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Stumbling Over Truth: The Inside Story and the 'Sexed Up' Dossier, Hutton and the BBC

by Kevin Marsh

The 2004 report of the Hutton Inquiry created today's BBC. It cost the corporation its Chairman and Director General and seemed to many to usher in an age of self-doubt and caution. It was also the end of the most extraordinary experiment in news management Britain has ever seen - the decade of Alastair Campbell, Tony Blair's spin doctor, charged with delivering what Peter Mandelson described as New Labour's mission to 'create the truth'. But Lord Hutton condemned the BBC and its journalism without hearing a single word from the man who put the 'sexed up' dossier story on the air: Today editor Kevin Marsh. Had Hutton done so, his conclusions would surely have been very different. Now outside the BBC, Marsh can tell for the first time the inside story of Andrew Gilligan's notorious 6.07 broadcast on the Today programme. He explains how he was certain the story of the 'sexed up' dossier was true, but also how Gilligan's 'flawed reporting' fatally damaged the BBC's case. And he tells of his growing disillusionment with the British media's aptitude and appetite for holding power to account - or even telling the truth. Stumbling Over Truth is an important book for anyone who wants to understand the toe-to-toe confrontations between Tony Blair's government and the BBC, and the fight to resist unremitting government attempts to manipulate the media.

Mullahs Without Mercy: Human Rights and Nuclear Weapons

by Geoffrey Robertson

Iran is just years away from building an atomic bomb. Should it succeed, a weapon of monstrous destructive capability will be in the hands of mullahs who should be put on trial for international crimes: massacring political prisoners, assassinating dissidents at home and abroad, and torturing and killing protestors - as Geoffrey Robertson demonstrates in this groundbreaking study. In Mullahs Without Mercy, Robertson explores the chilling consequences of allowing Iran, North Korea and other countries to develop nuclear weapons. With unquestioned legal authority and learning, and in vivid style, Robertson proposes a radical solution: making the production of nuclear weapons an international crime. Indeed he argues that acquiring nukes is already contrary to an international law of human rights: the bomb is an illegal weapon of terror, and the politicians, prelates and scientists who build it are guilty of crimes against humanity. The development of this doctrine will have profound implications for Britain - and for the world.

Mossad: The Great Operations of Israel's Secret Service

by Michael Bar-Zoha

Mossad is universally recognised as the greatest intelligence service in the world. It is also the most enigmatic, shrouded in a thick veil of secrecy. Many of its enthralling feats are still unknown; most of its heroes remain unnamed. From the kidnapping of Eichmann in Argentina and the systematic tracking down of those responsible for the Munich massacre to lesser-known episodes of astonishing espionage, this extraordinary book describes the dramatic, largely secret history of Mossad and the Israeli intelligence community. Examining the covert operations, the targeted assassinations and the paramilitary activities within and outside Israel, Michael Bar-Zohar and Nissim Mishal detail the great stories of Mossad and reveal the personal tales of some of the best Mossad agents and leaders to serve their country.

Giants: The Dwarfs of Auschwitz

by Eilat Negev

During the 1930s and 40s the Lilliput Troupe, a beloved and successful family of singers and actors, dazzled with their vaudeville programme and unique performances. The only all-dwarf show of the time, their small stature earned them fame - and, ironically, ultimately saved their lives. As Hitler's war descended, the Ovitz family - seven of whom were dwarfs - was plunged into the horrors of the darkest moments in modern history. Descending from the cattle train into the death camp of Auschwitz, they were separated from other Jewish victims on the orders of one Dr Joseph Mengele, the 'Angel of Death'. Obsessed with eugenics, Dr Mengele carried out a series of loathsome experiments on the family and developed a disturbing fondness for his human lab-rats, so much so that when the Russian army liberated Auschwitz, all members of the family - the youngest, a baby boy just eighteen months old; the oldest, a 58-year-old woman - were still alive. Based on exhaustive research and interviews with Perla Ovitz, the troupe's last-surviving member, and scores of Auschwitz survivors, authors Yehuda Koren and Eilat Negev deftly describe the moving and inspirational story of this remarkable family and their indomitable will to survive.

