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The Winning Mind: What it takes to become a true champion

by Sebastian Coe

From his childhood amidst the steel mills of South Yorkshire to Olympic glory and beyond, Seb Coe's story is one of extraordinary achievement.One of the greatest middle-distance runners of all time, Seb earned four Olympic medals during a world-record breaking career. THE WINNING MIND is Seb's account of the challenges, hard graft, set-backs and victories that he experienced during his career, retold with the passion and commitment that ultimately made him such an inspirational sporting champion.As an athlete, politican, business speaker and key figure in the delivery of the 2012 Olympic Games, Seb Coe has striven to achieve success in every challenge he has faced. This is the story of one man's quest for excellence and the power of the winning mind.

The Winning Touch: My Autobiography (ebook)

by Graham McColl Stevie Chalmers

One of Celtic's greatest ever strikers, Stevie Chalmers epitomised the exciting attacking football with which Celtic took Europe by storm during the 1960s. It was Stevie who scored the golden goal in the 1967 European Cup final that clinched the great trophy for Celtic and that saw him and his team-mates immortalised as the Lisbon Lions. Stevie was the Glasgow club's leading scorer in that amazing 1966-67 season, when they became the first British club to reign as champions of Europe and in which they scooped up every trophy at home. He was also the club's most prolific striker during the 1960s, becoming leading goalscorer for Celtic four times during that decade. It was appropriate, then, that it should be Stevie Chalmers who should nip in ahead of everyone five minutes from time in Lisbon to finish off, with finesse, the challenge of Internazionale of Milan, the richest and most successful club in the world. It was the most magical moment in Celtic's history and Stevie describes here, in fascinating detail, just how he came to be in the right place at the right time to write himself into history. Here for the first time Stevie relates key inside details of Celtic's path to glory, his own enormous personal battle to overcome a near-fatal illness to become a footballer and his sometimes uneasy relationship with Jock Stein, the Celtic manager. It all underlines the momentousness of his being there to accomplish that match-winning feat on Celtic's greatest-ever day.

Winston Churchill: From the Boer War to the Second World War, the Life and Times of Britain's Greatest Leader (A\pocket Essentials Guide Ser.)

by Bill Price

During his long and extraordinary life, Winston Churchill was a central figure in almost all of the tumultuous events of the first half of the twentieth century. He was a soldier, writer and politician and, after the Second World War, he became one of the world's greatest statesmen. But his reputation rests on his role as a war leader and, in particular, on the period between May 1940 and July 1941, when Britain stood alone against Nazi Germany. Since his death in 1965, a few dissenting voices have cast him as, amongst other things, an opportunist and war-monger. But, as flawed as he undoubtedly was, most modern historians and politicians still hold him in the highest regard. In order to gain a better understanding of this remarkable man, this book looks at some of the key moments in Churchill's life, including his role in the British Army's last cavalry charge in the Battle of Omdurman and his escape from a prisoner of war camp during the Boer War. It then focuses on those momentous times when Churchill's courage and force of character almost single-handedly dragged Britain back from the brink of defeat in the Second World War and onwards towards an eventual Allied victory, making him, in the eyes of many people, one of the greatest of all Great Britons...

Winston Churchill Reporting: Adventures of a Young War Correspondent

by Simon Read

Long before his finest hour as Britain's wartime leader, Winston Churchill emerged on the world stage as a brazen foreign correspondent, covering wars of empire in Cuba, India, the Sudan, and South Africa. In those far-flung corners of the world, reporting from the front lines between 1895 and 1900, Churchill mastered his celebrated command of language and formed strong opinions about war. He thought little of his own personal safety, so convinced was he of his destiny, jumping at any chance to be where bullets flew and canons roared. "I have faith in my star that I am intended to do something in the world," he wrote to his mother at the age of twenty-three before heading into battle. Based on his private letters and war reportage, Winston Churchill Reporting intertwines young Winston's daring exploits in combat, adventures in distant corners of the globe, and rise as a major literary talent experiences that shaped the world leader he was to become.

