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Bicycle (Large Print)


This bicycle is shown from the side. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the right way up. The handlebars are on the top left of the page. They have been turned to face you so both handle grips can be found. The handlebars are connected to the front wheel via the frame. Connected to the frame in the top right of the image is the saddle, below this are two pedals and a chain which links to the rear wheel on the right.

Bicycle (UEB Contracted)


This bicycle is shown from the side. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the right way up. The handlebars are on the top left of the page. They have been turned to face you so both handle grips can be found. The handlebars are connected to the front wheel via the frame. Connected to the frame in the top right of the image is the saddle, below this are two pedals and a chain which links to the rear wheel on the right.

Bicycle (UEB uncontracted)


This bicycle is shown from the side. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the right way up. The handlebars are on the top left of the page. They have been turned to face you so both handle grips can be found. The handlebars are connected to the front wheel via the frame. Connected to the frame in the top right of the image is the saddle, below this are two pedals and a chain which links to the rear wheel on the right.

Paralympic 5-a-side football (Large Print)


This page has three images on it: a player trying to stop an opponent passing the ball, two players trying to gain possession of the ball, and a diagram showing the layout of a 5-a-side pitch. All players have sight problems and wear blindfolds. The ball makes a noise to help players locate it and sighted goalkeepers are allowed to shout instructions to players. Each image has a dashed line image border. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up. Player trying to stop an opponent passing the ball. - The image on the top left of the page shows two players and a football. The player to the left is facing to the right, his face in profile and his body twisted so it is facing you. He has his arms extended out to the left and right. One leg is going down the page and left, the other is reaching out to the right and almost touching the ball further right. On the right of the image, an opposing player is facing left with his face in profile and his body turned to face you. His arms reach out to the left and right. He has his foot to the right lifted up, ready to kick the ball and pass it to a teammate.Two players trying to gain possession of the ball - This image, at the bottom left of the page, shows two players and a football. On the left of the image, a player is seen from the side facing right. He has his arms stretched out to the left and right and he is supported on one leg, while his other leg extends out to the right trying to make contact with the ball above. The opposing player on the right of the image is facing left and seen from the side. With his arms stretched out to the left and right, he is running towards the other player to tackle him and try to take possession of the ball.Diagram of a 5-a-side football pitc: This diagram is on the right of the page. The two teams are represented by large dots and crosses. At the top of the image is a goal shown as a small rectangle. Down the page from this is the penalty area and penalty spot. Going across horizontally in the centre of the image, is the halfway line, with the centre spot and centre circle in the middle. The layout in the top of the diagram is mirrored in the bottom. The playing area is 140 feet x 85 feet. The two teams, dots and crosses, have adopted different playing positions. Apart from the last man's in defence near the goal, many teams do not have fixed roles for players. This allows a more fluid game with players reacting to the game as it progresses.

Paralympic 5-a-side football (UEB Contracted)


This page has three images on it: a player trying to stop an opponent passing the ball, two players trying to gain possession of the ball, and a diagram showing the layout of a 5-a-side pitch. All players have sight problems and wear blindfolds. The ball makes a noise to help players locate it and sighted goalkeepers are allowed to shout instructions to players. Each image has a dashed line image border. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up. Player trying to stop an opponent passing the ball. - The image on the top left of the page shows two players and a football. The player to the left is facing to the right, his face in profile and his body twisted so it is facing you. He has his arms extended out to the left and right. One leg is going down the page and left, the other is reaching out to the right and almost touching the ball further right. On the right of the image, an opposing player is facing left with his face in profile and his body turned to face you. His arms reach out to the left and right. He has his foot to the right lifted up, ready to kick the ball and pass it to a teammate.Two players trying to gain possession of the ball - This image, at the bottom left of the page, shows two players and a football. On the left of the image, a player is seen from the side facing right. He has his arms stretched out to the left and right and he is supported on one leg, while his other leg extends out to the right trying to make contact with the ball above. The opposing player on the right of the image is facing left and seen from the side. With his arms stretched out to the left and right, he is running towards the other player to tackle him and try to take possession of the ball.Diagram of a 5-a-side football pitc: This diagram is on the right of the page. The two teams are represented by large dots and crosses. At the top of the image is a goal shown as a small rectangle. Down the page from this is the penalty area and penalty spot. Going across horizontally in the centre of the image, is the halfway line, with the centre spot and centre circle in the middle. The layout in the top of the diagram is mirrored in the bottom. The playing area is 140 feet x 85 feet. The two teams, dots and crosses, have adopted different playing positions. Apart from the last man's in defence near the goal, many teams do not have fixed roles for players. This allows a more fluid game with players reacting to the game as it progresses.

