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Zwischen Taktstock und Hörsaal: Das Amt des Universitätsmusikdirektos in Tübingen 1817-1952

by Gabriela Rothmund-Gaul

Im traditionellen Fächerkanon der Tübinger Alma Mater war er nicht vorgesehen: der Universitätsmusikdirektor. Doch schon der erste akademische Musiklehrer Friedrich Silcher gestaltete in über 40 Dienstjahren seine Stelle zu einem mit Ansehen und vielfältigsten Pflichten versehenen Amt, das von der Hochschule und aus der Stadt nicht mehr wegzudenken war. Schon bei ihm wurde die der Stelle immanente Polarität deutlich - die Tätigkeit als Praktiker und als Theoretiker -, die erst 1952 zur Trennung von Praxis und Wissenschaft und zur Errichtung eines Lehrstuhls für Musikwissenschaft führte. Auf der Basis ausgiebiger Quellenstudien stellt Rothmund-Gaul unter dem institutionsgeschichtlichen Ansatz das Werden des Faches Musikwissenschaft - exemplifiziert an der Universität Tübingen - dar. Daß unter den Bewerbern viele berühmte Musikwissenschaftler wie Musiker waren, zeigt einerseits, welche Anziehungskraft das Amt eines Universitätsmusikdirektors hatte, und macht andererseits deutlich, wie sehr musikalische Praxis und musikwissenschaftliches Arbeiten noch bis in die Mitte unseres Jahrhunderts verbunden waren.

Zwischen Romantik und Restauration: Musik im Realismus-Diskurs 1848 bis 1871

by Martin Geck

Realismus in der Musik? Indem Martin Geck bedeutende Werke von Schumann, Wagner, Berlioz, Liszt, Mahler und Brahms der Epoche des Realismus zuweist, zeichnet er einen spannenden politisch-ästhetischen Diskurs nach. Dabei positioniert er die Meisterwerke der Musik zwischen den Vorwürfen der Selbstverliebtheit einerseits und der Politiksüchtigkeit andererseits. Somit entsteht ein völlig neues Bild der Musikgeschichte des 19. Jahrhunderts.

Zwischen bürgerlicher Identität und musikalischer Profession: Die Geschichte der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft Bremen im 19. Jahrhundert (Musik und Klangkultur #53)

by Katrin Bock

1825 geschieht in Bremen etwas Erstaunliches: In der Hansestadt schließt sich ein kleiner Kreis des Stadtbürgertums zusammen, um ein professionelles Orchester zu gründen. Es entsteht der Verein für Privat-Concerte - u. a. Vorgänger der heutigen Bremer Philharmoniker. Unter welchen sozialen und städtischen Voraussetzungen fand die Vereinsgründung statt? Wer war beteiligt und welche musikalischen Institutionen standen in Wechselwirkung zum Privat-Concert? Katrin Bock stellt die Konzertdirektoren und Dirigenten vor und fragt nach dem »hanseatischen Geschmack«.

Ziggyology: A Brief History Of Ziggy Stardust

by Simon Goddard

He came from Outer Space...It was the greatest invention in the history of pop music – the rock god who came from the stars – which struck a young David Bowie like a lightning bolt from the heavens. When Ziggy the glam alien messiah fell to Earth, he transformed Bowie from a prodigy to a superstar who changed the face of music forever. But who was Ziggy Stardust? And where did he really come from?In a work of supreme pop archaeology, Simon Goddard unearths every influence that brought Ziggy to life – from HG Wells to Holst, Kabuki to Kubrick, and Elvis to Iggy. Ziggyology documents the epic drama of the Starman’s short but eventful time on Planet Earth… and why Bowie eventually had to kill him.