Child of the Holocaust: A Jewish Child in Christian Disguise

by Jack Kuper

What would you do if, at nine years of age, you arrived home to find your family and friends had disappeared, rounded up by the Nazis? Jack Kuper lived this nightmare, and Child of the Holocaust is the suspenseful true story of his desperate attempts to survive persecution and extermination in Poland. Forced to abandon his Jewish upbringing and disguise his true identity to hide from the death squads, Jack grew up a stranger in his own skin. Initially finding refuge with a local family, Jack's youthful tenderness for daughter-of-the-house Genia belies the terrifying aggression and virulent destruction outside. Eventually turned out by a loving foster mother in fear for her family's life, Jack wandered the treacherous Polish soil. This is his unforgettable account of suffering and, ultimately, survival in the face of the most extreme privation and hatred. For this new edition of a lost classic, Jack Kuper has revisited the manuscript for the first time since he wrote it more than forty years ago, adding new material and including the real names of those who helped him.

Little Cyclone: The Girl who Started the Comet Line (Dialogue Espionage Classics Ser.)

by Airey Neave

On a hot afternoon in August 1941, a 24-year-old Belgian woman walks into the British consulate in Bilbao, neutral Spain, and demands to see the consul. She presents him with a British soldier she has smuggled all the way from Brussels, through occupied France and over the Pyrenees. It is a journey she will make countless times thereafter, at unthinkable danger to her own life. Her name is Andree de Jongh, though she will come to be known as the 'Little Cyclone' in deference to her extraordinary courage and tenacity. And she is an inspiration. From nursing wounded Allied servicemen, de Jongh will go on to establish the most famous escape line of the Second World War, one that will save the lives of more than 800 airmen and soldiers stranded behind enemy lines. The risks, however, will be enormous. The cost, unspeakably tragic. Her story is shot through atmospherically with the constant terror of discovery and interception - of late night knocks at the door, of disastrous moonlit river crossings, Gestapo infiltrators, firing squads and concentration camps. It is also a classic true story of fear overcome by giddying bravery. Originally published in the years after the war, Little Cyclone is a mesmerising tale of the best of humanity in the most unforgiving circumstances: a remarkable and inspiring account to rival the most dramatic of thrillers.

Brains & Bullets: How psychology wins wars

by Leo Murray

This book is the story of how Western armies forgot how to fight real people. It is not about generals and strategies; it is focused on small groups of men in desperate situations and how they use their brains and their bullets to make the enemy surrender.' The closer people get to war the less they like it. The human brain is hard-wired with a primal, almost imperceptible aversion to killing and an intense aversion to being killed. In order to win wars, vast effort and uncountable sums have been expended to try and quash these reactions in our soldiers. For years, this research focused on two questions: 'Who fights?' and 'How can we make more people fight?' In Brains & Bullets, military psychologist Leo Murray argues that, given the right conditions, everybody fights. Change those conditions, however, and almost everybody will stop fighting. If we really want to win wars, the question we ought to be asking is: 'How do we make the enemy stop fighting?' Interweaving intense first-hand accounts of combat with the hard science of tactical psychology, this extensively researched study offers a fascinating insight into what war does to the human mind. Most crucially, it also suggests a new way to approach military conflict - one which comes too late to change the outcome of the war in Afghanistan, but which may well have a profound effect on the future of modern warfare.