Paralympic 5-a-side football (UEB Uncontracted)


This page has three images on it: a player trying to stop an opponent passing the ball, two players trying to gain possession of the ball, and a diagram showing the layout of a 5-a-side pitch. All players have sight problems and wear blindfolds. The ball makes a noise to help players locate it and sighted goalkeepers are allowed to shout instructions to players. Each image has a dashed line image border. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up. Player trying to stop an opponent passing the ball. - The image on the top left of the page shows two players and a football. The player to the left is facing to the right, his face in profile and his body twisted so it is facing you. He has his arms extended out to the left and right. One leg is going down the page and left, the other is reaching out to the right and almost touching the ball further right. On the right of the image, an opposing player is facing left with his face in profile and his body turned to face you. His arms reach out to the left and right. He has his foot to the right lifted up, ready to kick the ball and pass it to a teammate.Two players trying to gain possession of the ball - This image, at the bottom left of the page, shows two players and a football. On the left of the image, a player is seen from the side facing right. He has his arms stretched out to the left and right and he is supported on one leg, while his other leg extends out to the right trying to make contact with the ball above. The opposing player on the right of the image is facing left and seen from the side. With his arms stretched out to the left and right, he is running towards the other player to tackle him and try to take possession of the ball.Diagram of a 5-a-side football pitc: This diagram is on the right of the page. The two teams are represented by large dots and crosses. At the top of the image is a goal shown as a small rectangle. Down the page from this is the penalty area and penalty spot. Going across horizontally in the centre of the image, is the halfway line, with the centre spot and centre circle in the middle. The layout in the top of the diagram is mirrored in the bottom. The playing area is 140 feet x 85 feet. The two teams, dots and crosses, have adopted different playing positions. Apart from the last man's in defence near the goal, many teams do not have fixed roles for players. This allows a more fluid game with players reacting to the game as it progresses.

Paralympic 7-a-side football (Large Print)


This page has three images on it: a player trying win the ball from an opponent, a goalkeeper attempting to save a ball, and a diagram showing the layout of a 7-a-side pitch. Players have cerebral palsy or stroke damage of varying severity. Each image has a dashed line image border. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up.A player trying win the ball from an opponent - The image on the top left of the page shows two players and a ball. The player on the left of the image is seen from the side and facing right, so only one eye can be found. He has his arms stretched out to the left and right. He is running, and one leg extends straight to the left. On the right, his other leg is bent with the ball on the ground, just to the right of his foot. The player to the right of the image is seen from the side facing to the left so that only one eye can be found. He has his arms stretched out left and right. His leg to the left is controlling the ball to the left of his foot. To the right his other leg is bent to the right, ready to swing left and kick the ball away from his opponent.A goalkeeper attempting to save a ball - This image, at the bottom left of the page, shows a goalkeeper, a ball and part of the goal net. The goalkeeper has leapt towards the ball, which is in the top left of the image. He has his arms outstretched and his hands are near the ball, ready to catch it. The rest of the keepers body extends diagonally down across the page with both of his legs stretched out in the bottom right of the image. The square grid of the goal net can be found filling the remainder of the image border.Diagram of 7-a-side football pitch - This diagram on the right of the page shows the football pitch and seven members of each team. The players are represented here by large dots and crosses. The pitch is 40 metres wide by 60 metres long. At the top centre of the page there is a small rectangle representing a goal. Down the page from this are the goal area with a goalkeeper, and the penalty area with the penalty spot. Down again is the penalty arc; all players must stay outside of this area when a penalty is being taken. Further down the page are the centre circle, the centre spot, and the centre line going across the image horizontally. At the bottom of the image is the opposing team's goal and penalty area.

