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1066: History In An Hour (The\history In An Hour Ser.)

by Kaye Jones

Love history? Know your stuff with History in an Hour.

1066: The Year Of Three Battles

by Frank McLynn

Everyone knows what William the Conqueror won the Battle of Hastings in 1066, but in recent years is has become customary to assume that the victory was virtually inevitable, given the alleged superiority of Norman military technology. In this new study, underpinned by biographical sketches of the great warriors who fought for the crown of England in 1066, Frank McLynn shows that this view is mistaken. The battle on Senlac Hill on 14 October was a desperately close-run thing, which Harold lost only because of an incredible run of bad fortune and some treachery from the Saxon elite in England. Both William and Harold were fine generals, but Harold was the more inspirational of the two. Making use of all the latest scholarship, McLynn shows that most of our 'knowledge' of 1066 rests on myths or illusions: Harold did not fight at Hastings with the same army with which he had been victorious at Stamford Bridge three weeks earlier; the Battle of Senlac was not won by Norman archery; Harold did not die with an arrow in the eye. In overturning these myths, McLynn shows that the truth is even more astonishing than the legend. An original feature of the book is the space devoted to the career and achievements of Harald Hardrada, who usually appears in such narratives as the shadowy 'third man'. McLynn shows that he was probably the greatest warrior of the three and that he, in turn, lost a battle through unforeseen circumstances.

1066 (PDF)

by Jim Eldridge

I Was There. . . is a perfect introduction for younger readers into stories from the past, allowing children to imagine that they were really there. I Was There. . . 1066 tells the thrilling story of a young page boy at the heart of the Battle of Hastings. Edwin risks everything to infiltrate the Norman army and find out William of Normany's plans for King Harold. Brilliantly reimagined and tied in with the new primary curriculum, readers aged 7+ will love this vivid and exciting first-hand account of the last successful military invasion of England.

11.22.63: Enhanced Edition

by Stephen King

Now a major TV series from JJ Abrams and Stephen King, starring James Franco (Hulu US, Fox UK and Europe, Stan Australia, SKY New Zealand).WHAT IF you could go back in time and change the course of history? WHAT IF the watershed moment you could change was the JFK assassination? 11.22.63, the date that Kennedy was shot - unless . . . King takes his protagonist Jake Epping, a high school English teacher from Lisbon Falls, Maine, 2011, on a fascinating journey back to 1958 - from a world of mobile phones and iPods to a new world of Elvis and JFK, of Plymouth Fury cars and Lindy Hopping, of a troubled loner named Lee Harvey Oswald and a beautiful high school librarian named Sadie Dunhill, who becomes the love of Jake's life - a life that transgresses all the normal rules of time.With extraordinary imaginative power, King weaves the social, political and popular culture of his baby-boom American generation into a devastating exercise in escalating suspense.

11 September 2001: War, Terror and Judgement

by Bülent Gökay R.b.j.walker

In a comprehensive study of the world since September 11th, 2001, the contributors to this volume offer a series of perspectives on current security trends. The scholars who participated in this study are from Europe, North America and Asia.

11 September 2001: War, Terror and Judgement

by Bulent Gokay R. B. J. Walker

In a comprehensive study of the world since September 11th, 2001, the contributors to this volume offer a series of perspectives on current security trends. The scholars who participated in this study are from Europe, North America and Asia.

11 September and its Aftermath: The Geopolitics of Terror

by Stanley D. Brunn

First published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

11 September and its Aftermath: The Geopolitics of Terror

by Stanley D. Brunn

First published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

110 Turn-of-the-Century House Designs

by R. W. Shoppell

With its wealth of representative styles and its emphasis on craftsmanship and exterior design, the late-Victorian era ranks among the halcyon days in American house building. This survey of the era's traditional designs--reproduced from a rare edition--offers a complete and authentic guide to faithful restorations or re-creations.A New York City-based firm prepared and published this catalog in 1897, selecting the very best models from more than 12,000 houses built from their plans. Designed with style, utility, and low cost of construction uppermost in mind, it features hundreds of illustrations, including perspective drawings and floor plans. Details of interior and exterior materials and potential modifications include remarks on the particular amenities of each house, plus estimates of building costs. Antique collectors, home hobbyists, and fans of traditional design will find this volume a valuable reference and an endless source of inspiration.