Edwardian Requiem: A Life of Sir Edward Grey

by Michael Waterhouse

Best remembered for his portentous remark at the outbreak of the Great War, 'The lamps are going out all over Europe. We shall not see them lit again in our lifetime', Sir Edward Grey was a consummate Edwardian politician and one of the most notable statesmen of an era abounding with them. In the first biography of Grey in forty years, Michael Waterhouse vividly depicts a man full of contradictions. Deep in his heart he was a country-loving fisherman, a sensitive naturalist and ornithologist who preferred reading Wordsworth to giving speeches in his constituency and answering questions on foreign policy in the House. Yet it fell to this peace-loving gentleman who rarely left his shores to ask his country to go to war with Germany. Grey spent nearly thirty years in Parliament and only reluctantly became Foreign Secretary of a country that presided over the greatest empire the world had seen since Roman times. Yet it was a position he filled for more than a decade, the longest anyone has ever served continuously in his or any age, firstly under Campbell-Bannerman and then Asquith. During this time he battled relentlessly to protect and advance the interests of his country against the volatile backdrop of a Europe in which the balance of power was tilting wildly. Edwardian Requiem is the remarkable portrait of a complex and enigmatic politician who presided over the twilight of old Europe.

Out in the Army: My Life as a Gay Soldier

by James Wharton

"A highly readable and distinctly 21st-century boy's own tale." BEN SUMMERSKILL OBESeeking escape from the quiet countryside of North Wales, the young James Wharton joined the British Army with adventure on his mind - and he found it...At basic training, boozing and brawling accompany the daily trials of army life, but all the while James faces a battle of his own: he is gay, and finding the courage to tell not only his family and friends but also his fellow soldiers will be the biggest challenge of all.Written with searing honesty, and updated to include a new chapter, James charts his incredible journey from punchbag to poster boy, describing the troubles and trials of coming to terms with his sexuality via late nights in Soho clubs and early mornings at ceremonial events.The first openly gay person to appear on the cover of Soldier, the British Army's official magazine, James has played an active role in developing support networks for gay men and women within the forces.A courageous and candid account from the soldier who escorted the Queen to the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, endured rocket attacks in the deserts of Iraq and served bravely alongside Prince Harry on the plains of Canada - this is James's life out in the army."A fascinating and charming insight into a remarkable life that wouldn't have been possible just a few years ago." MATT CAIN, FORMER CUL TURE EDITOR, CHANNEL 4 NEWS

The Emperor's Codes: Bletchley Park's role in breaking Japan's secret cyphers

by Michael Smith

The extraordinary wartime exploits of the British codebreakers based at Bletchley Park continue to fascinate and amaze. In The Emperor's Codes Michael Smith tells the story of how Japan's wartime codes were broken, and the consequences for the Second World War. He describes how the Japanese ciphers were broken and the effect on the lives of the codebreakers themselves. Using material from recently declassified British files, privileged access to Australian secret official histories and interviews with British, American and Australian codebreakers, this is the first full account of the critical role played by Bletchley Park and its main outposts around the world.

Operation Garbo: The Personal Story of the Most Successful Spy of World War II (Dialogue Espionage Classics Ser.)

by Juan Pujol García Nigel West Nigel West

He was GARBO to the Allies and ALARIC to the Germans – the most successful double agent of the Second World War. Indeed, his spy network across Britain was so highly regarded that he was decorated for his achievements … by both sides.Throughout the war, GARBO kept the Germans supplied with reports from his ring of twenty-four agents. Hitler’s spymasters never discovered or even suspected a double-cross, but all the agents in GARBO’s network existed solely in his imagination.In one of the most daring espionage coups of all time, GARBO persuaded the enemy to hold back troops that might otherwise have defeated the Normandy landings on D-Day; without him, the Second World War could have taken a completely different course.For decades, GARBO’s true identity was a closely guarded secret. After the war, he vanished. Years later, after faking his own death, Juan Pujol García was persuaded by the author to emerge from the shadowy world of espionage, and in this new edition of his classic account, now updated to include his agents’ original MI5 files, GARBO reveals his unique story.

