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Brigham Young: Pioneer Prophet

by John G. Turner

Brigham Young was a rough-hewn New York craftsman whose impoverished life was electrified by the Mormon faith. Turner provides a fully realized portrait of this spiritual prophet, viewed by followers as a protector and by opponents as a heretic. His pioneering faith made a deep imprint on tens of thousands of lives in the American Mountain West.

Brigham Young: Pioneer Prophet

by John G. Turner

Brigham Young was a rough-hewn New York craftsman whose impoverished life was electrified by the Mormon faith. Turner provides a fully realized portrait of this spiritual prophet, viewed by followers as a protector and by opponents as a heretic. His pioneering faith made a deep imprint on tens of thousands of lives in the American Mountain West.

The Mormon Jesus: A Biography

by John G. Turner

For two centuries, Jesus has connected the Latter-day Saints to broader currents of Christianity, even while particular Mormon beliefs have been points of differentiation. From the author of the definitive life of Brigham Young comes a biography of the Mormon Jesus that enriches our understanding of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

The Mormon Jesus: A Biography

by John G. Turner

For two centuries, Jesus has connected the Latter-day Saints to broader currents of Christianity, even while particular Mormon beliefs have been points of differentiation. From the author of the definitive life of Brigham Young comes a biography of the Mormon Jesus that enriches our understanding of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

They Knew They Were Pilgrims: Plymouth Colony and the Contest for American Liberty

by John G. Turner

An ambitious new history of the Pilgrims and Plymouth Colony, published for the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower’s landing In 1620, separatists from the Church of England set sail across the Atlantic aboard the Mayflower. Understanding themselves as spiritual pilgrims, they left to preserve their liberty to worship God in accordance with their understanding of the Bible. There exists, however, an alternative, more dispiriting version of their story. In it, the Pilgrims are religious zealots who persecuted dissenters and decimated the Native peoples through warfare and by stealing their land. The Pilgrims’ definition of liberty was, in practice, very narrow. Drawing on original research using underutilized sources, John G. Turner moves beyond these familiar narratives in his sweeping and authoritative new history of Plymouth Colony. Instead of depicting the Pilgrims as otherworldly saints or extraordinary sinners, he tells how a variety of English settlers and Native peoples engaged in a contest for the meaning of American liberty.

The Emergence and Evolution of Religion: By Means of Natural Selection (Evolutionary Analysis in the Social Sciences)

by Jonathan H. Turner Alexandra Maryanski Anders Klostergaard Petersen Armin W. Geertz

Written by leading theorists and empirical researchers, this book presents new ways of addressing the old question: Why did religion first emerge and then continue to evolve in all human societies? The authors of the book—each with a different background across the social sciences and humanities—assimilate conceptual leads and empirical findings from anthropology, evolutionary biology, evolutionary sociology, neurology, primate behavioral studies, explanations of human interaction and group dynamics, and a wide range of religious scholarship to construct a deeper and more powerful explanation of the origins and subsequent evolutionary development of religions than can currently be found in what is now vast literature. While explaining religion has been a central question in many disciplines for a long time, this book draws upon a much wider array of literature to develop a robust and cross-disciplinary analysis of religion. The book remains true to its subtitle by emphasizing an array of both biological and sociocultural forms of selection dynamics that are fundamental to explaining religion as a universal institution in human societies. In addition to Darwinian selection, which can explain the biology and neurology of religion, the book outlines a set of four additional types of sociocultural natural selection that can fill out the explanation of why religion first emerged as an institutional system in human societies, and why it has continued to evolve over the last 300,000 years of societal evolution. These sociocultural forms of natural selection are labeled by the names of the early sociologists who first emphasized them, and they can be seen as a necessary supplement to the type of natural selection theorized by Charles Darwin. Explanations of religion that remain in the shadow cast by Darwin’s great insights will, it is argued, remain narrow and incomplete when explaining a robust sociocultural phenomenon like religion.