Winston Churchill - the Wilderness Years: Speaking out Against Hitler in the Prelude to War

by Martin Gilbert

In 1928, Winston Churchill was at the height of his career. Chancellor of the Exchequer and a powerful and popular orator, leadership of the Conservative Party seemed within his grasp. A year later, all had changed. The Conservatives were defeated and, when a National Government was formed in 1931, Churchill was not asked to join it. Though he was a lone figure from this point, his acute political sense, foresight and courage were undiminished. Fed with secret inside information, Churchill consistently warned of the Nazi danger, even before the rise of Hitler. The British government, led by Stanley Baldwin and later Neville Chamberlain, fought him at every turn, even refusing him the right to broadcast. But he never gave up. It was as a direct result of his dogged perseverance that the British public came to realise the truth of his warnings - and a bond was formed that would be so vital in the years to come.

Winter: (Seasons Quartet 2) (Seasons Quartet #2)

by Karl Ove Knausgaard Lars Lerin Ingvild Burkey

The second volume in his autobiographical quartet based on the seasons, Winter is an achingly beautiful collection of daily meditations and letters addressed directly to Knaugsaard's unborn daughterIt is strange that you exist, but you don’t know anything about what the world looks like. It’s strange that there is a first time to see the sky, a first time to see the sun, a first time to feel the air against one’s skin. It’s strange that there is a first time to see a face, a tree, a lamp, pyjamas, a shoe. In my life that almost never happens anymore. But soon it will. In just a few months, I will see you for the first time. In Winter, we rejoin the great Karl Ove Knausgaard as the birth of his daughter draws near. In preparation for her arrival, he takes stock of the world, seeing it anew. While new life is on the horizon, the earth is also in hibernation, waiting for the warmer weather to return. In his inimitably sensitive style, he writes about everything from the moon, winter boots and messiness, to owls and birthdays. Taking nothing for granted, he fills these everyday familiar objects and ideas with new meaning. Startling, compassionate, and exquisitely beautiful, Knausgaard's writing is like nothing else. Somehow, he shows the world as it really is, at once mundane and sublime.

Winter 8000: Climbing the world's highest mountains in the coldest season (Legends And Lore Ser.)

by Bernadette McDonald

‘He appeared, without a word, in the tent’s entrance, covered in ice. He looked like anyone would after spending over twenty-four hours in a hurricane at over 8,000 metres. In winter. In the Karakoram. He was so exhausted he couldn’t speak.’Of all the games mountaineers play on the world’s high mountains, the hardest – and cruellest – is climbing the fourteen peaks over 8,000 metres in the bitter cold of winter. Ferocious winds that can pick you up and throw you down, freezing temperatures that burn your lungs and numb your bones, weeks of psychological torment in dark isolation: these are adventures for those with an iron will and a ruthless determination.For the first time, award-winning author Bernadette McDonald tells the story of how Poland’s ice warriors made winter their own, perfecting what they dubbed ‘the art of suffering’ as they fought their way to the summit of Everest in the winter of 1980 – the first 8,000-metre peak they climbed this way but by no means their last. She reveals what it was that inspired the Poles to take up this brutal game, how increasing numbers of climbers from other nations were inspired to enter the arena, and how competition intensified as each remaining peak finally submitted to leave just one awaiting a winter ascent, the meanest of them all: K2.Winter 8000 is the story of true adventure at its most demanding.

