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Thomas Bernhard's Afterlives (New Directions in German Studies)

by Stephen Dowden, Gregor Thuswaldner, and Olaf Berwald

In his prose fiction, memoirs, poetry, and drama, Thomas Bernhard (1931-1989)--one of the 20th century's most uniquely gifted writers--created a new and radical style, seemingly out of thin air. His books never “tell a story” in the received sense. Instead, he rages on the page, he rants and spews vitriol about the moral failures of his homeland, Austria, in the long amnesiac aftermath of the Second World War. Yet this furious prose, seemingly shapeless but composed with unparalleled musicality, and taxing by conventional standards, has been powerfully echoed in many writers since Bernhard's death in 1989. These explorers have found in Bernhard's singular accomplishment new paths for the expression of life and truth.Thomas Bernhard's Afterlives examines the international mobilization of Bernhard's style. Writers in Italian, German, Spanish, Hungarian, English, and French have succeeded in making Bernhard's Austrian vision an international vision. This book tells that story.

Last Ranger: The Cutthroat Cannibals - Book #8 (Last Ranger #8)

by Craig Sargent

An avalanche, a flood, wild warriors and dogs slow Martin Stone down a bit, but they cannot begin to compare with the hell he will face with a fanatical tribe of inhuman flesh eaters called The Hungry. All Stone has against them are his bare hands, his wits and his fiercely loyal pit bull.

The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works

by A. Spearing

Contains The Cloud of Unknowing, The Mystical Theology of Saint Denis, The Book of Privy Counselling, and An Epistle on Prayer. Against a tradition of devotional writings which focussed on knowing God through Christ's Passion and his humanity, these texts describe a transcendent God who exists beyond human knowledge and human language. These four texts are at the heart of medival mystical theology in their call for contemplation, calm, and above all, love, as the way to understand the Divine.

Imagist Poetry (Penguin Modern Classics)

by Peter Jones

Imagism was a brief, complex yet influential poetic movement of the early 1900s, a time of reaction against late nineteenth-century poetry which Ezra Pound, one of the key imagist poets, described as ‘a doughy mess of third-hand Keats, Wordsworth … half-melted, lumpy’. In contrast, imagist poetry, although riddled with conflicting definitions, was broadly characterized by brevity, precision, purity of texture and concentration of meaning: as Pound stated, it should ‘use no superfluous word, no adjective, which does not reveal something … it does not use images as ornaments. The image itself is the speech’. It was this freshness and directness of approach which means that, as Peter Jones says in his invaluable Introduction, ‘imagistic ideas still lie at the centre of our poetic practice’.

The Mysteries of Udolpho: A Romance

by Ann Radcliffe Jacqueline Howard

This was the most popular novel of Radcliffe's time and Radcliffe's portrayal of her heroine's inner life raised the Gothic romance to a new level. The atmosphere of fear and the gripping plot continue to thrill today. This is the story of the orphaned Emily St Aubert who finds herself separated from the man she loves and confined within the Castle of Udolpho by her aunt's new husband, Montoni. Here she must cope with an unwanted suitor, Montoni's threats, and the wild imaginings and terrors which threaten to overwhelm her.

The Mystery of Edwin Drood: And Some Uncollected Pieces (New Oxford Illustrated Dickens Ser. #Vol. 16)

by Charles Dickens David Paroissien

Penguin Classics e-books give you the best possible editions of Charles Dickens's novels, including all the original illustrations, useful and informative introductions, the definitive, accurate text as it was meant to be published, a chronology of Dickens's life and notes that fill in the background to the book. This Penguin Classics edition of The Mystery of Edwin Drood also includes the mysterious 'Sapsea Fragment' and Dickens's plans for the story. The Mystery of Edwin Drood, Dickens' last novel, is a mystery built around a presumed crime - the murder of a nephew by his uncle. Dickens died before completing the story, leaving the mystery unsolved and encouraging successive generations of readers to turn detective. Beyond the preoccupying fact of this intriguing crime, however, the novel also offers readers a characteristically Dickensian mix of the fantastical world of the imagination and a vibrantly journalistic depiction of gritty reality.

The Old Curiosity Shop: The\old Curiosity Shop

by Charles Dickens Norman Page Samuel Williams Daniel Maclise George Cattermole Hablot K. Browne

Penguin Classics e-books give you the best possible editions of Charles Dickens's novels, including all the original illustrations, useful and informative introductions, the definitive, accurate text as it was meant to be published, a chronology of Dickens's life and notes that fill in the background to the book. The Old Curiosity Shop and the tale of Little Nell gripped the nation when it first appeared in 1841. Described as a 'tragedy of sorrows', it shows Nell uprooted from a secure and innocent childhood and cast into a world where evil takes many shapes, the most fascinating of which is the stunted, lecherous and demonic Quilp. Blending realism with non-realistic genres such as fairy-tale, allegory and pastoral, The Old Curiosity Shop contains some of Dickens most memorable comic and grotesque creations, including the dwarf Daniel Quilp, Dick Swiveller and Kit Nubbles.

