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Australia's Worst Disasters

by Malcolm Brown

Graphic accounts of Australia’s worst disasters – historical as well as events of recent years.From the Ash Wednesday bushfires of 1983 to the implosion of the Royal Canberra Hospital in 1997, and from the shocking Granville railway crash in 1977 to the Sea King helicopter crash of 2005, Australia's history has been punctuated by incidents of disaster and tragedy that have shocked us all. Sometimes warning signs were not read (or were ignored); sometimes human error was to blame. These graphic and compelling accounts by veteran Sydney Morning Herald journalist Malcolm Brown and other award-winning journalists tell us far more than simply what happened - they provide unique insights into the impact of these events on the lives of innocent people. And, interspersed with stories of death and destruction, are heart-warming accounts of courage, grace and just plain good luck.

Contemporary Issues in Australian Literature: International Perspectives

by David Callahan

The contemporary study of Australian literature ranges widely across issues of general cultural studies, the politics of identity (both ethnic and gendered), and the position of Australia within wider postcolonial contexts. This volume intervenes in the most significant of issues in these areas from a variety of international perspectives.

Contemporary Issues in Australian Literature: International Perspectives

by David Callahan

The contemporary study of Australian literature ranges widely across issues of general cultural studies, the politics of identity (both ethnic and gendered), and the position of Australia within wider postcolonial contexts. This volume intervenes in the most significant of issues in these areas from a variety of international perspectives.

Economic Relations Between Britain and Australia from the 1940s-196 (Cambridge Imperial and Post-Colonial Studies)

by Paul Robertson J. Singleton

In the early postwar era, Britain enjoyed a very close economic relationship with Australia and New Zealand through their common membership of the Sterling Area and the Commonwealth Preference Area. This book examines the breakdown of this relationship in the 1950 and 1960s. Britain and Australasia were driven apart by disputes over industrial protection, agriculture, capital supplies, and relations with other countries. Special emphasis is given to the implications for Australia and New Zealand of Britain's growing interest in European integration.

Redefining the Bonds of Commonwealth, 1939-1948: The Politics of Preference (Cambridge Imperial and Post-Colonial Studies)

by F. McKenzie

This work is a path-breaking study of the changing attitudes of Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa to Britain and the Commonwealth in the 1940s and the effect of those changes on their individual and collective standing in international affairs. The focus is imperial preference, the largest discriminatory tariff system in the world and a potent symbol of Commonwealth unity. It is based on archival research in Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the United States.

Beyond the Black Stump: Travels around Australia

by Andrew Stevenson

A seasoned traveller, travel writer Andrew Stevenson is unafraid of the unconventional. Whilst most people visiting Australia tread the well worn path from the Sydney Opera House to Cairns up the East Coast, Andrew disappeared into the Australian outback in search of the original Australians - the Aboriginal People."If you want to meet them nowadays, you've got to go beyond the black stump!" He was told. Going where few have gone before, Andrew delves into the Outback without fear. Drinking in bars with people even the locals avoid, asking questions that we all want to hear the answers to.Written with humour and compassion his powers of observation and enquiring mind draw out a frankness that is sometimes shocking but something from which we can all learn. Beyond the Black Stump: Travels around Australia is no ordinary tale of an intrepid traveller, it is an extraordinary account of an Australia that we have not seen before.

The Book of My Enemy: Collected Verse 1958-2003

by Clive James

The reputation of Clive James as a poet was slow to form, perhaps because he was too famous as a star journalist and television entertainer. There was also the drawback that his poetry was so entertaining it was hard for many critics to take seriously. But after the notoriety achieved by a single self-satirizing poem, ‘The Book of My Enemy Has Been Remaindered’, one of the most anthologized poems of recent times, James’s poetic output became impossible to ignore, and his 1985 collection Other Passports was greeted with praise for its thematic scope and technical accomplishment, even by critics who still doubted his seriousness. Since then, James has emerged unarguably as one of the most prominent poets of his generation – and The Book of My Enemy (which includes Other Passports) shows why.

Britain, Australia, New Zealand and the Challenge of the United States, 1939–46: A Study in International History (Studies in Military and Strategic History)

by P. Orders

This book relates the development of Anglo-Australian-New Zealand relations during and immediately after the second world war to the role of the United States in the South-west Pacific. Based on the results of comprehensive multi-archival research, the book highlights the extent of American-Commonwealth rivalry in the region and following the crisis of late 1941 and early 1942 demonstrates how the reforging of imperial links was shaped by the expansion of American power in Pacific areas south of the equator. It provides an important and timely reassessment of the economic, political and strategic factors that led Britain, Australia and New Zealand to conclude that the postwar affairs of the South-west Pacific should be dominated by the British Empire.