Zayn: The Official Autobiography

by Zayn

***NOMINATED FOR THE NME BEST BOOK AWARD 2017 *** The first and only OFFICIAL book from ZAYN, for his ultimate fans. Zayn's autobiography features exclusive, never-before-seen photographs alongside his story. -------------------------------- 'This book is my diary of a period that I would like to share with you all. I hope that there are things in the book that contextualise some of the moments and memories we have all shared together. There are things I address in the book that are very personal to me, things that I have never told anyone, things I still find hard to talk about. It's a part of a journey I'm still on' - ZAYN ZAYN opens up with this collection of thoughts, inspiration, and never-before-seen personal photographs. After five years of massive success with One Direction, ZAYN launched his career as a solo artist with Mind of Mine, becoming one of the most successful artists in the world. Now, for the first time ever, ZAYN is going to tell and show all in this intimate and raw scrapbook of his life. Never-before-released photos give readers insight to ZAYN, no-holds-barred. Gorgeously designed with hundreds of full-color photographs and Zayn's notes, drawings, song lyrics, and personal stories, the book captures Zayn's most private moments and his candid feelings on fame, success, music, and life. The next chapter of ZAYN'S evolution into global superstar, told by the artist who is living it. Global superstar ZAYN shares a photographic journey of his life since leaving One Direction. *** Reviews for Mind of Mine: "A singer eager to reclaim the parts of himself that five years in the pop klieg lights forced into the shadows." -The New York Times "Sonically, you won't find many pop albums in 2016 more immaculately conceived than this." -SPIN "Sublime." -USA Today "Malik can sing . . . he's done this before, but not like this." -Rolling Stone "A moody, deeply textured R&B album..." -Los Angeles Times "Zayn has clearly achieved his aim of making an album of sexy, credible pop-R&B." -NME

Yves Montand in the USSR: Cultural Diplomacy and Mixed Messages

by Bruce Johnson Hannu Salmi Mila Oiva

This volume is the first book-length account of Yves Montand’s controversial tour of the Soviet Union at the turn of the years 1956/57. It traces the mixed messages of this internationally visible act of cultural diplomacy in the middle of the turbulent Cold War. It also provides an account of the celebrated French singer-actor’s controversial career, his dedication to music and to peace activism, as well as his widespread fandom in the USSR. The book describes the political background for the events of the year 1956, including the changing Soviet atmosphere after Stalin’s death, portrays the rising transnational stardom of Montand in the 1940s and 1950s, and explores the controversies aroused by his plan to visit Moscow after the Hungarian Uprising. The book pays particular attention to Montand’s reception in the USSR and his concert performances, drawing on unique archival material and oral history interviews, and analyses the documentary Yves Montand Sings (1957) released immediately after his visit.

Yuming's The 14th Moon (33 1/3 Japan)

by Lasse Lehtonen

It is not an exaggeration that Matsutoya Yumi-better known by her stage name Yuming-is one of the most influential figures in Japanese popular music history. A singer-songwriter recognized globally for her songs used in Miyazaki Hayao's beloved animations, Yuming has captured the hearts of listeners of different generations since her debut in the early 1970s. Her fourth album, The 14th Moon, released in 1976, was a milestone in establishing her signature style: the posh, “city” sound that later paved the way to the 1980s City Pop and 1990s J-pop. In addition to examining the album's astonishing stylistic versatility, this book explores how Yuming revolutionized the position of women in Japanese popular music and how her work can help us understand social changes in Japan of the 1970s.

Yuming's The 14th Moon (33 1/3 Japan)

by Lasse Lehtonen

It is not an exaggeration that Matsutoya Yumi-better known by her stage name Yuming-is one of the most influential figures in Japanese popular music history. A singer-songwriter recognized globally for her songs used in Miyazaki Hayao's beloved animations, Yuming has captured the hearts of listeners of different generations since her debut in the early 1970s. Her fourth album, The 14th Moon, released in 1976, was a milestone in establishing her signature style: the posh, “city” sound that later paved the way to the 1980s City Pop and 1990s J-pop. In addition to examining the album's astonishing stylistic versatility, this book explores how Yuming revolutionized the position of women in Japanese popular music and how her work can help us understand social changes in Japan of the 1970s.