Winter Journal

by Paul Auster

'You think it will never happen to you, that it cannot happen to you, that you are the only person world to whom none of these things will ever happen, and then, one by one, they all begin to happen to you, in the same way they happen to everyone else.'In Winter Journal, Paul Auster moves through the events of his life in a series of memories grasped from the point of view of his life now: playing baseball as a teenager; participating in the anti-Vietnam demonstrations at Columbia University; seeking out prostitutes in Paris, almost killing his second wife and child in a car accident; falling in and out of live with his first wife; the 'scalding, epiphanic moment of clarity' in 1978 that set him on a new course as a writer.Winter Journal is a poignant memoir of ageing and memory, written with all the characteristic subtlety, imagination and insight that readers of Paul Auster have come to cherish.'An examination of the emotions of a man growing old . . . this book has much to recommend it, and Auster is unsparingly honest about himself.' Financial Times

A Winter on the Nile

by Anthony Sattin

In the winter of 1849, Florence Nightingale was an unknown 29-year-old - beautiful, well-born and deeply unhappy. After clashing with her parents over her refusal to marry, she had been offered a lifeline by family friends who suggested a trip to Egypt, a country which she had always longed to visit.By an extraordinary coincidence, taking the same boat from Alexandria was an unpublished French writer, Gustave Flaubert. Like Nightingale, he was at the crossroads in his life that was to lead to futureacclaim and literary triumph. Egypt for him represented escape and freedom as well as inspiration.But as a wealthy young man travelling with male friends, he had access to an altogether different Egpyt: where Nightingale sought out temples and dispensaries, Flaubert visited brothels and harems.In this beguiling book, Anthony Sattin takes a key moment in the lives of two extraordinary figures on the brink of international fame, and provides a fascinating insight into the early days of travel to one ofthe greatest tourist destinations on the planet.

Winter Sea: War, Journeys, Writers

by Alan Ross

'This is Alan Ross's fourth volume of autobiography (following on from Blindfold Games, Coastwise Lights, and After Pusan)... Winter Sea, like his previous volumes, is an intriguing mix of memoir, poetry, and travel writing.' PN Review'Fragmentary and delightfully idiosyncratic... [Winter Sea] has a distinctly maritime flavour, and the wartime memories recalled after 50 years mostly concern North Sea or Baltic cities... The smell of the Baltic, Ross writes, is 'a fusion of salt, sand dunes, pine trees and tar'... Wherever Ross travels, he has a book in his pocket, and more often than not his reading is by way of homage to a native poet or writer... The symphonic quality of this wistful and, at times, very moving collection is maintained with a final section of 15 new poems, mostly relating to the author's more recent travels. Winter Sea is a book to savour; Alan Ross brings history to life as only a poet can.' Euan Cameron, Independent

Winter Sunshine

by John Burroughs

Volume II in The Writings of John Burroughs.

Winter War: Hoover, Roosevelt, and the First Clash Over the New Deal

by Eric Rauchway

The history of the most acrimonious presidential handoff in American history--and of the origins of twentieth-century liberalism and conservatism When Franklin Roosevelt defeated Herbert Hoover in the 1932 election, they represented not only different political parties but vastly different approaches to the question of the day: How could the nation recover from the Great Depression? As historian Eric Rauchway shows in Winter War, FDR laid out coherent, far-ranging plans for the New Deal in the months prior to his inauguration. Meanwhile, still-President Hoover, worried about FDR's abilities and afraid of the president-elect's policies, became the first comprehensive critic of the New Deal. Thus, even before FDR took office, both the principles of the welfare state, and reaction against it, had already taken form. Winter War reveals how, in the months before the hundred days, FDR and Hoover battled over ideas and shaped the divisive politics of the twentieth century.

Wintering: How I learned to flourish when life became frozen

by Katherine May

'Wintering is every bit as beautiful and healing as the season itself ... This is truly a beautiful book' Elizabeth Gilbert'A peaceful rebuff to life in fast-forward' ObserverWintering is a season in the cold. It is a fallow period in life when you’re cut off from the world, feeling rejected, sidelined, blocked from progress, or cast into the role of an outsider. However it arrives, wintering is usually involuntary, lonely and deeply painful.In Wintering, Katherine May recounts her own year-long journey through winter, sparked by a sudden illness in her family that plunged her into a time of uncertainty and seclusion. When life felt at is most frozen, she managed to find strength and inspiration from the incredible wintering experiences of others as well as from the remarkable transformations that nature makes to survive the cold. This beautiful, perspective-shifting memoir teaches us to draw from the healing powers of the natural world and to embrace the winters of our own lives.