The Emergence and Evolution of Religion: By Means of Natural Selection (Evolutionary Analysis in the Social Sciences)

by Jonathan H. Turner Alexandra Maryanski Anders Klostergaard Petersen Armin W. Geertz

Written by leading theorists and empirical researchers, this book presents new ways of addressing the old question: Why did religion first emerge and then continue to evolve in all human societies? The authors of the book—each with a different background across the social sciences and humanities—assimilate conceptual leads and empirical findings from anthropology, evolutionary biology, evolutionary sociology, neurology, primate behavioral studies, explanations of human interaction and group dynamics, and a wide range of religious scholarship to construct a deeper and more powerful explanation of the origins and subsequent evolutionary development of religions than can currently be found in what is now vast literature. While explaining religion has been a central question in many disciplines for a long time, this book draws upon a much wider array of literature to develop a robust and cross-disciplinary analysis of religion. The book remains true to its subtitle by emphasizing an array of both biological and sociocultural forms of selection dynamics that are fundamental to explaining religion as a universal institution in human societies. In addition to Darwinian selection, which can explain the biology and neurology of religion, the book outlines a set of four additional types of sociocultural natural selection that can fill out the explanation of why religion first emerged as an institutional system in human societies, and why it has continued to evolve over the last 300,000 years of societal evolution. These sociocultural forms of natural selection are labeled by the names of the early sociologists who first emphasized them, and they can be seen as a necessary supplement to the type of natural selection theorized by Charles Darwin. Explanations of religion that remain in the shadow cast by Darwin’s great insights will, it is argued, remain narrow and incomplete when explaining a robust sociocultural phenomenon like religion.

On the Resurrection of the Dead: A New Metaphysics of Afterlife for Christian Thought (Routledge New Critical Thinking in Religion, Theology and Biblical Studies #37)

by James T. Turner, Jr.

Christian tradition has largely held three theological affirmations on the resurrection of the physical body. Firstly, that bodily resurrection is not a superfluous hope of afterlife. Secondly, there is immediate post-mortem existence in Paradise. Finally, there is numerical identity between pre-mortem and post-resurrection human beings. The same tradition also largely adheres to a robust doctrine of The Intermediate State, a paradisiacal disembodied state of existence following the biological death of a human being. This book argues that these positions are in fact internally inconsistent, and so a new theological model for life after death is required. The opening arguments of the book aim to show that The Intermediate State actually undermines the necessity of bodily resurrection. Additionally, substance dualism, a principle The Intermediate State requires, is shown to be equally untenable in this context. In response to this, the metaphysics of the afterlife in Christian theology is re-evaluated, and after investigating physicalist and constitutionist replacements for substance dualist metaphysics, a new theory called "Eschatological Presentism" is put forward. This model combines a broadly Thomistic hylemorphic metaphysics with a novel theory of Time. This is an innovative examination of the doctrine of life after death. It will, therefore, be of great interest to scholars of analytic theology and philosophy of religion.

On the Resurrection of the Dead: A New Metaphysics of Afterlife for Christian Thought (Routledge New Critical Thinking in Religion, Theology and Biblical Studies)

by James T. Turner, Jr.

Christian tradition has largely held three theological affirmations on the resurrection of the physical body. Firstly, that bodily resurrection is not a superfluous hope of afterlife. Secondly, there is immediate post-mortem existence in Paradise. Finally, there is numerical identity between pre-mortem and post-resurrection human beings. The same tradition also largely adheres to a robust doctrine of The Intermediate State, a paradisiacal disembodied state of existence following the biological death of a human being. This book argues that these positions are in fact internally inconsistent, and so a new theological model for life after death is required. The opening arguments of the book aim to show that The Intermediate State actually undermines the necessity of bodily resurrection. Additionally, substance dualism, a principle The Intermediate State requires, is shown to be equally untenable in this context. In response to this, the metaphysics of the afterlife in Christian theology is re-evaluated, and after investigating physicalist and constitutionist replacements for substance dualist metaphysics, a new theory called "Eschatological Presentism" is put forward. This model combines a broadly Thomistic hylemorphic metaphysics with a novel theory of Time. This is an innovative examination of the doctrine of life after death. It will, therefore, be of great interest to scholars of analytic theology and philosophy of religion.