You've Got This: And Other Things I Wish I Had Known

by Louise Redknapp

In more than two decades in the limelight, Louise Redknapp has weathered her fair share of ups and downs, but through it all she's remained unapologetically true to herself.From dancing in her bedroom as a young girl with big dreams to getting a scholarship to Italia Conti and experiencing her first taste of musical success with Eternal, to navigating fertility struggles, motherhood and rediscovering her passion for performing, in You've Got This Louise offers a refreshingly honest perspective on the experiences that have shaped her.Warm, funny and wise - like a chat with a close friend - this empowering and uplifting guide weaves together Louise's personal stories and poignant observations on life to gently reassure and encourage, while providing tips and advice on how to get the most out of life by embracing positivity.Brimming with insight on falling back in love with yourself, managing expectations, overcoming critics, dealing with social media and trusting your instincts as a parent, this is Louise's powerful love letter to anyone who has ever wondered if they're getting it right: you've got this.

Youth, Music and Creative Cultures: Playing for Life

by Geraldine Bloustien Margaret Peters

This book offers an evocative cross-cultural exploration into the everyday lives and music practices of young people from their own broad social, cultural and ethnic perspectives. Youth from seven urban locales in Australia, the UK, the US and Europe document and reflect on their own learning processes and music activities.

Youth Identities and Argentine Popular Music: Beyond Tango

by Pablo Semán and Pablo Vila

This book analyzes the music that young porteñas/os (the inhabitants of Buenos Aires, Argentina) actually listen to nowadays, which, contrary to well-entrenched stereotypes, is not tango but rock nacional, cumbiaand romantic music. Chapters examine the music and what the Argentinean youth use it to say about themselves.

Youth And Rock In The Soviet Bloc (PDF): Youth Cultures, Music, And The State In Russia And Eastern Europe

by Christopher Ward Dean Vuletic Sergei Zhuk Zhuk Risch Polly McMichael Gleb Tsipursky Tom Junes Jonathyne Briggs Kate Gerrard Sandor Horvath Gregory Kveberg William Risch David Tompkins

Youth and Rock in the Soviet Bloc explores the rise of youth as consumers of popular culture and the globalization of popular music in Russia and Eastern Europe. This collection of essays challenges assumptions that Communist leaders and Western-influenced youth cultures were inimically hostile to one another. While initially banning Western cultural trends like jazz and rock-and-roll, Communist leaders accommodated elements of rock and pop music to develop their own socialist popular music. They promoted organized forms of leisure to turn young people away from excesses of style perceived to be Western. Popular song and officially sponsored rock and pop bands formed a socialist beat that young people listened and danced to. Young people attracted to the music and subcultures of the capitalist West still shared the values and behaviors of their peers in Communist youth organizations. Despite problems providing youth with consumer goods, leaders of Soviet bloc states fostered a socialist alternative to the modernity the capitalist West promised. Underground rock musicians thus shared assumptions about culture that Communist leaders had instilled. Still, competing with influences from the capitalist West had its limits. State-sponsored rock festivals and rock bands encouraged a spirit of rebellion among young people. Official perceptions of what constituted culture limited options for accommodating rock and pop music and Western youth cultures. Youth countercultures that originated in the capitalist West, like hippies and punks, challenged the legitimacy of Communist youth organizations and their sponsors. Government media and police organs wound up creating oppositional identities among youth gangs. Failing to provide enough Western cultural goods to provincial cities helped fuel resentment over the Soviet Union's capital, Moscow, and encourage support for breakaway nationalist movements that led to the Soviet Union's collapse in 1991. Despite the Cold War, in both the Soviet bloc and in the capitalist West, political elites responded to perceived threats posed by youth cultures and music in similar manners. Young people participated in a global youth culture while expressing their own local views of the world.