The Sign of Four: Second Of The Four Sherlock Holmes Novels (Mobi Classics Series)

by Peter Ackroyd Arthur Conan Doyle Ed Glinert

As a dense yellow fog swirls through the streets of London, a deep melancholy has descended on Sherlock Holmes, who sits in a cocaine-induced haze at 221B Baker Street. His mood is only lifted by a visit from a beautiful but distressed young woman - Mary Morstan, whose father vanished ten years before. Four years later she began to receive an exquisite gift every year: a large, lustrous pearl. Now she has had an intriguing invitation to meet her unknown benefactor and urges Holmes and Watson to accompany her. And in the ensuing investigation - which involves a wronged woman, a stolen hoard of Indian treasure, a wooden-legged ruffian, a helpful dog and a love affair - even the jaded Holmes is moved to exclaim, 'Isn't it gorgeous!'

The American Weird: Concept and Medium

by Julius Greve and Florian Zappe

Hitherto classified as a form of genre fiction, or as a particular aesthetic quality of literature by H. P. Lovecraft, the weird has now come to refer to a broad spectrum of artistic practices and expressions including fiction, film, television, photography, music, and visual and performance art. Largely under-theorized so far, The American Weird brings together perspectives from literary, cultural, media and film studies, and from philosophy, to provide a thorough exploration of the weird mode. Separated into two sections – the first exploring the concept of the weird and the second how it is applied through various media – this book generates new approaches to fundamental questions: Can the weird be conceptualized as a generic category, as an aesthetic mode or as an epistemological position? May the weird be thought through in similar ways to what Sianne Ngai calls the zany, the cute, and the interesting? What are the transformations it has undergone aesthetically and politically since its inception in the early twentieth century? Which strands of contemporary critical theory and philosophy have engaged in a dialogue with the discourses of and on the weird? And what is specifically “American” about this aesthetic mode?As the first comprehensive, interdisciplinary study of the weird, this book not only explores the writings of Lovecraft, Caitlín Kiernan, China Miéville, and Jeff VanderMeer, but also the graphic novels of Alan Moore, the music of Captain Beefheart, the television show Twin Peaks and the films of Lily Amirpour, Matthew Barney, David Lynch, and Jordan Peele.

Animals and Their Children in Victorian Culture (Perspectives on the Non-Human in Literature and Culture)

by Brenda Ayres Sarah Elizabeth Maier

Whether a secularized morality, biblical worldview, or unstated set of mores, the Victorian period can and always will be distinguished from those before and after for its pervasive sense of the "proper way" of thinking, speaking, doing, and acting. Animals in literature taught Victorian children how to be behave. If you are a postmodern posthumanist, you might argue, "But the animals in literature did not write their own accounts." Animal characters may be the creations of writers’ imagination, but animals did and do exist in their own right, as did and do humans. The original essays in Animals and Their Children in Victorian explore the representation of animals in children’s literature by resisting an anthropomorphized perception of them. Instead of focusing on the domestication of animals, this book analyzes how animals in literature "civilize" children, teaching them how to get along with fellow creatures—both human and nonhuman.

Animals and Their Children in Victorian Culture (Perspectives on the Non-Human in Literature and Culture)

by Brenda Ayres Sarah Elizabeth Maier

Whether a secularized morality, biblical worldview, or unstated set of mores, the Victorian period can and always will be distinguished from those before and after for its pervasive sense of the "proper way" of thinking, speaking, doing, and acting. Animals in literature taught Victorian children how to be behave. If you are a postmodern posthumanist, you might argue, "But the animals in literature did not write their own accounts." Animal characters may be the creations of writers’ imagination, but animals did and do exist in their own right, as did and do humans. The original essays in Animals and Their Children in Victorian explore the representation of animals in children’s literature by resisting an anthropomorphized perception of them. Instead of focusing on the domestication of animals, this book analyzes how animals in literature "civilize" children, teaching them how to get along with fellow creatures—both human and nonhuman.

