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A Pattern of Islands (Ulverscroft Large Print Ser.)

by Arthur Grimble

Arthur Grimble was sent to the Gilbert and Ellice islands as a colonial administrator in the twilight of the Edwardian era. He lived there for the next twenty-five years and developed a rare passion for the language, life and landscape of the place. Fortunately his island neighbours, a fascinating cast of fishermen, sorcerers, poets and fighters, began to trust this charming, happy and energetic young man, and shared with him their treasury of stories from the days when warfare was endemic and magic an essential part of everyday life. A Pattern of Islands is a rich and complex cultural history of the dances and legends, rituals, spells and way of life of the islands. It is also a riproaring adventure story. Grimble learns to spear hungry sharks, to negotiate fearsome reefs and, on one terrifying day, is used as human bait to catch a giant squid.

The Adventures of Louis de Rougemont

by Louis De Rougemont

Louis de Rougemont (1847-1921) was a would-be explorer who claimed to have had adventures in Australasia. "de Rougemont" was born Henri Louis Grin in 1847 in Suchy, Switzerland. <P> <P> In 1898 he began to write about his invented adventures in the British periodical The Wide World Magazine under the name Louis de Rougemont. He described his alleged exploits in search of pearls and gold in New Guinea and claimed to have spent thirty years living with Indigenous Australians in the Australian outback. He claimed that the tribe with whom he had lived had worshipped him as a god. He also claimed to have encountered the Gibson expedition of 1874. Various readers expressed disbelief in his tales from the start, for example, claiming that no one can actually ride a turtle. He had also claimed to have seen flying wombats. The fact that he could not place his travels on the map aroused suspicion. Readers' arguments in the pages of London newspaper, the Daily Chronicle, continued for months.

The Cruise of the Snark

by Jack London

The Cruise of the Snark (1911) is a memoir of Jack and Charmian London''s 1907-1909 voyage across the Pacific. His descriptions of surf-riding, which he dubbed a royal sport, helped introduce it to and popularize it with the mainland. London writes: Through the white crest of a breaker suddenly appears a dark figure, erect, a man-fish or a sea-god, on the very forward face of the crest where the top falls over and down, driving in toward shore, buried to his loins in smoking spray, caught up by the sea and flung landward, bodily, a quarter of a mile. It is a Kanaka on a surf-board. And I know that when I have finished these lines I shall be out in that riot of colour and pounding surf, trying to bit those breakers even as he, and failing as he never failed, but living life as the best of us may live it. . from Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Intuitive navigation. . Text annotation and mark-up. .

A First Year in Canterbury Settlement

by Samuel Butler

A First Year in Canterbury Settlement, the earliest book by Butler, is a beautifully narrated tale of a colonial settler. <P> <P> Through journal of the author as a young emigrant, we get a first-hand account of his sea voyage to New Zealand. The vibrant descriptions of flora and fauna of the new land show his keen interest in everything, from exploration of the terrain to sheep-farming. Informative!

A Narrative of the Expedition to Botany-Bay

by Watkin Tench

N/A

Two Expeditions into the Interior of Southern Australia

by Charles Sturt

Two expeditions into the interior of Southern Australia during the years 1828-1831, with observations on the soil, climate and resources of New South Wales.

We Of The Never Never (Classic Ser.)

by Aeneas Gunn

Newly married, Jeannie Gunn accompanies her husband to 'The Elsey', the huge cattle station in the Northern Territory, several hundred miles from the nearest town. She is one of the few white women in the area and her presence is at first resented by the stockmen until her warmth and spirit win their affection and respect. This is one of the few autobiographies written by a woman to chronicle the life of the pioneers of the outback. In the style of the bush storyteller, Mrs Gunn conveys with moving simplicity the beauty and cruelty of the land, and the isolation and loneliness, comradeship and kindness of the early settlers.