Young Soul Rebels: A Personal History of Northern Soul

by Stuart Cosgrove

Northern soul is the ultimate underground music scene. Hidden away from the mainstream, it has defied the logic of fashion and outlasted more visible youth culture movements such as punk and rave. Author Stuart Cosgrove is an insider who has been a well-known collector on the scene for decades. Here he takes the reader on a rollercoaster journey to the stubborn heart of soul music's secret society and the legendary clubs that became the cathedrals of rare soul: the Twisted Wheel in Manchester, the Golden Torch in Stoke, Wigan Casino, the Top of the World in Stafford, and the evergreen 100 Club. As in the author's cult book Detroit 67, Young Soul Rebels tells a wider social history, looking at the all-nighters and the flamboyant characters who shaped the scene, the obsessive collecting of rare vinyl, the amphetamine abuse, police raids on soul clubs, the north–south divide, the Yorkshire Ripper murders, the miners' strike, the collapse of the industrial north, bootlegging and the rise of new technologies, which against all expectations have breathed new life into the scene. This is a candid and witty story of the cult they couldn't tame.

Young Marble Giants' Colossal Youth (33 1/3)

by Michael Blair Joe Bucciero

Welsh post-punk band Young Marble Giants released one LP in 1980 and then, like their vanishing portraits on the album's cover, disappeared. Even though Colossal Youth received positive reviews and sold surprisingly well, Young Marble Giants quickly slid into the margins of rock 'n' roll history-relegated to cult status among post-punk and indie rock fans. Their lasting appeal owes itself to the band's singular approach and response to punk rock. Instead of employing overt political ideology and abrasive sounds to rebel against the status quo, Young Marble Giants filled their songs with restraint, ambiguity, and silence. The trio opened up their music to new sounds and ideas that redefined punk's rules of rebellion.Where did their rebellious ideas and impulses come from? By tracing Colossal Youth's artistic origins from Ancient Greece to the 20th-century avant-garde, Michael Blair and Joe Bucciero uncover the intricacies of Young Marble Giants' idiosyncratic take on music in the post-punk age. Emerging from the gaps in between the notes are new ways of hearing the history of punk, the political and economic turbulence of the late 1970s, and the world that surrounds us right now.

Young Marble Giants' Colossal Youth (33 1/3)

by Michael Blair Joe Bucciero

Welsh post-punk band Young Marble Giants released one LP in 1980 and then, like their vanishing portraits on the album's cover, disappeared. Even though Colossal Youth received positive reviews and sold surprisingly well, Young Marble Giants quickly slid into the margins of rock 'n' roll history-relegated to cult status among post-punk and indie rock fans. Their lasting appeal owes itself to the band's singular approach and response to punk rock. Instead of employing overt political ideology and abrasive sounds to rebel against the status quo, Young Marble Giants filled their songs with restraint, ambiguity, and silence. The trio opened up their music to new sounds and ideas that redefined punk's rules of rebellion.Where did their rebellious ideas and impulses come from? By tracing Colossal Youth's artistic origins from Ancient Greece to the 20th-century avant-garde, Michael Blair and Joe Bucciero uncover the intricacies of Young Marble Giants' idiosyncratic take on music in the post-punk age. Emerging from the gaps in between the notes are new ways of hearing the history of punk, the political and economic turbulence of the late 1970s, and the world that surrounds us right now.