Architecture and ekphrasis: Space, time and the embodied description of the past (Rethinking Art's Histories)

by Dana Arnold

Architecture and ekphrasis examines how eighteenth-century prints and drawings of antique architecture operated as representations of thought. Using original archival material, it considers the idea of the past in the period, specifically how it was discovered and described, and investigates how space and time inform visual ekphrasis or descriptions of architecture. The idea of embodiment is used to explore the various methods of describing architecture – including graphic techniques, measurement and perspective – all of which demonstrate choices about different modes of ekphrasis. This well-illustrated, accessibly written study will be of interest to academics and students working in a broad range of subject areas. It will also be an essential teaching tool for increasingly popular cross-disciplinary courses.

Architecture and ekphrasis: Space, time and the embodied description of the past (Rethinking Art's Histories)

by Dana Arnold

Architecture and ekphrasis examines how eighteenth-century prints and drawings of antique architecture operated as representations of thought. Using original archival material, it considers the idea of the past in the period, specifically how it was discovered and described, and investigates how space and time inform visual ekphrasis or descriptions of architecture. The idea of embodiment is used to explore the various methods of describing architecture – including graphic techniques, measurement and perspective – all of which demonstrate choices about different modes of ekphrasis. This well-illustrated, accessibly written study will be of interest to academics and students working in a broad range of subject areas. It will also be an essential teaching tool for increasingly popular cross-disciplinary courses.

The Arden Research Handbook of Contemporary Shakespeare Criticism (The Arden Shakespeare Handbooks)

by Evelyn Gajowski

The Arden Research Handbook of Contemporary Shakespeare Criticism is a wide-ranging, authoritative guide to research on critical approaches to Shakespeare by an international team of leading scholars. It contains chapters on 20 specific critical practices, each grounded in analysis of a Shakespeare play. These practices range from foundational approaches including character studies, close reading and genre studies, through those that emerged in the 1970s and 1980s that challenged the preconceptions on which traditional liberal humanism is based, including feminism, cultural materialism and new historicism. Perspectives drawn from postcolonial, queer studies and critical race studies, besides more recent critical practices including presentism, ecofeminism and cognitive ethology all receive detailed treatment.In addition to its coverage of distinct critical approaches, the handbook contains various sections that provide non-specialists with practical help: an A–Z glossary of key terms and concepts, a chronology of major publications and events, an introduction to resources for study of the field and a substantial annotated bibliography.

Arden Shakespeare Third Series Complete Works (The Arden Shakespeare Third Series)

by Richard Proudfoot, Ann Thompson, David Scott Kastan and H.R. Woudhuysen

This new Complete Works marks the completion of the Arden Shakespeare Third Series and includes the complete plays, poems and sonnets, edited by leading international scholars. New to this edition are the 'apocryphal' plays, part-written by Shakespeare: Double Falsehood, Sir Thomas More and King Edward III. The anthology is unique in giving all three extant texts of Hamlet from Shakespeare's time: the first and second Quarto texts of 1603 and 1604-5, and the first Folio text of 1623.With a simple alphabetical arrangement the Complete Works are easy to navigate, and the reader's understanding and enjoyment are enhanced by the general introduction, short individual introductions to each text, a glossary and a bibliography. This handsome volume is ideal for readers keen to explore Shakespeare's work and for anyone building their literary library.

Aria

by Nazanine Hozar

THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER'A sweeping saga about the Iranian revolution as it explodes . . . a Doctor Zhivago of Iran' Margaret Atwood_____________________________________In Iran, 1953, a driver named Behrouz discovers an abandoned baby in an alleyway. When he adopts her, naming her Aria, he has no idea how profoundly this fiery, blue-eyed orphan will shape his future.As she grows, Aria is torn between the three women fated to mother her: the wife of Behrouz, who beats her; the wealthy widow Fereshteh, who offers her refuge but cannot offer her love, and the impoverished Mehri, whose secrets will shatter everything Aria thought she knew about her life.Meanwhile, the winds of change are stirring in Tehran. Rumours are spreading of a passionate religious exile in Paris called Khomeini, who seems to offer a new future for the country. In the midst of this tumult, Aria falls in love with an Armenian boy caught on the wrong side of the revolution. And before long she will be swept up in an uprising which will change the destiny of the land - and its people - forever.___________________________________'A feminist odyssey' John Irving'A beautiful book set against the pains and passions of the Iranian Revolution' Hisham Matar, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Return'Nazanine Hozar's immaculate first novel marks the arrival of a major new voice' Observer

The Bhagavad-gītā: A Critical Introduction

by Ithamar Theodor

This volume is a systematic and comprehensive introduction to one of the most read texts in South Asia, the Bhagavad-gītā. The Bhagavad-gītā is at its core a religious text, a philosophical treatise and a literary work, which has occupied an authoritative position within Hinduism for the past millennium. This book brings together themes central to the study of the Gītā, as it is popularly known – such as the Bhagavad-gītā’s structure, the history of its exegesis, its acceptance by different traditions within Hinduism and its national and global relevance. It highlights the richness of the Gītā’s interpretations, examines its great interpretive flexibility and at the same time offers a conceptual structure based on a traditional commentarial tradition. With contributions from major scholars across the world, this book will be indispensable for scholars and researchers of religious studies, especially Hinduism, Indian philosophy, Asian philosophy, Indian history, literature and South Asian studies.