Paralympic 7-a-side football (UEB Contracted)


This page has three images on it: a player trying win the ball from an opponent, a goalkeeper attempting to save a ball, and a diagram showing the layout of a 7-a-side pitch. Players have cerebral palsy or stroke damage of varying severity. Each image has a dashed line image border. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up.A player trying win the ball from an opponent - The image on the top left of the page shows two players and a ball. The player on the left of the image is seen from the side and facing right, so only one eye can be found. He has his arms stretched out to the left and right. He is running, and one leg extends straight to the left. On the right, his other leg is bent with the ball on the ground, just to the right of his foot. The player to the right of the image is seen from the side facing to the left so that only one eye can be found. He has his arms stretched out left and right. His leg to the left is controlling the ball to the left of his foot. To the right his other leg is bent to the right, ready to swing left and kick the ball away from his opponent.A goalkeeper attempting to save a ball - This image, at the bottom left of the page, shows a goalkeeper, a ball and part of the goal net. The goalkeeper has leapt towards the ball, which is in the top left of the image. He has his arms outstretched and his hands are near the ball, ready to catch it. The rest of the keepers body extends diagonally down across the page with both of his legs stretched out in the bottom right of the image. The square grid of the goal net can be found filling the remainder of the image border.Diagram of 7-a-side football pitch - This diagram on the right of the page shows the football pitch and seven members of each team. The players are represented here by large dots and crosses. The pitch is 40 metres wide by 60 metres long. At the top centre of the page there is a small rectangle representing a goal. Down the page from this are the goal area with a goalkeeper, and the penalty area with the penalty spot. Down again is the penalty arc; all players must stay outside of this area when a penalty is being taken. Further down the page are the centre circle, the centre spot, and the centre line going across the image horizontally. At the bottom of the image is the opposing team's goal and penalty area.

Paralympic 7-a-side football (UEB Uncontracted)


This page has three images on it: a player trying win the ball from an opponent, a goalkeeper attempting to save a ball, and a diagram showing the layout of a 7-a-side pitch. Players have cerebral palsy or stroke damage of varying severity. Each image has a dashed line image border. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up.A player trying win the ball from an opponent - The image on the top left of the page shows two players and a ball. The player on the left of the image is seen from the side and facing right, so only one eye can be found. He has his arms stretched out to the left and right. He is running, and one leg extends straight to the left. On the right, his other leg is bent with the ball on the ground, just to the right of his foot. The player to the right of the image is seen from the side facing to the left so that only one eye can be found. He has his arms stretched out left and right. His leg to the left is controlling the ball to the left of his foot. To the right his other leg is bent to the right, ready to swing left and kick the ball away from his opponent.A goalkeeper attempting to save a ball - This image, at the bottom left of the page, shows a goalkeeper, a ball and part of the goal net. The goalkeeper has leapt towards the ball, which is in the top left of the image. He has his arms outstretched and his hands are near the ball, ready to catch it. The rest of the keepers body extends diagonally down across the page with both of his legs stretched out in the bottom right of the image. The square grid of the goal net can be found filling the remainder of the image border.Diagram of 7-a-side football pitch - This diagram on the right of the page shows the football pitch and seven members of each team. The players are represented here by large dots and crosses. The pitch is 40 metres wide by 60 metres long. At the top centre of the page there is a small rectangle representing a goal. Down the page from this are the goal area with a goalkeeper, and the penalty area with the penalty spot. Down again is the penalty arc; all players must stay outside of this area when a penalty is being taken. Further down the page are the centre circle, the centre spot, and the centre line going across the image horizontally. At the bottom of the image is the opposing team's goal and penalty area.

Paralympic archery (Large Print)

by Rnib Bookshare

There are two images on this page: an archer in a wheelchair taking aim at the target, and a one-armed archer using his mouth to release an arrow. Each image has a dashed line image border. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up.Archer in a wheelchair - This image is on the left of the page. It shows an archer in a wheelchair. He is facing you but his head is turned to the right, so that only one eye can be found. The archer's head is just above and to the left of the image's centre. Down and to the left is one of his arms. It goes to the left, then bending at the elbow it goes right to his hand, which is obscuring part of his chin and neck. The hand is pulling the string of the bow back and holding the arrow, which he is aiming at a target to the right, beyond the image border. His other arm is stretched out horizontally to the right, where his hand holds the bow's handgrip. The bow has a sight (an aid to accurate aiming) fixed to the handgrip above his hand. The bow arcs left, up and down the page from the archers hand on the right. The bow's string is attached to the tips at the top and bottom of the bow and is being pulled back and tensioned by the archer's hand near his head. The arrow can be found parallel to and above the archer's arm on the right. The archer's body and legs are down the page from his head. He is seated on the wheelchair, which has its wheels to the left and right of his feet.One-armed archer using his mouth to release an arrow - This image, on the right of the page, shows an archer whose arm has been amputated at the shoulder, aiming at a target to the right, beyond the image border. He is standing facing you with his head turned to the right on the left centre of the image. He is wearing a baseball cap with the peak to the back and he has a beard. He is holding the knock (slotted end) of the arrow in his mouth, the string of the bow pulled back under tension, the arrow going across the page horizontally to the right. The archer's arm goes across the page from below his chin to the handgrip of the bow on the right; to the left he has a leather chest protector strapped on. The bow arcs left, up and down the page from the archers hand on the right. It has a sight attached to the handgrip. The bow's string is attached to the tips at the top and bottom