Bradman's War: How the 1948 Invincibles Turned the Cricket Pitch into a Battle Field

by Malcolm Knox

Hailed as one of the greatest cricket teams of all time, the 1948 'Invincibles' are the only Australians to complete an Ashes tour undefeated. Their crushing victories under Sir Donald Bradman's captaincy created history, even if the Don himself, on his final tour, was left stranded for ever with a Test batting average of 99.94 after his duck in the fifth Test. Yet the mixed feelings about the manner in which these feats were achieved are often forgotten. In his fascinating account of the legendary tour, Malcolm Knox exposes the rift between those players with experience of the horrors of active duty, epitomised by the fiery but sporting RAAF pilot Keith Miller, and those without, such as the invalid Bradman. Knox reveals unease among the fans, commentators and players - from both teams - about Bradman's resolute tactics, both on the field and in the pavilion. Bradman's ruthlessness, even against war-ravaged veterans at the county clubs, dashed hopes that the legacy of Bodyline would finally be laid to rest and the postwar game resume in a more congenial spirit. While Bradman's War celebrates the talents of the likes of Ray Lindwall, Sid Barnes, Lindsay Hassett, Bill Johnston, Arthur Morris and, of course, their incomparable captain, it also questions our appreciation of sporting entertainment when rivalries escalate - and competition verges on hostility. If the spoils are to the victor, what is there for lovers of the game?

On the Run: Deserters Through the Ages

by Graeme Kent

There have been many books written about valour in battle. This is not one of them. On the contrary, On the Run deals entirely with those men and women who have departed from life in the armed forces. For as long as there have been wars there have been those who have fled from the cannon's roar. In this fascinating and unique history of deserters and desertion, Graeme Kent scours the annals of warfare to find those who, for a multitude of often complex reasons, have gone absent without leave. Among their number are poets and pugilists, thieves and thugs, lovers and lunatics, princes and politicians, comedians and conspirators, film stars and fanatics, and even a pope, all brought together by the simple fact that at one time or another they went on the run. Covering thousands of years and spanning the globe, this compelling book presents an extraordinary anecdotal history of perhaps the most controversial and emotive subject in war.

Klop: Britain's Most Ingenious Secret Agent

by Peter Day

Klop Ustinov was Britain's most ingenious secret agent, but he wasn't authorised to kill. Instead, he was authorised to tell tall tales, bemusing and beguiling his enemies into revealing their deepest, darkest secrets. From the Russian Revolution to the Cold War, he bluffed and tricked his way into the confidence of everyone from Soviet commissars to Gestapo Gruppenführer. In Klop: Britain's Most Ingenious Secret Agent, journalist Peter Day brings to life a man descended from Russian aristocrats and Ethiopian princesses but who fancied himself the perfect Englishman. His codename was U35 but his better-known nickname 'Klop' meant 'bedbug', a name given to him by a very understanding wife on account of his extraordinary capacity to hop from one woman's bed to another in the service of the King. Frequenting the social gatherings of Europe in the guise of innocent bon viveur, he displayed a showman's talent for entertaining (a trait his son, the actor Peter Ustinov, undoubtedly inherited), holding a captive audience and all the while scavenging secrets from his unsuspecting companions. Klop was masterful at gathering truth by telling a story; this is his.

The 10 Football Matches That Changed the World: And The One That Didn't

by Jim Murphy

The assertion that 'football isn't a matter of life or death, it's much more important than that' has been verified repeatedly throughout modern history. It has bolstered tyrants and helped depose them; contributed to conflict and created ceasefires. It has been an incubator of racism at home and helped bring down a racist regime abroad; shaped cities, changed cultures and inspired resistance. Its impact is as dynamic as the game itself. In this fascinating exploration, Jim Murphy takes us on a journey around the world and through the years, from Franco's Spain to Africa's Alcatraz, Robben Island. Charting the match that sparked a Central American war, the Barcelona team threatened at gunpoint, and the game that helped save Rupert Murdoch's media empire, among much else, Murphy lends a fresh new perspective to some of the most iconic moments in international football. Blending a love of the game with an appreciation of its place in global events, this is an authoritative and often humorous mix of sport and history, featuring fascinating first-hand insights from those most involved in the ten matches that changed the world ... and the one that didn't.