The Bhagavad-gītā: A Critical Introduction

by Ithamar Theodor

This volume is a systematic and comprehensive introduction to one of the most read texts in South Asia, the Bhagavad-gītā. The Bhagavad-gītā is at its core a religious text, a philosophical treatise and a literary work, which has occupied an authoritative position within Hinduism for the past millennium. This book brings together themes central to the study of the Gītā, as it is popularly known – such as the Bhagavad-gītā’s structure, the history of its exegesis, its acceptance by different traditions within Hinduism and its national and global relevance. It highlights the richness of the Gītā’s interpretations, examines its great interpretive flexibility and at the same time offers a conceptual structure based on a traditional commentarial tradition. With contributions from major scholars across the world, this book will be indispensable for scholars and researchers of religious studies, especially Hinduism, Indian philosophy, Asian philosophy, Indian history, literature and South Asian studies.

The Coffee Bean for Kids: A Simple Lesson to Create Positive Change

by Jon Gordon Damon West

From the bestselling authors of The Coffee Bean, inspire and encourage children with this transformative tale of personal strength The Coffee Bean for Kids tells the inspiring story of Gavin, a young boy with the difficult task of starting school in a new town. Gavin’s teacher, Mrs. Spring, teaches him the story of the carrot, the egg, and the coffee bean. The environments we find ourselves in, like a pot of boiling, hot water, can change, weaken, or harden us, and test who we truly are. We can be like the carrot that weakens in the pot or like the egg that hardens. Or, we can be like the coffee bean and discover the power inside us to transform our environment. Energized by his teacher’s lesson, Gavin embarks on an enlightening journey to transform the world around him. In The Coffee Bean for Kids, authors Jon Gordon and Damon West offer lessons to children to help them: Impact the environment around them Improve their own outlook Become a leader who creates positive change Make new friends Become a positive influence by sharing smiles, kindness, and positive energy Perfect for parents, teachers, and children who wish to overcome negativity and challenging situations, The Coffee Bean for Kids teaches readers about the potential that each one of us has to lead, influence, and make a positive impact on others and the world.

Creating Verbatim Theatre from Oral Histories (Practicing Oral History)

by Clare Summerskill

Offering a roadmap for practicing verbatim theatre (plays created from oral histories), this book outlines theatre processes through the lens of oral history and draws upon oral history scholarship to bring best practices from that discipline to theatre practitioners. This book opens with an overview of oral history and verbatim theatre, considering the ways in which existing oral history debates can inform verbatim theatre processes and highlights necessary ethical considerations within each field, which are especially prevalent when working with narrators from marginalised communities. It provides a step-by-step guide to creating plays from interviews and contains practical guidance for determining the scope of a theatre project: identifying narrators and conducting interviews, developing a script from excerpts of interview transcripts and outlining a variety of ways to create verbatim theatre productions. By bringing together this explicit discussion of oral history in relationship to theatre based on personal testimonies, the reader gains insight into each field and the close relationship between the two. Supported by international case studies that cover a wide range of working methods and productions, including The Laramie Project and Parramatta Girls, this is the perfect guide for oral historians producing dramatic representations of the material they have sourced through interviews, and for writers creating professional theatre productions, community projects or student plays.

Creating Verbatim Theatre from Oral Histories (Practicing Oral History)

by Clare Summerskill

Offering a roadmap for practicing verbatim theatre (plays created from oral histories), this book outlines theatre processes through the lens of oral history and draws upon oral history scholarship to bring best practices from that discipline to theatre practitioners. This book opens with an overview of oral history and verbatim theatre, considering the ways in which existing oral history debates can inform verbatim theatre processes and highlights necessary ethical considerations within each field, which are especially prevalent when working with narrators from marginalised communities. It provides a step-by-step guide to creating plays from interviews and contains practical guidance for determining the scope of a theatre project: identifying narrators and conducting interviews, developing a script from excerpts of interview transcripts and outlining a variety of ways to create verbatim theatre productions. By bringing together this explicit discussion of oral history in relationship to theatre based on personal testimonies, the reader gains insight into each field and the close relationship between the two. Supported by international case studies that cover a wide range of working methods and productions, including The Laramie Project and Parramatta Girls, this is the perfect guide for oral historians producing dramatic representations of the material they have sourced through interviews, and for writers creating professional theatre productions, community projects or student plays.