Paralympic archery (UEB Uncontracted)


There are two images on this page: an archer in a wheelchair taking aim at the target, and a one-armed archer using his mouth to release an arrow. Each image has a dashed line image border. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up.Archer in a wheelchair - This image is on the left of the page. It shows an archer in a wheelchair. He is facing you but his head is turned to the right, so that only one eye can be found. The archer's head is just above and to the left of the image's centre. Down and to the left is one of his arms. It goes to the left, then bending at the elbow it goes right to his hand, which is obscuring part of his chin and neck. The hand is pulling the string of the bow back and holding the arrow, which he is aiming at a target to the right, beyond the image border. His other arm is stretched out horizontally to the right, where his hand holds the bow's handgrip. The bow has a sight (an aid to accurate aiming) fixed to the handgrip above his hand. The bow arcs left, up and down the page from the archers hand on the right. The bow's string is attached to the tips at the top and bottom of the bow and is being pulled back and tensioned by the archer's hand near his head. The arrow can be found parallel to and above the archer's arm on the right. The archer's body and legs are down the page from his head. He is seated on the wheelchair, which has its wheels to the left and right of his feet.One-armed archer using his mouth to release an arrow - This image, on the right of the page, shows an archer whose arm has been amputated at the shoulder, aiming at a target to the right, beyond the image border. He is standing facing you with his head turned to the right on the left centre of the image. He is wearing a baseball cap with the peak to the back and he has a beard. He is holding the knock (slotted end) of the arrow in his mouth, the string of the bow pulled back under tension, the arrow going across the page horizontally to the right. The archer's arm goes across the page from below his chin to the handgrip of the bow on the right; to the left he has a leather chest protector strapped on. The bow arcs left, up and down the page from the archers hand on the right. It has a sight attached to the handgrip. The bow's string is attached to the tips at the top and bottom

Paralympic archery (UEB Contracted)


There are two images on this page: an archer in a wheelchair taking aim at the target, and a one-armed archer using his mouth to release an arrow. Each image has a dashed line image border. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up.Archer in a wheelchair - This image is on the left of the page. It shows an archer in a wheelchair. He is facing you but his head is turned to the right, so that only one eye can be found. The archer's head is just above and to the left of the image's centre. Down and to the left is one of his arms. It goes to the left, then bending at the elbow it goes right to his hand, which is obscuring part of his chin and neck. The hand is pulling the string of the bow back and holding the arrow, which he is aiming at a target to the right, beyond the image border. His other arm is stretched out horizontally to the right, where his hand holds the bow's handgrip. The bow has a sight (an aid to accurate aiming) fixed to the handgrip above his hand. The bow arcs left, up and down the page from the archers hand on the right. The bow's string is attached to the tips at the top and bottom of the bow and is being pulled back and tensioned by the archer's hand near his head. The arrow can be found parallel to and above the archer's arm on the right. The archer's body and legs are down the page from his head. He is seated on the wheelchair, which has its wheels to the left and right of his feet.One-armed archer using his mouth to release an arrow - This image, on the right of the page, shows an archer whose arm has been amputated at the shoulder, aiming at a target to the right, beyond the image border. He is standing facing you with his head turned to the right on the left centre of the image. He is wearing a baseball cap with the peak to the back and he has a beard. He is holding the knock (slotted end) of the arrow in his mouth, the string of the bow pulled back under tension, the arrow going across the page horizontally to the right. The archer's arm goes across the page from below his chin to the handgrip of the bow on the right; to the left he has a leather chest protector strapped on. The bow arcs left, up and down the page from the archers hand on the right. It has a sight attached to the handgrip. The bow's string is attached to the tips at the top and bottom