Xavier: A British Secret Agent with the French Resistance

by Richard Heslop

Colnel Richard Heslop, alias Xavier, was one of Britain's Greatest Special Operations agents in France. Ingeniously orchestrating resistance groups and ruthlessly sabotaging German operations, Xavier played a crucial role in Allied espionage during the war, from late 1942 right through to D-Day. Sent to France in the middle of the conflict, he delicately balanced clandestine missions and dangerous wartime operations on a daily basis, yet his name barely gets a mention in the accounts of the Special Operations Executive (SOE), making this insight all the more fascinating. It is clear that Xavier's role was like no other. it was a job that involved frequent encounters with the terrifying possibilities of capture, torture and death; it was a job where a careless whisper could deliver a man into the hands of the Gestapo; and it was a job that involved acts of sabotage, espionage, theft, and sometimes even murder... Xavier is a dramatic and compelling account of courage and endurance in the face of a merciless enemy - the true story of one of Britain's greatest secret agents.

An Inconvenient Genocide: Who Now Remembers the Armenians?

by Geoffrey Robertson

The most controversial question that is still being asked about the First World War - was there an Armenian genocide? - will come to a head on 24 April 2015, when Armenians worldwide will commemorate its centenary and Turkey will deny that it took place, claiming that the deaths of over half of the Armenian race were justified. This has become a vital international issue. Twenty national parliaments in democratic countries have voted to recognise the genocide, but Britain and the USA continue to equivocate for fear of alienating their NATO ally. Geoffrey Robertson QC condemns this hypocrisy, and in An Inconvenient Genocide he proves beyond reasonable doubt that the horrific events in the Ottoman Empire in 1915 constitute the crime against humanity that is today known as genocide. He explains how democracies can deal with genocide denial without infringing free speech, and makes a major contribution to understanding and preventing this worst of all crimes. His renowned powers of advocacy are on full display as he condemns all those - from Sri Lanka to the Sudan, from Old Anatolia to modern Syria and Iraq - who try to justify the mass murder of children and civilians in the name of military necessity or religious fervour.

Odd People: Hunting Spies in the First World War (Dialogue Espionage Classics Ser.)

by Basil Thomson

First World War espionage was a fascinating and dangerous affair, spawning widespread paranoia in its clandestine wake. The hysteria of the age, stoked by those within the British establishment who sought to manipulate popular panic, meant there was no shortage of suspects. Exaggerated claims were rife: some 80,000 Germans were supposedly hidden all over Britain, just waiting for an impending (and imagined) invasion. No one could be trusted... Against this backdrop, as head of Scotland Yard's Criminal Investigation Department, it was Basil Thomson's responsibility to hunt, arrest and interrogate the potential German spies identified by the nascent British intelligence services. Thomson's story is an extraordinary compendium of sleuthing and secrets from a real-life Sherlock Holmes, following the trails of the many specimens he tracked, including the famous dancer, courtesan and spy, Mata Hari. Yet his activities gained him enemies, as did his criticism of British intelligence, his ambition to control MI5 and his efforts to root out left-wing revolutionaries - which would ultimately prove to be the undoing of his career. Odd People is the insightful and wittily observed account of Thomson's incomparably exciting job, offering us a rare glimpse into the dizzying world of spies and the mind of the detective charged with foiling their elaborate plots. The Dialogue Espionage Classics series began in 2010 with the purpose of bringing back classic out-of-print spy stories that should never be forgotten. From the Great War to the Cold War, from the French Resistance to the Cambridge Five, from Special Operations to Bletchley Park, this fascinating spy history series includes some of the best military, espionage and adventure stories ever told.

