts of individual speakers. Speech-recognition systems designed for long-distance telephone lines, or applications deployed in more adverse acoustical environments such as motor vehicles, factory floors, oroutdoors demand far greaterdegrees ofenvironmental robustness. There are several different ways of building acoustical robustness into speech recognition systems. Arrays of microphones can be used to develop a directionally-sensitive system that resists intelference from competing talkers and other noise sources that are spatially separated from the source of the desired speech signal.

Acoustical Imaging: Volume 29 (Acoustical Imaging #29)

by Iwaki Akiyama

The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: (1) Strain Imaging, (2) Biological and Medical Applications, (3) Acoustic Microscopy, (4) Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications, (5) Components and Systems, (6) Geophysics and Underwater Imaging, (7) Physics and Mathematics, (8) Medical Image Analysis, (9) FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations.

Acoustical Imaging: Volume 28 (Acoustical Imaging #28)

by Michael P. André

Since 1968, the International Acoustical Imaging Symposium has provided a unique forum for advanced research, promoting the sharing of technology, developments, methods and theory among all areas of acoustics. Volume 28 of the Proceedings offers an excellent collection of papers presented in six major categories, offering both a broad perspective on the state of the art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research.

Acoustical Imaging (Acoustical Imaging #12)

by Eric Ash

The formation of images by ultrasound is a fascinating study, with well-established, yet rapidly growing, applic­ ations in medicine and with increasing relevance to a surprisingly disparate set of problems in the non-destructive examination of materials and components. The present volume is a record of the research presented at the Twelfth International Symposium on Acoustic Imaging, held in London during July 1982. Whilst, therefore, it offers primarily a snap-shot in time of a rapidly developing field, it is so organized that it will also serve as a high-speed entry into the literature for someone embarking, for the first time, on· researches in this branch of applied science. As in previous volumes, some of the work reported is concerned with topics which, whilst of critical importance to the performance of any imaging system, - e.g. transducers, signal processing may not address themselves to image formation per se. A new departure is the inclusion of photo-acoustic imaging a subject of rapidly growing importance for many of the same application areas relevant to acoustical imaging.

Acoustical Imaging (Acoustical Imaging #19)

by Helmut Ermert Hans-Peter Harjes

This book constitutes the proceedings of the 19th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging at the Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany during April 3 -5, 1991. It was the first time that the symposium was held in Europe after major political changes happened in that area. The freedom to travel for all people from eastern European countries was an obvious reason for the great numbers of sub­ mitted abstracts and for numerous conference participants. 193 of 239 submitted contributions from 29 countries were accepted for presentation by authors from USA (13%), Canada (2%), Japan (7%), Peoples Republic of China (7%), United Kingdom (4%), France (7%), Italy (3%), Poland (4%), Soviet Union (7%), Germany (28%) and other countries (18%). 283 scientists from 29 countries attended the conference representing the interdisciplinary field between mathematics, physics, engineering and medicine. 151 papers were available for publication in this proceedings covering the topics 1. Mathematics and Physics of Acoustical Imaging 2. Components and Systems 3. Applications in Medicine and Biology 4. Applications in Nondestructive Testing 5. Remote Sensing Applications 6. Industrial Applications A relative large number of contributions on acoustical microscopy was included in the conference program within topics 3 and 4. Also, papers on "non-traditional" acoustical imaging subjects, e. g. on phonon imaging and on remote sensing in the atmosphere, have broadened the scope of the conference. The success and stimulation of the conference and of the papers presented in this volume is owed, of course to the authors and participants.

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