Paralympic basketball (Large Print)


This page has three images on it: two players trying to catch the ball, a player throwing at the net and a player dribbling the ball. All of the players have limited lower body movement and are competing in wheelchairs. Each image has a dashed line image border. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up. Two opposing players trying to catch the ball - The image on the left of the page shows two players reaching up to catch a ball. The player to the left is facing you with her head turned to the right, so only one of her eyes can be seen. She is reaching up with both arms trying to catch the ball, which is just up the page from her arm on the right. She has moved with so much force that one of her chair's wheels, in the bottom left of the image, has left the ground. The player on the right is seen from the side, facing right. She has her head turned towards you, so that all her facial features can be found. To the left of her head she has an arm held up, attempting to catch the ball. Her other arm is held out to the right. Down the page is her wheelchair, facing right with one of its large round wheels seen from the side on the left and a small stabilising wheel on the right.Player throwing at the net - This image, at the top right of the page, shows two players and a basketball net. On the left of the image, a player is seen from the side facing right. She has just thrown the ball towards the net in the top right of the image and her arm is held out to the right. To her right is an opposing player, who is in her wheelchair facing you with her head turned to the left. She is reaching out to the left, trying to block the ball, and is holding onto the wheelchair with her hand to the right.Player dribbling the ball - This image, on the bottom right of the page, shows two players seen from the side. On the left of the image, a player is facing to the right. She has an arm held out to the right and is bouncing the ball, further right, in mid air. On the right of the image is an opposing player facing to the left. She has both arms held up, trying to stop the other player passing the ball.

Paralympic basketball (UEB Contracted)


This page has three images on it: two players trying to catch the ball, a player throwing at the net and a player dribbling the ball. All of the players have limited lower body movement and are competing in wheelchairs. Each image has a dashed line image border. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up. Two opposing players trying to catch the ball - The image on the left of the page shows two players reaching up to catch a ball. The player to the left is facing you with her head turned to the right, so only one of her eyes can be seen. She is reaching up with both arms trying to catch the ball, which is just up the page from her arm on the right. She has moved with so much force that one of her chair's wheels, in the bottom left of the image, has left the ground. The player on the right is seen from the side, facing right. She has her head turned towards you, so that all her facial features can be found. To the left of her head she has an arm held up, attempting to catch the ball. Her other arm is held out to the right. Down the page is her wheelchair, facing right with one of its large round wheels seen from the side on the left and a small stabilising wheel on the right.Player throwing at the net - This image, at the top right of the page, shows two players and a basketball net. On the left of the image, a player is seen from the side facing right. She has just thrown the ball towards the net in the top right of the image and her arm is held out to the right. To her right is an opposing player, who is in her wheelchair facing you with her head turned to the left. She is reaching out to the left, trying to block the ball, and is holding onto the wheelchair with her hand to the right.Player dribbling the ball - This image, on the bottom right of the page, shows two players seen from the side. On the left of the image, a player is facing to the right. She has an arm held out to the right and is bouncing the ball, further right, in mid air. On the right of the image is an opposing player facing to the left. She has both arms held up, trying to stop the other player passing the ball.

Paralympic basketball (UEB Uncontracted)


This page has three images on it: two players trying to catch the ball, a player throwing at the net and a player dribbling the ball. All of the players have limited lower body movement and are competing in wheelchairs. Each image has a dashed line image border. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up. Two opposing players trying to catch the ball - The image on the left of the page shows two players reaching up to catch a ball. The player to the left is facing you with her head turned to the right, so only one of her eyes can be seen. She is reaching up with both arms trying to catch the ball, which is just up the page from her arm on the right. She has moved with so much force that one of her chair's wheels, in the bottom left of the image, has left the ground. The player on the right is seen from the side, facing right. She has her head turned towards you, so that all her facial features can be found. To the left of her head she has an arm held up, attempting to catch the ball. Her other arm is held out to the right. Down the page is her wheelchair, facing right with one of its large round wheels seen from the side on the left and a small stabilising wheel on the right.Player throwing at the net - This image, at the top right of the page, shows two players and a basketball net. On the left of the image, a player is seen from the side facing right. She has just thrown the ball towards the net in the top right of the image and her arm is held out to the right. To her right is an opposing player, who is in her wheelchair facing you with her head turned to the left. She is reaching out to the left, trying to block the ball, and is holding onto the wheelchair with her hand to the right.Player dribbling the ball - This image, on the bottom right of the page, shows two players seen from the side. On the left of the image, a player is facing to the right. She has an arm held out to the right and is bouncing the ball, further right, in mid air. On the right of the image is an opposing player facing to the left. She has both arms held up, trying to stop the other player passing the ball.