You'll Know When You Get There: Herbie Hancock and the Mwandishi Band

by Bob Gluck

As the 1960s ended, Herbie Hancock embarked on a grand creative experiment. Having just been dismissed from the celebrated Miles Davis Quintet, he set out on the road, playing with his first touring group as a leader until he eventually formed what would become a revolutionary band. Taking the Swahili name Mwandishi, the group would go on to play some of the most innovative music of the 1970s, fusing an assortment of musical genres, American and African cultures, and acoustic and electronic sounds into groundbreaking experiments that helped shape the American popular music that followed. In You’ll Know When You Get There, Bob Gluck offers the first comprehensive study of this influential group, mapping the musical, technological, political, and cultural changes that they not only lived in but also effected. Beginning with Hancock’s formative years as a sideman in bebop and hard bop ensembles, his work with Miles Davis, and the early recordings under his own name, Gluck uncovers the many ingredients that would come to form the Mwandishi sound. He offers an extensive series of interviews with Hancock and other band members, the producer and engineer who worked with them, and a catalog of well-known musicians who were profoundly influenced by the group. Paying close attention to the Mwandishi band’s repertoire, he analyzes a wide array of recordings—many little known—and examines the group’s instrumentation, their pioneering use of electronics, and their transformation of the studio into a compositional tool. From protofunk rhythms to synthesizers to the reclamation of African identities, Gluck tells the story of a highly peculiar and thrillingly unpredictable band that became a hallmark of American genius.

You'll Know When You Get There: Herbie Hancock and the Mwandishi Band

by Bob Gluck

As the 1960s ended, Herbie Hancock embarked on a grand creative experiment. Having just been dismissed from the celebrated Miles Davis Quintet, he set out on the road, playing with his first touring group as a leader until he eventually formed what would become a revolutionary band. Taking the Swahili name Mwandishi, the group would go on to play some of the most innovative music of the 1970s, fusing an assortment of musical genres, American and African cultures, and acoustic and electronic sounds into groundbreaking experiments that helped shape the American popular music that followed. In You’ll Know When You Get There, Bob Gluck offers the first comprehensive study of this influential group, mapping the musical, technological, political, and cultural changes that they not only lived in but also effected. Beginning with Hancock’s formative years as a sideman in bebop and hard bop ensembles, his work with Miles Davis, and the early recordings under his own name, Gluck uncovers the many ingredients that would come to form the Mwandishi sound. He offers an extensive series of interviews with Hancock and other band members, the producer and engineer who worked with them, and a catalog of well-known musicians who were profoundly influenced by the group. Paying close attention to the Mwandishi band’s repertoire, he analyzes a wide array of recordings—many little known—and examines the group’s instrumentation, their pioneering use of electronics, and their transformation of the studio into a compositional tool. From protofunk rhythms to synthesizers to the reclamation of African identities, Gluck tells the story of a highly peculiar and thrillingly unpredictable band that became a hallmark of American genius.

You'll Know When You Get There: Herbie Hancock and the Mwandishi Band

by Bob Gluck

As the 1960s ended, Herbie Hancock embarked on a grand creative experiment. Having just been dismissed from the celebrated Miles Davis Quintet, he set out on the road, playing with his first touring group as a leader until he eventually formed what would become a revolutionary band. Taking the Swahili name Mwandishi, the group would go on to play some of the most innovative music of the 1970s, fusing an assortment of musical genres, American and African cultures, and acoustic and electronic sounds into groundbreaking experiments that helped shape the American popular music that followed. In You’ll Know When You Get There, Bob Gluck offers the first comprehensive study of this influential group, mapping the musical, technological, political, and cultural changes that they not only lived in but also effected. Beginning with Hancock’s formative years as a sideman in bebop and hard bop ensembles, his work with Miles Davis, and the early recordings under his own name, Gluck uncovers the many ingredients that would come to form the Mwandishi sound. He offers an extensive series of interviews with Hancock and other band members, the producer and engineer who worked with them, and a catalog of well-known musicians who were profoundly influenced by the group. Paying close attention to the Mwandishi band’s repertoire, he analyzes a wide array of recordings—many little known—and examines the group’s instrumentation, their pioneering use of electronics, and their transformation of the studio into a compositional tool. From protofunk rhythms to synthesizers to the reclamation of African identities, Gluck tells the story of a highly peculiar and thrillingly unpredictable band that became a hallmark of American genius.