1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed (Turning Points in Ancient History)

by Eric H. Cline

In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium B.C., which had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia, suddenly ceased to exist, along with writing systems, technology, and monumental architecture. But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown. How did it happen?In this major new account of the causes of this "First Dark Ages," Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries.A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age—and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece.

1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed (Turning Points in Ancient History)

by Eric H. Cline

In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium B.C., which had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia, suddenly ceased to exist, along with writing systems, technology, and monumental architecture. But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown. How did it happen?In this major new account of the causes of this "First Dark Ages," Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries.A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age—and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece.

1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed: Revised and Updated (Turning Points In Ancient History Ser. #2)

by Eric H. Cline

From acclaimed archaeologist and bestselling author Eric Cline, a breathtaking account of how the collapse of an ancient civilized world ushered in the first Dark AgesIn 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy defeated them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, famine, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life a vibrant multicultural world, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires of the age and shows that it may have been their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse. Now revised and updated, 1177 B.C. sheds light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and eventually destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age—and set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece and, ultimately, our world today.

1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed: Revised and Updated

by Eric H. Cline

From acclaimed archaeologist and bestselling author Eric Cline, a breathtaking account of how the collapse of an ancient civilized world ushered in the first Dark AgesIn 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy defeated them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, famine, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life a vibrant multicultural world, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires of the age and shows that it may have been their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse. Now revised and updated, 1177 B.C. sheds light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and eventually destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age—and set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece and, ultimately, our world today.

12 Books That Changed The World: How words and wisdom have shaped our lives

by Melvyn Bragg

When we think of great events in the history of the world, we tend to think of war, revolution, political upheaval or natural catastrophe. But throughout history there have been moments of vital importance that have taken place not on the battlefield, or in the palaces of power, or even in the violence of nature, but between the pages of a book. In our digitised age of instant information it is easy to underestimate the power of the printed word. In his fascinating book, Melvyn Bragg presents a vivid reminder of the book as agent of social, political and personal revolution. 12 Books that Changed the World presents a rich variety of human endeavour and a great diversity of characters. There are also surprises. Here are famous books by Darwin, Newton and Shakespeare - but we also discover the stories behind some less well-known works, such as Marie Stopes' Married Love, the original radical feminist Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Woman - and even the rules to an obscure ball game that became the most popular sport in the world . . .

12 Years a Slave: A True Story (PDF) (Collins Classics Ser.)

by Solomon Northup

The shocking first-hand account of one man’s remarkable fight for freedom; now an award-winning motion picture. ‘Why had I not died in my young years – before God had given me children to love and live for? What unhappiness and suffering and sorrow it would have prevented. I sighed for liberty; but the bondsman's chain was round me, and could not be shaken off.’ 1841: Solomon Northup is a successful violinist when he is kidnapped and sold into slavery. Taken from his family in New York State – with no hope of ever seeing them again – and forced to work on the cotton plantations in the Deep South, he spends the next twelve years in captivity until his eventual escape in 1853. First published in 1853, this extraordinary true story proved to be a powerful voice in the debate over slavery in the years leading up to the Civil War. It is a true-life testament of one man’s courage and conviction in the face of unfathomable injustice and brutality: its influence on the course of American history cannot be overstated.