Paralympic Boccia (Large Print)


On this page, there are four images: a Boccia contestant playing a ball, two sets (red and blue) of six Boccia balls in a case with a white jack ball, an image of a jack with two red and two blue balls, and a diagram of the layout of a Boccia court. Paralympic Boccia is only open to people with cerebral palsy or a motor skills disability. Each image has a dashed line image border. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up. Boccia contestant playing a ball (top left) - This image is on the top left of the page. It shows a player, seen from the side so only one of his arms and one of his legs can be found. He lacks strength in his arms and trunk. He is using a ramp to help him aim his red ball at the jack to the right. The jack cannot be found as it is beyond the image border. He is in a motorised wheelchair. The player's head is near the top left of the image. Down the page are his shoulders and his arm extending out to his hand on the right. Slightly up the page from his hand, you can find the top of the ramp with the red ball about to roll down the ramp to the right. Down the page from his shoulders is his body sitting on the wheelchair with his leg and foot to the right. The front wheel of the chair is down and left from his foot and the rear is to the left again. Two sets of Boccia balls (bottom left) - This image shows a top view of a box with fifteen square compartments. There are six red balls in the compartments on the left of the box and six blue on the right. The jack ball is in the top centre of the box with two empty compartments down the page. Jack with two red and two blue balls (bottom centre) - This image shows five Boccia balls: two red on the left of the image and two blue on the right. The jack is in the centre of the image. There is a dashed line from it to the red ball to the left and down, showing that this is the nearest ball to the jack. Diagram of a Boccia court (right) - At the bottom of this image are six rectangular player boxes in a horizontal row. Each contestant has a box from which all his or her balls are thrown. A player may not leave the box until all the players have thrown all of their six balls. Up the page from these are two diagonal lines that meet in the centre. A thrown ball must pass beyond these to be valid. Further up the page is a cross. If the jack is knocked out of the court during play or if there is a tiebreak, it is placed here. The horizontal line across the top of the image marks the end of the court.

Paralympic Boccia (UEB Contracted)


On this page, there are four images: a Boccia contestant playing a ball, two sets (red and blue) of six Boccia balls in a case with a white jack ball, an image of a jack with two red and two blue balls, and a diagram of the layout of a Boccia court. Paralympic Boccia is only open to people with cerebral palsy or a motor skills disability. Each image has a dashed line image border. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up. Boccia contestant playing a ball (top left) - This image is on the top left of the page. It shows a player, seen from the side so only one of his arms and one of his legs can be found. He lacks strength in his arms and trunk. He is using a ramp to help him aim his red ball at the jack to the right. The jack cannot be found as it is beyond the image border. He is in a motorised wheelchair. The player's head is near the top left of the image. Down the page are his shoulders and his arm extending out to his hand on the right. Slightly up the page from his hand, you can find the top of the ramp with the red ball about to roll down the ramp to the right. Down the page from his shoulders is his body sitting on the wheelchair with his leg and foot to the right. The front wheel of the chair is down and left from his foot and the rear is to the left again. Two sets of Boccia balls (bottom left) - This image shows a top view of a box with fifteen square compartments. There are six red balls in the compartments on the left of the box and six blue on the right. The jack ball is in the top centre of the box with two empty compartments down the page. Jack with two red and two blue balls (bottom centre) - This image shows five Boccia balls: two red on the left of the image and two blue on the right. The jack is in the centre of the image. There is a dashed line from it to the red ball to the left and down, showing that this is the nearest ball to the jack. Diagram of a Boccia court (right) - At the bottom of this image are six rectangular player boxes in a horizontal row. Each contestant has a box from which all his or her balls are thrown. A player may not leave the box until all the players have thrown all of their six balls. Up the page from these are two diagonal lines that meet in the centre. A thrown ball must pass beyond these to be valid. Further up the page is a cross. If the jack is knocked out of the court during play or if there is a tiebreak, it is placed here. The horizontal line across the top of the image marks the end of the court.