Forever England: The Life of Rupert Brooke

by Mike Read

Rupert Brooke, strikingly good-looking, effortlessly charming and prodigiously gifted, has become the tragic embodiment of the generation lost between 1914 and 1918. Upon the poet's tragic untimely death, Winston Churchill declared that 'we shall never see his like again', yet Brooke immortalised himself in his own poignant verse: 'If I should die, think only this of me: That there's some corner of a foreign field that is forever England'. Brooke died serving king and country on the anniversary of Shakespeare's birth, St George's Day 1915, en route to fight at Gallipoli. As the tributes poured in and the war gathered momentum, the press heralded him as a hero - a focal point for the nation's grief. Already an acclaimed poet and dramatist in his youth, his romantic war poetry contrasts starkly with the work of some of his more disillusioned contemporaries. But the private letters of 'the handsomest man in all of England' reveal a far more troubled, and often misunderstood, individual... In this updated edition of Forever England, Mike Read, founder of the Rupert Brooke Society, explores the poet's fascinating life and legacy. From a tangled web of secret affairs, literary circles, mental illness and a previously unknown lovechild emerges the intriguing personality and enduring poetry of Rupert Brooke - the voice of a country torn apart by war.

Double Cross in Cairo: The True Story of the Spy Who Turned the Tide of War in the Middle East

by Nigel West

As part of the infamous Double Cross operation, Jewish double agent Renato Levi proved to be one of the Allies' most devastating weapons in World War Two. ln 1941, with the help of Ml6, Levi built an extensive spy-ring in North Africa and the Middle East. But, most remarkably, it was entirely fictitious. This network of imagined informants peddled dangerously false misinformation to Levi's unwitting German handlers. His efforts would distort any enemy estimates of Allied battle plans for the remainder of the war. His communications were infused with just enough truth to be palatable, and just enough imagination to make them irresistible. ln a vacuum of seemingly trustworthy sources, Levi's enemies not only believed in the CHEESE network, as it was codenamed, but they came to depend upon it. And, by the war's conclusion, he could boast of having helped the Allies thwart Rommel in North Africa, as well as diverting whole armies from the D-Day landing sites. He wielded great influence and, as a double agent, he was unrivalled. Until now, Levi's devilish deceptions and feats of derring-do have remained completely hidden. Using recently declassified fi les, Double Cross in Cairo uncovers the heroic exploits of one of the Second World War's most closely guarded secrets.

The Welfare of Nations

by James Bartholomew

Why is unemployment so low in Switzerland but so high in Spain? Why is social housing more successful in Singapore than in France? Why do welfare states across the world function so differently to Britain's? The twentieth century experienced an epochal war between capitalism and communism, but the real winner of the conflict, James Bartholomew argues, was welfare statism. The defining form of government of our age, welfare states have spread across the advanced world and are changing the very nature of modern civilisation. In his bestselling book The Welfare State We're In, Bartholomew controversially argued that the British welfare state has done more harm than good. Many people - including Lady Thatcher - responded by saying, 'If that is the case, what should we do about it?' Now, in this hard-hitting and provocative new contribution, Bartholomew sets out to answer that question. Travelling across the globe, from Australia in the east to San Francisco in the west, he investigates what happens elsewhere in the world and considers which welfare models Britain could potentially follow. His search for the best education, healthcare and support services takes him to eleven vastly different countries as he teases out the advantages and weaknesses of other nations' welfare states and delves into crucial issues such as literacy, poverty and inequality. What damage is being done by failing welfare states? What lessons can be learned from the best welfare states? And is it too late to stop welfare states permanently diminishing the lives and liberties of people around the world?

Strange Intelligence: Memoirs of Naval Secret Service (Classics Of Espionage Ser.)

by Hector C. Bywater

Hector C. Bywater was perhaps the British secret service's finest agent operating in Germany before the First World War, tasked with collecting intelligence on naval installations. Recruited by Mansfield Cumming, the first 'C' (or head of what would become MI6), Bywater was given the designation 'H2O' in what was a rather obvious play on his name - and the equivalent of James Bond's '007'. Indeed, the charming, courageous Bywater probably came as close to the popular image of Ian Fleming's most famous character as any British secret agent ever did. Originally written up in 1930 as a series of thrilling articles in the Daily Telegraph, his experiences were soon turned into a book, with the help of Daily Express journalist H. C. Ferraby, collating Bywater's espionage endeavours in one rollicking tale of secret service adventure. Although the identities of the British spies carrying out the missions in Strange Intelligence are disguised, we now know that most of them were in fact Bywater himself. Ahead of a war that was to put the British Navy to its sternest test since Trafalgar, Bywater reveals how he and his fellow agents deceived the enemy to gather vital intelligence on German naval capabilities. His account is a true classic of espionage and derring-do.