Middle Class Culture in the Nineteenth Century: America, Australia and Britain

by L. Young

Drawing on expressive and material culture, Young shows that money was not enough to make the genteel middle class. It required exquisite self-control and the right cultural capital to perform ritual etiquette and present oneself confidently, yet modestly. She argues that genteel culture was not merely derivative, but a re-working of aristocratic standards in the context of the middle class necessity to work. Visible throughout the English-speaking world in the 1780s -1830s and onward, genteel culture reveals continuities often obscured by studies based entirely on national frameworks.

The Military Dimension: Volume III: The Military Dimension (The History of Anglo-Japanese Relations, 1600-2000)

by J. Chapman I. Gow Y. Hirama

The five volumes in the series entitled The History of Anglo-Japanese Relations, 1600-2000 explore the history of the relationship between Britain and Japan from the first contacts of the early 1600s through to the end of the twentieth century. This volume presents 19 original essays by Japanese, British and other international historians and covers the evolving military relationship from the 19th century through to the end of the 20th century. The main focus is on the interwar period when both military establishments shifted from collaboration to conflict, as well as wartime issues such as the treatment of POWs seen from both sides, the Occupation of Japan and war crimes trials.

Pacific Asia

by Yumei Zhang

Pacific Asia has witnessed arguably the most dynamic economic growth and social transformation in the world since 1945. Inspired by the example of Japan, a number of high performing economies have emerged in the region. Pacific Asia explores this extraordinary pace of development and explains the various factors that lie behind it. It introduces the complex politics of development and sets Pacific Asia in its geographical and socio-cultural context. As well as Japan, the role model of development, Pacific Asia examines the experiences of Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan.

Pacific Asia

by Yumei Zhang

Pacific Asia has witnessed arguably the most dynamic economic growth and social transformation in the world since 1945. Inspired by the example of Japan, a number of high performing economies have emerged in the region. Pacific Asia explores this extraordinary pace of development and explains the various factors that lie behind it. It introduces the complex politics of development and sets Pacific Asia in its geographical and socio-cultural context. As well as Japan, the role model of development, Pacific Asia examines the experiences of Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan.

Australian Sport - Better by Design?: The Evolution of Australian Sport Policy

by Bob Stewart Aaron Smith Matthew Nicholson Hans Westerbeek

Australians have invested an enormous amount of emotional and physical capital in their sporting systems and structures. While Australian sport has many times been dissected from a historical and cultural perspective, there is little detailed analysis of sport's relationship with government.The book focuses on sport policy, and examines the ways in which government has affected the development of Australian sport since 1919. The text identifies the political, economic and cultural context in which policies were set, and examines critical policy shifts. The book also provides a strong theoretical foundation by first discussing the underlying principles of policy formulation, and second, the rationale for government intervention in national sport. It includes a number of sport policy case studies, with particular attention to the following topics:- Elite and Community sport development- Trends in participation and sport fan preferences - Problems in attracting young people to sport participation- Improving the management systems of sporting bodies- Government policy on sport broadcasting- Tools for evaluating sport policyProviding a unique blend of theory, history and practice, this text provides an essential foundation for sport policy analysis and will be read by students of sport studies and sport management as well as professionals with an interest in sport development.

Australian Sport - Better by Design?: The Evolution of Australian Sport Policy

by Bob Stewart Aaron Smith Matthew Nicholson Hans Westerbeek

Australians have invested an enormous amount of emotional and physical capital in their sporting systems and structures. While Australian sport has many times been dissected from a historical and cultural perspective, there is little detailed analysis of sport's relationship with government.The book focuses on sport policy, and examines the ways in which government has affected the development of Australian sport since 1919. The text identifies the political, economic and cultural context in which policies were set, and examines critical policy shifts. The book also provides a strong theoretical foundation by first discussing the underlying principles of policy formulation, and second, the rationale for government intervention in national sport. It includes a number of sport policy case studies, with particular attention to the following topics:- Elite and Community sport development- Trends in participation and sport fan preferences - Problems in attracting young people to sport participation- Improving the management systems of sporting bodies- Government policy on sport broadcasting- Tools for evaluating sport policyProviding a unique blend of theory, history and practice, this text provides an essential foundation for sport policy analysis and will be read by students of sport studies and sport management as well as professionals with an interest in sport development.