Announcements of Plot in Genesis (The Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies)

by Laurence A. Turner

The four narrative blocks which comprise Genesis are prefaced by statements ('Announcements') which suggest ways in which the ensuing stories are likely to develop. The author concludes that the 'Announcements' influence their narratives in many different ways and that they are misleading indicators of how plots will develop. Genesis is more concerned to present the ironies of human motive and divine providence than to recount the working out of any pre-ordained plan on God's part. This original and refreshing monograph, written in a vigorous style, is certain to alter the way readers remember the Genesis stories.

Out of the Woods: A Memoir

by Luke Turner

After the disintegration of the most significant relationship of his life, the demons Luke Turner has been battling since childhood are quick to return - depression and guilt surrounding his identity as a bisexual man, experiences of sexual abuse, and the religious upbringing that was the cause of so much confusion. It is among the trees of London's Epping Forest where he seeks refuge. But once a place of comfort, it now seems full of unexpected, elusive threats that trigger twisted reactions.No stranger to compulsion, Luke finds himself drawn again and again to the woods, eager to uncover the strange secrets that may be buried there as he investigates an old family rumour of illicit behaviour. Away from a society that still struggles to cope with the complexities of masculinity and sexuality, Luke begins to accept the duality that has provoked so much unrest in his life - and reconcile the expectations of others with his own way of being.Out of the Woods is a dazzling, devastating and highly original memoir about the irresistible yet double-edged potency of the forest, and the possibility of learning to find peace in the grey areas of life.

Ecclesiastes: Qoheleth's Eternal Earth (Earth Bible Commentary)

by Marie Turner

Qoheleth is one of the most challenging and intriguing of the biblical authors. Above all, he is attentive to life's realities, neither optimistic about the world nor unappreciative of its goodness and pleasures. In this volume, Turner examines the writings of Qoheleth in the book of Ecclesiastes and provides an ecological reading of the text that gives readers clear insights into how biblical wisdom literature can be used to respond to the challenges facing the environment in the present day, as well as advancing the field of ecological hermeneutics. In this commentary Turner looks at the concept of Qoheleth's 'eternal earth', moving through the chapters of Ecclesiastes with an ear attuned to the voice of the Earth as it struggles to be heard above the voice of the economy. Such a voice is not necessarily antagonistic to that of Earth, but neither is it neutral. The ecological reader knows that a prudent economy is necessary for living, but if it is given precedence at the expense of Earth, there will be no future, let alone 'eternity', for Earth. Eco-justice demands that contemporary readers should be mindful of future generations and heed Qoheleth's counsel to value the fruits of one's labour without greed, allowing ecological hermeneutics to provide insights into contemporary environmental issues. Illustrating how a biblical framework for environmentally responsible living may be generated, Turner's analysis is vital both to those studying Qoheleth and to those invested in the Bible and ecology.

Our Great Big American God: A Short History of Our Ever-Growing Deity

by Matthew Paul Turner

Americans love God. We stamp God on our money, our bumper stickers, and our bodies. Yet culture critic Matthew Paul Turner says that God didn't just change America-America changed God. As a result, do we even recognize the "real" God? Whip-smart and provocative, Turner explores the United States' vast influence on God, told through an amazing true history of faith, politics, and evangelical pyrotechnics. From Puritans to Pentecostals, from progressives to mega-pastors, Turner examines how American history and ideals transformed our perception of God-for better and worse. Fearless and funny, this is the definitive guide to the American experience of the Almighty-a story so bizarre and incredible that it could only be made in the U.S.A. Regardless of political affiliation, it will make readers reconsider the way they think about America as a "Christian nation," and help them reimagine a better future for God and country.

Grammatical Insights into the New Testament (Bloomsbury Academic Collections: Biblical Studies)

by Nigel Turner

An extension of Turner's conclusions in Volume III of Moulton's Grammar of New Testament Greek. A positive contribution to the permanent meaning of controversial passages in the New Testament.