The Wintertons Unmuzzled: The Life & Times of Nick & Ann Winterton, Two Westminster Mavericks

by Sarah Winterton

With two MPs for parents, Sarah Winterton was one of the proudest women in the country. She felt as though her family was at the centre of events, and her parents, Nicholas and Ann Winterton - respective Members for Macclesfield and Congleton - were truly making a difference at the heart of British politics.But when the Wintertons became caught up in the parliamentary expenses scandal in 2009, Sarah was forced to question some of her longest-held assumptions about politics, family and the media. Was the life of a backbench MP worth the candle? Why slog away for hours on behalf of your constituents, if your only reward was to be vilified by Fleet Street?In this affectionate, defiant memoir, Sarah Winterton celebrates a pair of MPs renowned for their bloody-minded independence, who remain the longest-serving couple in the history of the House of Commons. She warmly and unashamedly defends not just her outspoken parents, but an entire political class in a time of great upheaval. With her rare perspective on 21st-century British politics, Sarah reveals a lost political world through insightful anecdotes, and asks challenging questions about the character of modern MPs and the functioning of Britain's parliamentary democracy.

The Wintry Sea

by Rupert Croft-Cooke

Part of Croft-Cooke's series of autobiographical works, The Sensual World.The Author says, 'I have given this book its title because the words seem to fit each of the two journeys it records, journeys which, in the cant phrase of the courtroom, ran concurrently.The first was through the Mediterranean on a Yugoslav cargo boat during the coldest month of one of Europe's most icy winters for a century. The second was along the coastlines of some recent fiction, my choice being made for me by the booksellers in various ports on whose stocks of Penguins I relied.'The books inThe Sensual Worldseries are a beautiful record of their time. England of the twenties, thirties, and forties is brilliantly evoked, and the descriptions of his travels in Europe and Argentina capture the wonder of youth and discovery. He met many famous writers of the time, and the descriptions of his meetings with Kipling, Masefield, Chesterton, and Compton Mackenzie, among others, are full of insight and also the freshness and enthusiasm of a novice writer at the feet of his heroes. He writes with skill, lightness of touch, and humour.

The Wisdom of Wolves: Understand How Wolves Can Teach Us To Be More Human

by Elli H. Radinger

'Enchanting' Mail on Sunday They care for their elderly, play with their kids, and always put family first. Can we all learn something from the wisdom of wolves? In this unforgettable book, wolf expert and naturalist Elli Radinger draws on her 25 years of first-hand experience among the wolves of Yellowstone National Park to tell us their remarkable stories.__________Wolves aren't wolfish. They can die of broken hearts, show tenderness to their young and elderly, and their packs are led by couples, with the key decisions made by females. They play, they pretend and they predate. They are more complex than we ever knew and more like us than we ever imagined. You'll meet Oh-Six, the she-wolf whose bold hunting technique astounded the most experienced biologists, Casanova who succeeded in luring his love away from her pack, and Druid alpha male 21, the magnanimous and compassionate leader.Ultimately, Radinger shows how much we can learn from these beautiful and mysterious creatures, and how much there is to gain from emulating the wisdom of wolves.'This book is the result of her two decades of close observation; part impassioned memoir, part natural history study, and part photo gallery. Her access to her subjects is extraordinary' Sunday Times