Colloquial Thai: The Complete Course For Beginners (Colloquial Ser.)

by John Moore Saowalak Rodchue

Colloquial Thai: The Complete Course for Beginners has been carefully developed by an experienced teacher to provide a step-by-step course to Thai as it is written and spoken today. Combining a clear, practical and accessible style with a methodical and thorough treatment of the language, it equips learners with the essential skills needed to communicate confidently and effectively in Thai in a broad range of situations. No prior knowledge of the language is required. Colloquial Thai is exceptional; each unit presents a wealth of grammatical points that are reinforced with a wide range of exercises for regular practice. A full answer key, a grammar summary, bilingual glossaries and English translations of dialogues can be found at the back as well as useful vocabulary lists throughout. Key features include: A clear, user-friendly format designed to help learners progressively build up their speaking, listening, reading and writing skills Jargon-free, succinct and clearly structured explanations of grammar An extensive range of focused and dynamic supportive exercises Realistic and entertaining dialogues covering a broad variety of narrative situations Helpful cultural points explaining the customs and features of life in Thailand. An overview of the sounds of Thai Balanced, comprehensive and rewarding, Colloquial Thai is an indispensable resource both for independent learners and students taking courses in Thai. Audio material to accompany the course is available to download free in MP3 format from www.routledge.com/cw/colloquials. Recorded by native speakers, the audio material features the dialogues and texts from the book and will help develop your listening and pronunciation skills.

Colloquial Thai

by John Moore Saowalak Rodchue

Colloquial Thai: The Complete Course for Beginners has been carefully developed by an experienced teacher to provide a step-by-step course to Thai as it is written and spoken today. Combining a clear, practical and accessible style with a methodical and thorough treatment of the language, it equips learners with the essential skills needed to communicate confidently and effectively in Thai in a broad range of situations. No prior knowledge of the language is required. Colloquial Thai is exceptional; each unit presents a wealth of grammatical points that are reinforced with a wide range of exercises for regular practice. A full answer key, a grammar summary, bilingual glossaries and English translations of dialogues can be found at the back as well as useful vocabulary lists throughout. Key features include: A clear, user-friendly format designed to help learners progressively build up their speaking, listening, reading and writing skills Jargon-free, succinct and clearly structured explanations of grammar An extensive range of focused and dynamic supportive exercises Realistic and entertaining dialogues covering a broad variety of narrative situations Helpful cultural points explaining the customs and features of life in Thailand. An overview of the sounds of Thai Balanced, comprehensive and rewarding, Colloquial Thai is an indispensable resource both for independent learners and students taking courses in Thai. Audio material to accompany the course is available to download free in MP3 format from www.routledge.com/cw/colloquials. Recorded by native speakers, the audio material features the dialogues and texts from the book and will help develop your listening and pronunciation skills.

Country: A Continent, a Scientist and a Kangaroo (Best Of Country Ser.)

by Tim Flannery

In his most thrilling and personal book, Tim Flannery writes a love letter to his homeland, drawing on three decades of extensive travel, research and field work to reveal its unique nature. Flannery shows how the kangaroo is inseparable from the environment that created it. And he reveals the vast continent to be a land of subtlety and complexity that becomes comprehensible to those who take the time to learn its hidden and ancient languages.

Empowering the Past, Confronting the Future: The Duna People of Papua New Guinea (Contemporary Anthropology of Religion)

by Pamela J. Stewart Andrew J. Strathern

How have the Aluni Valley Duna people of Papua New Guinea responded to the challenges of colonial and post-colonial changes that have entered their lifeworld since the middle of the Twentieth-Century? Living in a corner of the world influenced by mining companies but relatively neglected in terms of government-sponsored development, these people have dealt creatively with forces of change by redeploying their own mythological themes about the cosmos in order to make claims on outside corporations and by subtly combining features of their customary practices with forms of Christianity, attempting to empower their past as a means of confronting the future.

The Mughals of India (Peoples of Asia #5)

by Harbans Mukhia

This innovative book explores of the grandest and longest lasting empire in Indian history. Examines the history of the Mughal presence in India from 1526 to the mid-eighteenth century Creates a new framework for understanding the Mughal empire by addressing themes that have not been explored before. Subtly traces the legacy of the Mughals’ world in today’s India.

The Persians (Peoples of Asia #6)

by Gene R. Garthwaite

The Persians is a succinct narrative of Iranian history from the time of Cyrus the Great in 560BC to the present day. A succinct narrative of Iranian history from the time of Cyrus the Great in 560BC to the present day. Traces events from the rise of the Persian empire, through competition with Rome and conquest by the Arabs, through to the re-establishment of a Persian state in the sixteenth century, and finally the Islamic Revoltuion on 1979 and the establishment of the current Islamic Republic. Uses the most recent scholarship to examine Iran's political, social and cultural history. Focuses on rulership as a central theme in Iranian identity. Also shows how land, language and literature relate to Iranian identity.