Turn, Turn, Turn: Popular Songs Inspired by the Bible

by Steve Turner

Did you know…? • 36% of Bob Dylan&’s songs published between 1961 and 1968 had biblical references, including his 1964 hit &“The Times They Are A-Changin.&’&” • The book of Ecclesiastes has been a great inspiration on popular music including the song &“Turn, Turn, Turn&” by The Birds, the Pink Floyd album The Dark Side of the Moon, and &“Desperado,&” the 1973 hit by The Eagles, among others. • Paul Simon once advised a young prospective lyricist to raid the Bible for memorable phrases. &“Just steal them,&” he said, &“That&’s what they&’re there for.&” There&’s no question that Scripture has influenced music since the first ever song was penned. In Turn! Turn! Turn! author and music connoisseur, Steve Turner, takes an in-depth look at the lyrics and cultural context of 100 of the greatest songs from the 1930s to today to reveal an often overlooked or ignored strand of influence in popular music—the Bible. Indeed, some of the &“greats&”—including Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen, Bono, Johnny Cash, Sting, and others—have repeatedly returned to the Bible for such sustenance, as well as musical inspiration and a framework with which they can better understand themselves. &“I hope the book prompts, provokes, and intrigues as it reveals this often-hidden history,&” writes Steve Turner. You&’ll never listen to your favorite song or popular tune the same way again after discovering how the Bible has influenced music.

Happiness Becomes You: A Guide To Changing Your Life For Good

by Tina Turner

‘Each of us is born, I believe, with a unique mission, a purpose in life that only we can fulfill. We are linked by a shared responsibility: to help our human family grow kinder and happier.’

Love, Love, Love: Spiritual Teachings

by Stephen Turoff

How can we become aware of pure unconditional love?With simple yet shattering words, Stephen Turoff seeks to awaken us to knowledge that already resides deep in our hearts: that God is love and love is God. Love is the power that created the universe and permeates all Creation. When we realize this, we are led to a recognition of our true nature as human beings.Stephen’s astonishing message – presented here as transcripts from a series of six seminars – can rouse us to reassess our lives and the way we think and act. We are perfect beings who have forgotten our divine nature. Our true self wants to awaken to the divine presence within. With guidance, we can teach ourselves to listen to the voice of our heart, in order really to know and experience truth.Stephen leads us to a deeper understanding of our connection with God and the purpose of our lives on earth. The knowledge he shares is based on profound life experience and a singular understanding of God and universal laws.‘Stephen Turoff is a psychic surgeon with a world-wide following and a history of “miraculous” healings as long as an NHS waiting list … even some mainstream doctors reluctantly acknowledge the evidence of his success.’ – More to Life magazine‘Stephen Turoff has been a spiritual healer for over 40 years. During that time he’s achieved near-legendary status in his field, attracting the attention of both international media and a string of distinguished clients. He’s also been the subject of numerous television programmes.’ – Psychic News

Access to History: The establishment of the Anglican Church 1529-70 (PDF)

by Roger Turvey

Give your students the best chance of success with this tried and tested series, combining in-depth analysis, engaging narrative and accessibility. Access to History is the most popular, trusted and wide-ranging series for A-level History students. This title: - Supports the content and assessment requirements of the 2015 A-level History specifications - Contains authoritative and engaging content

Access to History: The establishment of the Anglican Church 1529-70 (PDF)

by Roger Turvey

Give your students the best chance of success with this tried and tested series, combining in-depth analysis, engaging narrative and accessibility. Access to History is the most popular, trusted and wide-ranging series for A-level History students. This title: - Supports the content and assessment requirements of the 2015 A-level History specifications - Contains authoritative and engaging content

Children of God Storybook Bible

by Archbishop Desmond Tutu

A beautiful book of Bible stories, retold by the world’s best-loved cleric.

The Book of Forgiving: The Fourfold Path Of Healing For Ourselves And Our World

by Archbishop Desmond Tutu Rev Mpho Tutu

The Book of Forgiving, written together by the Nobel Peace Laureate Archbishop Desmond Tutu and his daughter Revd Mpho Tutu offers a deeply personal testament and guide to the process of forgiveness.