The Wise King: A Christian Prince, Muslim Spain, and the Birth of the Renaissance

by Simon R. Doubleday

An illuminating biography of Alfonso X, the 13th-century philosopher-king whose affinity for Islamic culture left an indelible mark on Western civilization"If I had been present at the Creation," the thirteenth-century Spanish philosopher-king Alfonso X is said to have stated, "Many faults in the universe would have been avoided." Known as El Sabio, "the Wise," Alfonso was renowned by friends and enemies alike for his sparkling intellect and extraordinary cultural achievements. In The Wise King, celebrated historian Simon R. Doubleday traces the story of the king's life and times, leading us deep into his emotional world and showing how his intense admiration for Spain's rich Islamic culture paved the way for the European Renaissance. In 1252, when Alfonso replaced his more militaristic father on the throne of Castile and León, the battle to reconquer Muslim territory on the Iberian Peninsula was raging fiercely. But even as he led his Christian soldiers onto the battlefield, Alfonso was seduced by the glories of Muslim Spain. His engagement with the Arabic-speaking culture of the South shaped his pursuit of astronomy, for which he was famed for centuries, and his profoundly humane vision of the world, which Dante, Petrarch, and later Italian humanists would inherit. A composer of lyric verses, and patron of works on board games, hunting, and the properties of stones, Alfonso is best known today for his Cantigas de Santa María (Songs of Holy Mary), which offer a remarkable window onto his world. His ongoing struggles as a king and as a man were distilled-in art, music, literature, and architecture-into something sublime that speaks to us powerfully across the centuries. An intimate biography of the Spanish ruler in whom two cultures converged, The Wise King introduces readers to a Renaissance man before his time, whose creative energy in the face of personal turmoil and existential threats to his kingdom would transform the course of Western history.

Wise Man Of The West (Harvill Press Editions Ser. #Vol. 7)

by Vincent Cronin

Matteo Ricci, an early recruit of the Jesuit order, was sent to China as a missionary in 1582. If he approached the Emperor with a Bible in one hand, in the other he carried much of the accumulated technological and philosophical wisdom of the late Renaissance Europe, and thus found favour among the Mandarins, the men of learning who enjoyed high status at the Imperial Court. He learned Chinese the better to discuss with them the problems in science and technology, as also questions of religion and the hereafter. But his progress was not unopposed, for the Wise Man from the West came to be seen as an unsettling element in a too-settled society. Ricci died in 1610, disappointed in his ambition to convert the Emperor, and with him the whole of China, to Christianity. But the seed was sown and the crop, even after almost a century of atheistic communism, continues to grow in present-day China.This story of the first fully documented contact between West and East offers a fascinating insight into the history of ideas during one of the most fertile eras in European and Chinese history. Vincent Cronin has built up a reputation with his scholarly, elegantly written works of history and biography, as one of the finest popular historians of his generation. This early book proves his gift as an acutely observant and sensitive historian.

Wish You Were Here!: The Lives, Loves And Friendships Of The Butlin's Girls (Individual Stories From Wish You Were Here! Ser. #4)

by Neil Hanson Lynn Russell

Touching true stories from the heyday of the Butlin’s holiday camps.

The Wit and Wisdom of G K Chesterton

by Bevis Hillier

G. K. Chesterton was a consummately witty man. In this new collection, Bevis Hillier draws on his most humorous epigrams and more serious extracts not only from his most popular works, the Father Brown stories, but also his contributions to the Illustrated London News and GK's Weekly, as well as his numerous novels, poems, essays and tracts on a vast array of subjects. These pieces shine a light into the margins of Chesterton's work and give a sense of the distinctive flavour of his mind. Hillier, the acclaimed biographer of John Betjeman, considers what it was that made Chesterton such a complex and fascinating character. Some of Chesterton's remarkable drawings (he trained as an artist at the Slade) are included, among them a hitherto unpublished caricature of Winston Churchill, c. 1919. This is a book for Chesterton fans everywhere.

The Wit and Wisdom of Sir Alex Ferguson

by Chris Riley

When Sir Alex Ferguson announced his retirement as manager of Manchester United in 2013 he called time on the most successful career in football history. During his twenty-seven years at the helm of the world's most famous club, he has shown himself to be a paragon of leadership, an incomparable man-manager and an unparalleled wielder of the notorious hairdryer. Commentating on the game, its characters and its components, Sir Alex is the complete football philosopher. From dealing with narcissistic footballers to demolishing the overinflated egos of opposition managers, this is The Wit and Wisdom of Sir Alex Ferguson.