1215: The Year Of Magna Carta

by John Gillingham Danny Danziger

On 15 June 1215, rebel barons forced King John to meet them at Runnymede. They did not trust the King, so he was not allowed to leave until his seal was attached to the charter in front of him. This was Magna Carta. It was a revolutionary document. Never before had royal authority been so fundamentally challenged. Nearly 800 years later, two of the charter's sixty-three clauses are still a ringing expression of freedom for mankind: 'To no one will we sell, to no one will we deny or delay right or justice'. And: 'No free man shall be taken or imprisoned or in any way ruined, except by the lawful judgement of his peers or by the law of the land'. 1215 - The Year of Magna Carta explores what it was like to be alive in that momentous year. Political power struggles are interwoven with other issues - fashion, food, education, medicine, religion, sex. In many areas it was a time of innovation and change. Windmills were erected, spectacles were invented. Dozens of new towns were founded. Oxford became the first university in England, and the great cathedrals of Salisbury and Lincoln were built. Whether describing matters of state or domestic life, this is a treasure house of a book, rich in detail and full of enthralling insights into the medieval world.

124 Distinctive House Designs and Floor Plans, 1929

by National Building Publications

An annual publication intended as a reference work for contractors, suppliers, architects, and homeowners, the 1929 Home Builders Catalog offered a beautifully illustrated look at a variety of homes. Painstakingly reproduced from a rare edition, this volume offers old-house restorers, preservationists, and lovers of 1920s architecture an authentic view of American homes of the era.

13 Days: The Cuban Missile Crisis October 1962 (PDF)

by Robert F. Kennedy

The Cuban Missile Crisis October 1962

13 Hours: The explosive true story of how six men fought a terror attack and repelled enemy forces

by Mitchell Zuckoff

13 HOURS is the true account of the events of 11 September 2012, when terrorists attacked a US State Compound and a nearby CIA station in Libya, one of the most dangerous corners of the globe. On that fateful day, a team of six American security operators stationed in Benghazi fought to repel mounting enemy forces and escalating firepower, to protect the Americans stationed there, including the US Ambassador to Libya Christopher Stevens. Going beyond the call of duty, the team ignored orders to stand down and instead choked back smoke, fought wave after wave of machine-gun fire and retook the Compound, averting tragedy on a much larger scale – although four Americans would not make it out alive. Recounting the 13 hours of the now infamous attack, this personal account is both blistering and compelling, and sets the story straight about what really happened on the ground, in the streets and on the rooftops.

130 Years of Medicine in Hong Kong: From the College of Medicine for Chinese to the Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine

by Frank Ching

This book reviews the medical history of Hong Kong, beginning with its birth as a British colony. It introduces the origins of Hong Kong’s medical education, which began in 1887 when the London Missionary Society set up the Hong Kong College of Medicine for Chinese. When the University of Hong Kong was established in 1911, the College became its medical faculty. The faculty has gained distinction over the years for innovative surgical techniques, for discovering the SARS virus and for its contribution to advances in medical and health sciences. This book is meant for general readers as well as medical practitioners. It is a work for anyone interested in Hong Kong or in medical education.

1314 And All That (And All That Ser.)

by Scoular Anderson

This history of Scotland addresses the questions that other texts ignore, such as: was Bannockburn a cake?; how bonnie was Prince Charlie?; and wha's like us? Combining accuracy and humour, this is Scottish history from a different angle.

1356: A Novel

by Bernard Cornwell

Go with God and Fight Like the Devil. The remarkable new novel by Britain’s master storyteller, which culminates at the Battle of Poitiers.

1356 (Special Edition): A Novel

by Bernard Cornwell

This special edition Ebook features exclusive extra content by the author, with an extended Historical Note and two contemporary accounts of the Battle of Poitiers.

1381: The Year of the Peasants' Revolt

by Juliet Barker

Juliet Barker provides an account of the first great popular uprising in England and a fascinating study of medieval life in English towns and countryside. She tells how and why an unlikely group of ordinary men and women from every corner of England united in armed rebellion against church and state to demand a radical political agenda.

1381: The Year of the Peasants' Revolt

by Juliet Barker

Juliet Barker provides an account of the first great popular uprising in England and a fascinating study of medieval life in English towns and countryside. She tells how and why an unlikely group of ordinary men and women from every corner of England united in armed rebellion against church and state to demand a radical political agenda.

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