God Has A Dream: A Vision of Hope for Our Times (Thorndike Inspirational Ser.)

by Desmond Tutu

God Has A Dream is an extremely personal and liberating message of hope and light in dark times. In it, the Archbishop shows how important it is that, even as we face the harsh realities of our individual lives and global conditions, we remember the importance of hope and dreams - for it is on hope and dreams that a better future will be built, and that God's dream for us will be fulfilled. And Tutu also demonstrates how to bring these dreams to fruition in very practical terms, for example in learning how to love, ridding ourselves of our prejudices, opposing injustice, promoting the qualities of forgiveness, humility and generosity in ourselves, taking time to be still and quiet and in being patient. Meant not only for a Christian audience but also for those of all faiths - and none - who are drawn to a life of more inspiration and integrity, God Has A Dream is highly readable and very relevant to the times we live in. Instead of being a political document (as was his previous book No Future Without Forgiveness) this is a major work of contemporary spirituality from a Church leader known for his charisma, robust approach and humour.

In God's Hands: The Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book 2015

by Desmond Tutu

In God`s Hands is the 2015 Archbishop of Canterbury`s Lent Book. In this little gem of a book, Archbishop Desmond Tutu distils the wisdom forged through a childhood of poverty and apartheid, an adulthood lived in the glare of the world's media, and the long and agonising struggle for truth and reconciliation in South Africa, into the childlike simplicity which Jesus tells us characterises the Kingdom of God.Archbishop Tutu has produced a meditation on the infinite love of God and the infinite value of the human individual. Not only are we in God`s hands, he says, our names are engraved on the palms of God`s hands. Throughout an often turbulent life, Archbishop Tutu has fought for justice and against oppression and prejudice. As we learn in this book, what has driven him forward is an unshakeable belief that human beings are created in the image of God and are infinitely valuable. Each one of us is a God-carrier, a tabernacle, a sanctuary of the Divine Trinity. God loves us not because we are loveable but because he first loved us. And this turns our values upside down. In this sense the Gospel is the most radical thing imaginable.It is extremely moving that in this book Archbishop Tutu returns to something so simple and so profound after a life in which he has been involved in political, social and ethical issues that have seemed to be so very complex.

In God's Hands: The Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book 2015

by Desmond Tutu

In God`s Hands is the 2015 Archbishop of Canterbury`s Lent Book. In this little gem of a book, Archbishop Desmond Tutu distils the wisdom forged through a childhood of poverty and apartheid, an adulthood lived in the glare of the world's media, and the long and agonising struggle for truth and reconciliation in South Africa, into the childlike simplicity which Jesus tells us characterises the Kingdom of God.Archbishop Tutu has produced a meditation on the infinite love of God and the infinite value of the human individual. Not only are we in God`s hands, he says, our names are engraved on the palms of God`s hands. Throughout an often turbulent life, Archbishop Tutu has fought for justice and against oppression and prejudice. As we learn in this book, what has driven him forward is an unshakeable belief that human beings are created in the image of God and are infinitely valuable. Each one of us is a God-carrier, a tabernacle, a sanctuary of the Divine Trinity. God loves us not because we are loveable but because he first loved us. And this turns our values upside down. In this sense the Gospel is the most radical thing imaginable.It is extremely moving that in this book Archbishop Tutu returns to something so simple and so profound after a life in which he has been involved in political, social and ethical issues that have seemed to be so very complex.

In God's Hands: The Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book 2015

by Desmond Tutu

In God's Hands is the 2015 Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book. It is a meditation on the infinite love of God and the infinite value of the human individual. Not only are we in God's hands, says Desmond Tutu, our names are engraved on the palms of God's hands. Throughout an often turbulent life, Archbishop Tutu has fought for justice and against oppression and prejudice. As we learn in this book, what has driven him forward is an unshakeable belief that human beings are created in the image of God and are infinitely valuable. Each one of us is a God-carrier, a tabernacle, a sanctuary of the Divine Trinity. God loves us not because we are loveable but because he first loved us. And this turns our values upside down. In this sense, the Gospel is the most radical thing imaginable. It is extremely moving that in this book Archbishop Tutu returns to something so simple and so profound after a life in which he has been involved in political, social, and ethical issues that have seemed to be so very complex.

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