Tales from the Torrid Zone: Travels in the Deep Tropics (Vintage Departures Ser.)

by Alexander Frater

Part memoir, part travelogue, Tales From the Torrid Zone is rooted in Alex Frater's birthplace, the tiny tropical republic of Vanuatu where his father ran its hospital and his mother, in her front garden, built its first school. From this obscure South Seas group he ranges over the hot, wet, beautiful swathe of the world that has haunted him ever since – dines with a tropical queen in a leper colony, makes his way across tropical Africa (and two civil wars) in a forty-four-year-old flying boat, delivers a new church bell to a remote Oceanian island and visits scores of countries to learn about their history, politics, medicine, flora and fauna (including the remarkable role of the coconut in tropical life). But, as becomes plain, the torrid zone is not just a geographical phenomenon, it’s also a state of mind. The result is a witty, entertaining and immensely readable book from a fine storyteller.

Waltzing the Magpies: A Year in Australia

by Sam Pickering

Praise for Sam Pickering: "The art of the essay as delivered by Mr. Pickering is the art of the front porch ramble." ---The New York Times Book Review "Reading Pickering . . . is like taking a walk with your oldest, wittiest friend." ---Smithsonian "What a joy it is to 'mess around' with Professor Sam Pickering!" ---The Chattanooga Times "Pickering is a barefoot observer of the quotidian who revels in the spectacle and its gift for surprise, prefers the rumpled to the starched, has raised puttering and messing about to an art form, and wrings from it more than a pennyworth of happiness and a life well lived." ---Kirkus Reviews The movie Dead Poets Society is where most Americans first met Sam Pickering, the University of Connecticut English professor. Robin Williams plays the lead character (loosely based on Pickering), an idiosyncratic instructor who employs some over-the-top teaching methods to keep his subjects fresh and his students learning. Fewer know that Pickering is the author of more than 16 books and nearly 200 articles, or that he's inspired thousands of university students to think in new ways. And, while Williams may have captured Pickering's madcap classroom antics, he didn't uncover the other side of the author-Sam Pickering as one of our great American men of letters. Like the music of Mozart, the painting of Picasso, or the poetry of Emily Dickinson, you can spot Pickering's writing a mile away; there's no mistaking the Pickering pen. As an ample demonstration of the author's literary gifts, Waltzing the Magpies is his unabashedly lush and Technicolor travelogue from Down Under. On the face of it, Waltzing is the chronicle of a sabbatical year spent with family in Australia. Yet beneath the surface Pickering's big themes-family, nature, seizing the moment-move in a powerful current that frequently bursts out in moments of ecstatic revelation and intense sensual flourish. Through it all Pickering weaves stories from his fictional Southern town of Carthage, Tennessee, especially when the goings of the outside world get rough. Waltzing the Magpies is classic Pickering at the height of his literary powers, and places him in the company of such great American essayists as E. B. White and James Thurber, but with an irony and observational prowess that is pure Pickering.

Australia: Nation, Belonging, and Globalization (Global Realities)

by Anthony Moran

In this book Anthony Moran traces the development of contemporary Australian society in the global age, focusing on four major themes: settler/indigenous relations; economics and culture since the 1980s and their impact on national identity; the effects of increasing diversity fostered by globalization; and the transformation of Australian social space wrought by globalization.

Australia: Nation, Belonging, and Globalization (Global Realities)

by Anthony Moran

In this book Anthony Moran traces the development of contemporary Australian society in the global age, focusing on four major themes: settler/indigenous relations; economics and culture since the 1980s and their impact on national identity; the effects of increasing diversity fostered by globalization; and the transformation of Australian social space wrought by globalization.

Dancing With Strangers: The True History of the Meeting of the British First Fleet and the Aboriginal Australians, 1788

by Inga Clendinnen

In January of 1788 the First Fleet arrived in New South Wales and a thousand British men and women encountered the people who will be their new neighbours; the beach nomads of Australia. "These people mixed with ours," wrote a British observer soon after the landfall, "and all hands danced together." What followed would determine relations between the peoples for the next two hundred years. Drawing skilfully on first-hand accounts and historical records, Inga Clendinnen reconstructs the complex dance of curiosity, attraction and mistrust performed by the protagonists of either side. She brings this key chapter in British colonial history brilliantly alive. Then we discover why the dancing stopped . . .

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