You'll Know When You Get There: Herbie Hancock and the Mwandishi Band

by Bob Gluck

As the 1960s ended, Herbie Hancock embarked on a grand creative experiment. Having just been dismissed from the celebrated Miles Davis Quintet, he set out on the road, playing with his first touring group as a leader until he eventually formed what would become a revolutionary band. Taking the Swahili name Mwandishi, the group would go on to play some of the most innovative music of the 1970s, fusing an assortment of musical genres, American and African cultures, and acoustic and electronic sounds into groundbreaking experiments that helped shape the American popular music that followed. In You’ll Know When You Get There, Bob Gluck offers the first comprehensive study of this influential group, mapping the musical, technological, political, and cultural changes that they not only lived in but also effected. Beginning with Hancock’s formative years as a sideman in bebop and hard bop ensembles, his work with Miles Davis, and the early recordings under his own name, Gluck uncovers the many ingredients that would come to form the Mwandishi sound. He offers an extensive series of interviews with Hancock and other band members, the producer and engineer who worked with them, and a catalog of well-known musicians who were profoundly influenced by the group. Paying close attention to the Mwandishi band’s repertoire, he analyzes a wide array of recordings—many little known—and examines the group’s instrumentation, their pioneering use of electronics, and their transformation of the studio into a compositional tool. From protofunk rhythms to synthesizers to the reclamation of African identities, Gluck tells the story of a highly peculiar and thrillingly unpredictable band that became a hallmark of American genius.

You'll Know When You Get There: Herbie Hancock and the Mwandishi Band

by Bob Gluck

As the 1960s ended, Herbie Hancock embarked on a grand creative experiment. Having just been dismissed from the celebrated Miles Davis Quintet, he set out on the road, playing with his first touring group as a leader until he eventually formed what would become a revolutionary band. Taking the Swahili name Mwandishi, the group would go on to play some of the most innovative music of the 1970s, fusing an assortment of musical genres, American and African cultures, and acoustic and electronic sounds into groundbreaking experiments that helped shape the American popular music that followed. In You’ll Know When You Get There, Bob Gluck offers the first comprehensive study of this influential group, mapping the musical, technological, political, and cultural changes that they not only lived in but also effected. Beginning with Hancock’s formative years as a sideman in bebop and hard bop ensembles, his work with Miles Davis, and the early recordings under his own name, Gluck uncovers the many ingredients that would come to form the Mwandishi sound. He offers an extensive series of interviews with Hancock and other band members, the producer and engineer who worked with them, and a catalog of well-known musicians who were profoundly influenced by the group. Paying close attention to the Mwandishi band’s repertoire, he analyzes a wide array of recordings—many little known—and examines the group’s instrumentation, their pioneering use of electronics, and their transformation of the studio into a compositional tool. From protofunk rhythms to synthesizers to the reclamation of African identities, Gluck tells the story of a highly peculiar and thrillingly unpredictable band that became a hallmark of American genius.

You'll Know When You Get There: Herbie Hancock and the Mwandishi Band

by Bob Gluck

As the 1960s ended, Herbie Hancock embarked on a grand creative experiment. Having just been dismissed from the celebrated Miles Davis Quintet, he set out on the road, playing with his first touring group as a leader until he eventually formed what would become a revolutionary band. Taking the Swahili name Mwandishi, the group would go on to play some of the most innovative music of the 1970s, fusing an assortment of musical genres, American and African cultures, and acoustic and electronic sounds into groundbreaking experiments that helped shape the American popular music that followed. In You’ll Know When You Get There, Bob Gluck offers the first comprehensive study of this influential group, mapping the musical, technological, political, and cultural changes that they not only lived in but also effected. Beginning with Hancock’s formative years as a sideman in bebop and hard bop ensembles, his work with Miles Davis, and the early recordings under his own name, Gluck uncovers the many ingredients that would come to form the Mwandishi sound. He offers an extensive series of interviews with Hancock and other band members, the producer and engineer who worked with them, and a catalog of well-known musicians who were profoundly influenced by the group. Paying close attention to the Mwandishi band’s repertoire, he analyzes a wide array of recordings—many little known—and examines the group’s instrumentation, their pioneering use of electronics, and their transformation of the studio into a compositional tool. From protofunk rhythms to synthesizers to the reclamation of African identities, Gluck tells the story of a highly peculiar and thrillingly unpredictable band that became a hallmark of American genius.