Inventing Australia: Images And Identity, 1688-1980 (Australian Experience Ser. #No. 3)

by Richard White

'White sets himself a most ambitious task, and he goes remarkably far to achieving his goals. Very few books tell so much about Australia, with elegance and concision, as does his' - Professor Michael Roe'Stimulating and informative. an antidote to the cultural cringe' - Canberra Times'To be Australian': what can that mean? Inventing Australia sets out to find the answers by tracing the images we have used to describe our land and our people - the convict hell, the workingman's paradise, the Bush legend, the 'typical' Australian from the shearer to the Bondi lifesaver, the land of opportunity, the small rich industrial country, the multicultural society.The book argues that these images, rather than describing an especially Australian reality, grow out of assumptions about nature, race, class, democracy, sex and empire, and are 'invented' to serve the interests of particular groups.There have been many books about Australia's national identity; this is the first to place the discussion within an historical context to explain how Australians' views of themselves change and why these views change in the way they do.

Inventing Australia

by Richard White

'White sets himself a most ambitious task, and he goes remarkably far to achieving his goals. Very few books tell so much about Australia, with elegance and concision, as does his' - Professor Michael Roe'Stimulating and informative. an antidote to the cultural cringe' - Canberra Times'To be Australian': what can that mean? Inventing Australia sets out to find the answers by tracing the images we have used to describe our land and our people - the convict hell, the workingman's paradise, the Bush legend, the 'typical' Australian from the shearer to the Bondi lifesaver, the land of opportunity, the small rich industrial country, the multicultural society.The book argues that these images, rather than describing an especially Australian reality, grow out of assumptions about nature, race, class, democracy, sex and empire, and are 'invented' to serve the interests of particular groups.There have been many books about Australia's national identity; this is the first to place the discussion within an historical context to explain how Australians' views of themselves change and why these views change in the way they do.

An Institutionalist Guide to Economics and Public Policy

by Marc R. Tool

This narrative recounts the 18th and 19th century "shipping out" of Pacific islanders aboard European and American vessels, a kind of "counter-exploring", that echoed the ancient voyages of settlement of their island ancestors.

An Institutionalist Guide to Economics and Public Policy

by Marc R. Tool

This narrative recounts the 18th and 19th century "shipping out" of Pacific islanders aboard European and American vessels, a kind of "counter-exploring", that echoed the ancient voyages of settlement of their island ancestors.

Other Passports: Poems 1958-1985 (Picador Bks.)

by Clive James

Clive James's unforgettable poetry collection, which gained him comparison to Byron and status as a 'true poet' demonstrates his wide range of interests and knowledge while never compromising his trademark wit and humour. Other Passports explores his lyrical style of poetry, alongside parodies, imitations and lampoons.

The Fatal Shore: The Epic Of Australia's Founding (Harvill Panther Ser.)

by Robert Hughes

An award-winning epic on the birth of AustraliaIn 1787, the twenty-eighth year of the reign of King George III, the British Government sent a fleet to colonise Australia.Documenting the brutal transportation of men, women and children out of Georgian Britain into a horrific penal system which was to be the precursor to the Gulag and was the origin of Australia, The Fatal Shore is the definitive, masterfully written narrative that has given its true history to Australia.'A unique phantasmagoria of crime and punishment, which combines the shadowy terrors of Goya with the tumescent life of Dickens' Times

The Petrov Affair: Politics and Espionage

by Robert Manne

The Petrov Affair: Politics and Espionage is a memoir of the Petrov Affair, a historical event that involves the defection of Vladimir Petrov, a colonel in the Soviet intelligence service in Sydney, and the announcement of his defection ten days later by Australian Prime Minister Robert Menzies. With information gathered from different reliable sources, the book details in chronological order the Petrov's defection - the events that occurred before and the factors that led to it; its announcement; and the implications of this event for politics and espionage. The text also explains how the affair affected the Australian people and the world; the conclusion of this event; and the events that happened after it. The book is recommended for historians and history enthusiasts who would want to know more about this particular event. The text is also recommended for experts who delve in the Cold War and the Soviet Union.

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