The Wit and Wisdom of Winston Churchill

by Jon Allen

In this book you will find the best of that wit - ripe plums of humour taken from Churchill's parliamentary replies and ripostes, prepared addresses, asides and off-the-cuff remarks - all revealing a trenchant sharpness of mind, fine appreciation of humour and devastating sense of fun.

The Wit In The Dungeon: The Life of Leigh Hunt

by Anthony Holden

He was born in the year Dr Johnson died, and died in the year A.E. Houseman and Conan Doyle were born. The 75 years of Leigh Hunt's life uniquely span two distinct eras of English life and literature. A major player in the Romantic movement, the intimate and first publisher of Keats and Shelley, friend of Byron, Hazlitt and Lamb, Hunt lived on to become an elder statesman of Victorianism, the friend and chamption of Tennyson and Dickens, awarded a sate pension by Queen Victoria. Jailed in his twenties for insulting the Prince of Wales, Hunt ended his long, productive life vainly seeking the Poet Laureatship with fawning poems to Victoria. A tirelessly prolific poet, essayist, editor and critic, he has been described as having no rival in the history of English criticism. Yet Hunt's remarkable life story has never been fully told.Anthony Holden's deeply researched and vibrantly written biography gives full due to this minor poet - but major influence on his great Romantic contempories.

Witboy in Berlin: Adventures in the First World

by Deon Maas

When opportunity strikes, television producer Deon Maas joins the boatloads of migrants heading for Germany. Faced with the choice of taking all his possessions along or selling everything, he opts for the latter. With a duffel bag and his four dogs, he departs for the First World.Decadent Berlin blows his mind but also leaves him at a loss for words. As he criss-crosses the city, scratching at its pulsating underbelly, he marvels at German idiosyncrasies, and is roped into this new world by an array of vegan anarchists, eclectic musicians, football hooligans and graffiti artists.As he tries to settle in, he has to deal with everything from obnoxious bureaucrats to nosy neighbours. In the process, Maas debunks a few myths about the First World: it’s not a perfect place where everything works, and German efficiency is definitely overrated.By confronting the loss of his support network and adapting to a different political and social context, he learns exactly how deep his African roots go and what it takes to find your place in Europe as a white African.

Witboy in Berlyn: Avonture in die Eerste Wêreld

by Deon Maas

“Die honde en kinders verstaan Duits, maar ek nie.”Toe sy vrou werk kry in Duitsland, besluit Deon Maas in ’n oogwink om Berlyn toe te trek. In hierdie intellektueel stimulerende, dekadente stad voel hy hom op sekere maniere dadelik tuis – op ander nie.In die reis wat alle immigrante meemaak, ontdek hy meer oor homself en sy wortels terwyl hy sy voete in sy nuwe omgewing vind. Hy verwonder hom aan tipies Duitse gewoontes soos dat alle oorsese televisieprogramme (swak) oorgeklank word en dat die Duitsers hul sin vir ordelikheid op alles en almal afdwing.Op sy avonture ontmoet hy veganistiese anargiste, sokkerboewe, ’n lid van ’n satiriese Duitse politieke party en neem hy selfs aan ’n protesoptog deel.Maas ontdek dat alles nie perfek werk in die Eerste Wêreld nie. Mense daar sukkel om probleme op te los oor alles so streng gereguleer is en hulle weet nie eintlik hoe om die uit-dagings te hanteer wat toenemende immigrasie veroorsaak nie.Hy probeer ook antwoorde vind op vrae oor verlies, oor identiteit en hoe om as ’n wit immigrant uit Afrika in Europa in te pas. Maas besef al is hy op papier dalk iets van ’n Duitser danksy sy Duitse stamouers, is hy eintlik iemand heeltemal anders. Iemand wat in wese van Afrika is.

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