You Only Rock Once: My Life in Music

by Jerry Blavat

Jerry Blavat's rockin' life story pulses with celebrity names, infamous episodes and "offers readers an insider's view into the golden era of rock and roll and pop music and entertainment" raves Publishers Weekly. The long-awaited autobiography of entertainment icon Jerry Blavat, You Only Rock Once is the wildly entertaining and unfiltered story of the man whose career began at the age of 13 on the TV dance show Bandstand and became a music legend. Lifelong friendships with the likes of Sammy Davis Jr. and Frank Sinatra, a controversial relationship with Philadelphia Mafia boss Angelo Bruno that resulted in a decade-long FBI investigation, and much more colors this amazing journey from the early 60s through today. Now, some 50 years after his first radio gig, Blavat puts it all in perspective in this uniquely American tale of a "little cockroach kid" borne out of the immigrant experience who lived the American Dream.

You Never Give Me Your Money: The Battle For The Soul Of The Beatles

by Peter Doggett

When Paul McCartney told the world in 1970 that he had no plans to work with the Beatles again, it was widely viewed as a cultural tragedy by the media and public alike. But one of the most fascinating phases of the Beatles' story was just about to begin. Now, for the first time, You Never Give Me Your Money tells the dramatic story of the Fab Four post 1969. It charts the almost Shakespearean rivalry of the Lennon and McCartney families, the conflict in George Harrison's life between spirituality and fame, and Richard Starkey's efforts to conquer his personal demons. It also chronicles the transformation of their multi-media company, Apple Corps, from a bastion of 1960s counter-culture into a corporate behemoth. From court battles to chart success, the best of rock'n'roll writers, Peter Doggett traces the untold story of a group and a legacy that will never be forgotten.

You Don't Have To Say You Love Me

by Simon Napier-Bell

You probably know Simon Napier-Bell as the manager of the Yardbirds. Or you may know him as the man who managed Marc Bolan, or Japan. You should definitely know him as the man who managed Wham! And if none of these rings a bell, maybe you'll remember him as the man who co-wrote 'You Don't Have To Say You Love Me' for Dusty Springfield. You Don't Have To Say You Love Me is one of the funniest books you will read and equally provoking. From his revelation that the entire music industry was motivated by sex, to an embarrassing come-on from a suicidal Brian Epstein, it's all shocking stuff. But when you're on the run from the German police with Marc Bolan, brothel-hopping with Keith Moon and generally living the life of Riley at the music industry's expense, it would be a shame not to share those amazing experiences with the rest of the world, wouldn't it? Of all the great pop-music books written, it is worth savouring You Don't Have To Say You Love Me for its brilliant sideways insight into one of the most exciting cultural periods Britain has ever seen.

You Are the Music: How Music Reveals What it Means to be Human

by Victoria Williamson

'You are the music / While the music lasts' T.S. Eliot, The Four Quartets Do babies remember music from the womb? Can classical music increase your child’s IQ? Is music good for productivity? Can it aid recovery from illness and injury? And what is going on in your brain when Ultravox’s ‘Vienna’, Schoenberg’s Verklärte Nacht or Dizzee Rascal’s ‘Bonkers’ transports you back to teenage years? In a brilliant new work that will delight music lovers of every persuasion, music psychologist Victoria Williamson examines our relationship with music across the whole of a lifetime. Along the way she reveals the amazing ways in which music can physically reshape our brains, explores how ‘smart music listening’ can improve cognitive performance, and considers the perennial puzzle of what causes ‘earworms’. Requiring no specialist musical or scientific knowledge, this upbeat, eye-opening book reveals as never before the extent of the universal language of music that lives deep inside us all.

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