The Bedbug: Klop Ustinov: Britain's Most Ingenious Spy (Dialogue Espionage Classics Ser.)

by Peter Day

Klop Ustinov was Britain's most ingenious spy - but he was never licensed to kill. Instead, he was authorised to bemuse and beguile his enemies into revealing their deepest, darkest secrets. From the Russian Revolution to the Cold War, he bluffed and tricked his way into the confidence of everyone from Soviet commissars to Gestapo Gruppenführer. Although his official codename was U35, he was better known as 'Klop', meaning 'Bedbug' - a name given to him by a very understanding wife on account of his extraordinary capacity to hop from one woman's bed to another in the King's service. Frequenting the social gatherings of Europe under the guise of innocent bon viveur, he displayed a showman's talent for entertaining (a trait his son, the actor Peter Ustinov, undoubtedly inherited) and captivated unsuspecting audiences while scavenging their secrets. Using exciting anecdotes and first-hand accounts, Peter Day explores the fascinating life of one of espionage's most inventive and memorable characters. The Bedbug was a master of uncovering the truth through telling tales; now his own tale can be told.

The Spy Net: The Greatest Intelligence Operations of the First World War (Dialogue Espionage Classics Ser.)

by Henry Landau

The 'White Lady' spy net stretched across Europe, encompassing more than 1,000 agents and producing 70 per cent of Allied intelligence on the German forces in the First World War. Through sheer ingenuity, it maintained a staggeringly complex network of spies deep behind enemy lines, who provided vital information on troop movements to and from the Western Front. Its success rested on one man: Henry Landau. Talent-spotted while on a dinner date with one of the secret service's secretaries, Landau left with an exclusive invitation to the service headquarters to meet the legendary 'C' (Mansfield Cumming, the 'chief' of what is now MI6). Fully aware that the man on the other side of the door had a reputation for intimidating his young recruits - such as stabbing his leg without letting on that it was wooden - Landau never expected to be given the daunting task of running La Dame Blanche, nor did he realise how instrumental he would be in helping the Allies turn the tide of the war. Vivid, fast-paced and utterly compelling, The Spy Net is the extraordinary story of the war's most successful intelligence operation, as told by the man who pulled the strings.

Understanding the Nazi Genocide: Marxism After Auschwitz (IIRE (International Institute for Research and Education))

by Enzo Traverso

'...this is a genuinely original contribution to our understanding. Students of the Holocaust sometimes worry that too much analysis may immunise us against its unbelievable horror. Traverso avoids that risk with great sensitivity and imagination.' Socialist Review In Understanding the Nazi Genocide Enzo Traverso sustains a dialogue with writings on the Shoah from Hannah Arendt to Daniel Goldhagen by drawing on the critical and heretical Marxism of Walter Benjamin and the Frankfurt School, which grasped late capitalism’s pent-up capacity for destructive upheavals exacerbated by bureaucratic organisation and advanced technology.After Auschwitz, Hiroshima and the gulag, the old warning slogan - socialism or barbarism - formulated by European Marxists at the beginning of twentieth century needs to be seriously ‘revised’. The choice we face today is no longer between the progress of civilisation and a fall into ancient savagery, but between socialism conceived as a new civilisation and the destruction of humankind. For Traverso the Warsaw Ghetto uprising is an image of what should impel us to rebel: not a sense of inevitable victory, but an ethical imperative.

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