Crush (Crave #2)

by Tracy Wolff

Trust no one.Danger, romance and excitement await in the unputdownable and addictive sequel to Crave, by New York Times bestselling author Tracy Wolff.When she arrived at Katmere Academy, mortal Grace's world turned upside down. Now back at the school, she is haunted by fragments of days she doesn't remember living, as she struggles to understand who, or what, she really is.Finally reunited with Jaxon, Grace begins to feel safe again - until Jaxon's brother, Hudson, reappears with a vengeance. He insists there are secrets Grace doesn't know, threatening to drive a wedge between her and Jaxon forever.But there are far worse enemies at their doorstep - and the only thing Hudson and Jaxon can agree on is that leaving Katmere would mean Grace's certain death. Unless they can defeat an unspeakable evil, everyone's lives are at risk. But winning will require a sacrifice. And it could be more than they can give.***Praise for the Crave series:'Fandom's new favorite vampire romance obsession' Hypable'Throw in some deadly intrigue to mingle with the dark secret Jaxon bears, and you've got a recipe for YA vampire success' Bustle'Wolff has a masterpiece on her hands. It's as simple as that' Vocal.Media'Wolff exquisitely delivers girl power, romance, and a swoon-worthy hero' Lynn Rush'An addictive masterpiece!' Emily McKay, national bestselling author of Storybound

The Duchess of Malfi (New Mermaids)

by John Webster

This fully re-edited, modernised play text is accompanied by insightful commentary notes, while its lively introduction provides an essential contextual grounding in the court scandals, anti-Catholic sentiment and Senecan drama that formed a backdrop to Webster's tragedy. Exploring the challenges of staging this highly melodramatic play, Karen Britland guides you through the most interesting points of its rich performance history, and analyses recent productions such as Dominic Dromgoole's version at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, starring Gemma Arterton. Analysing its masterful poetry, she shows how the work can be harnessed to engage in contemporary social debates about privacy, torture, surveillance, and personal freedom, and empowers you to do likewise.Supplemented by a plot summary, annotated bibliography and a companion website providing thought-provoking podcasts, production images, useful web links and sample questions and essay ideas, this edition is the most enlightening and engaging you will find.

The Girl Who Lost the Light in Her Eyes: A Storybook to Support Children and Young People Who Experience Loss (Supporting Children and Young People Who Experience Loss)

by Juliette Ttofa

This beautifully illustrated and sensitively written storybook has been created to be used therapeutically with children experiencing loss. Telling the story of a young girl who searches high and low for the light that is missing from her eyes, it encourages the child to move through the grieving process in order to find colour in the world again. The colourful illustrations and engaging story are designed to inspire conversation around loss, and will help develop emotional literacy and resilience in children and young people. This book is also available to purchase alongside a pocket guidebook as part of the two-component set, Supporting Children and Young People Who Experience Loss. The full set includes: • The Girl Who Lost the Light in Her Eyes, a colourfully illustrated and sensitively written storybook, designed to encourage conversation and support emotional literacy. • Using the Expressive Arts with Children and Young People Who Experience Loss, a supporting guidebook that explores a relational approach and promotes creative expression as a way through loss or bereavement. Perfectly crafted to spark communication around a difficult topic, this is an invaluable tool for practitioners, educators, parents, and anybody else looking to support a child or young person through loss or bereavement.

The Girl Who Lost the Light in Her Eyes: A Storybook to Support Children and Young People Who Experience Loss (Supporting Children and Young People Who Experience Loss)

by Juliette Ttofa

This beautifully illustrated and sensitively written storybook has been created to be used therapeutically with children experiencing loss. Telling the story of a young girl who searches high and low for the light that is missing from her eyes, it encourages the child to move through the grieving process in order to find colour in the world again. The colourful illustrations and engaging story are designed to inspire conversation around loss, and will help develop emotional literacy and resilience in children and young people. This book is also available to purchase alongside a pocket guidebook as part of the two-component set, Supporting Children and Young People Who Experience Loss. The full set includes: • The Girl Who Lost the Light in Her Eyes, a colourfully illustrated and sensitively written storybook, designed to encourage conversation and support emotional literacy. • Using the Expressive Arts with Children and Young People Who Experience Loss, a supporting guidebook that explores a relational approach and promotes creative expression as a way through loss or bereavement. Perfectly crafted to spark communication around a difficult topic, this is an invaluable tool for practitioners, educators, parents, and anybody else looking to support a child or young person through loss or bereavement.

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