Paralympic Boccia (UEB Uncontracted)


On this page, there are four images: a Boccia contestant playing a ball, two sets (red and blue) of six Boccia balls in a case with a white jack ball, an image of a jack with two red and two blue balls, and a diagram of the layout of a Boccia court. Paralympic Boccia is only open to people with cerebral palsy or a motor skills disability. Each image has a dashed line image border. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up. Boccia contestant playing a ball (top left) - This image is on the top left of the page. It shows a player, seen from the side so only one of his arms and one of his legs can be found. He lacks strength in his arms and trunk. He is using a ramp to help him aim his red ball at the jack to the right. The jack cannot be found as it is beyond the image border. He is in a motorised wheelchair. The player's head is near the top left of the image. Down the page are his shoulders and his arm extending out to his hand on the right. Slightly up the page from his hand, you can find the top of the ramp with the red ball about to roll down the ramp to the right. Down the page from his shoulders is his body sitting on the wheelchair with his leg and foot to the right. The front wheel of the chair is down and left from his foot and the rear is to the left again. Two sets of Boccia balls (bottom left) - This image shows a top view of a box with fifteen square compartments. There are six red balls in the compartments on the left of the box and six blue on the right. The jack ball is in the top centre of the box with two empty compartments down the page. Jack with two red and two blue balls (bottom centre) - This image shows five Boccia balls: two red on the left of the image and two blue on the right. The jack is in the centre of the image. There is a dashed line from it to the red ball to the left and down, showing that this is the nearest ball to the jack. Diagram of a Boccia court (right) - At the bottom of this image are six rectangular player boxes in a horizontal row. Each contestant has a box from which all his or her balls are thrown. A player may not leave the box until all the players have thrown all of their six balls. Up the page from these are two diagonal lines that meet in the centre. A thrown ball must pass beyond these to be valid. Further up the page is a cross. If the jack is knocked out of the court during play or if there is a tiebreak, it is placed here. The horizontal line across the top of the image marks the end of the court.

Paralympic cycling - road (Large Print)


On this page, there are three images of riders on tricycles, one of a tandem with two riders and a top view of a tricycle. Each image has a dashed line image border. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up. Visually impaired cyclist with sighted teammate (top left) - This is an image of a visually impaired cyclist and his sighted teammate on a carbon fibre track-racing tandem. They are seen from the side and facing to the right. The VI rider's head, wearing a streamlined, tapered helmet, is in the top centre of the image. Just down from this are his arm and his hand holding the handlebars. Left from his head, his body curves left and then right to his knee. His leg continues down the page to his foot on a pedal. To the right of the VI rider is his sighted teammate, who steers the bike; he is dressed identically and is in a similar riding position. The bike's front wheel is on the right of the image and the rear is on the left. Parts of the bike's frame, chainwheels and chain can be found down from and between the riders.Rider on a recumbent hand tricycle (bottom left) - This image shows a competitor on a recumbent tricycle, seen from the side and facing to the right. He has no limb movement below the waist and has a weak abdomen. The trike's rear wheel is on the left of the image, with the rider's head and reclining body to the right. His arm goes up diagonally from the right of his head; his hand is holding one of the hand pedals. On the right of the image is the trike's front wheel, partly obscured by one of the rider's outstretched legs.Rider on a hand tricycle (top right) - This image shows a hand tricycle and rider, seen from the side and facing to the right. He has had both legs amputated at the thigh. The rear wheel of the trike is on the left of the image. Right of this is the back of the trike's seat and then the rider's body sitting on the seat. His head is in the top centre of the image, wearing a streamlined helmet. Down and left from the rider's head is his arm with his hand to the right holding a hand pedal. On the far right is the trike's front wheel with five spokes. Rider on a tricycle and top view of tricycle (two images at bottom right) - This is a pair of images: a rider and trike on the left and a trike seen from the top on the right. Rider on a tricycle This is an image of a rider on a tricycle seen from the front. She has cerebral palsy. Her head, wearing a helmet, is in the top centre of the image. All her facial features can be found. Down the page is her body with her arms to either side, going down to her hands holding the handlebars. Further down are her legs, and her feet on the trike's pedals. The trike's front wheel is in the bottom centre of the image. The back wheels are to the left and right of this. Top view of a tricycle - The two back wheels of the trike are at the top left and right of the image. The rear axle runs between them with two struts extending diagonally towards the saddle in the centre. Down the page are the two cranks and pedals. The frame of the trike continues further down the page to the handlebars and the front wheel.

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