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Showing 1 through 25 of 2,719 results

Συρανό δε Μπερζεράκ

by Edmond Rostand

This is the famous 19th-century play about a great swordsman and poet with the unseemly large nose. Although he is feared by opponents, he cannot court the woman of his dreams, except through anonymously sent poems, which makes for a romantic and adventurous tale.

The 14th Tale (Oberon Modern Plays Ser.)

by Inua Ellams

'The 14th Tale is a beautiful mellifluous narrative that tells the hilarious exploits of a natural born mischief, growing from the clay streets of Nigeria to rooftops in Dublin and finally to London.

17 (Oberon Modern Plays Ser.)

by Dameon Garnett

Let’s celebrate, right now, shall we? The cake’s ruined, but we’ve got the ashes. 17 candles on the ashes of my fucking life...' At seventeen years old, Scott is facing a future that is as uncertain as his past. The death of his adopted mother throws his life into chaos, and now he finds himself having to fit in with a new aspirational family, and the birth-mother he never knew. Class differences soon reach fever pitch, and guilt has the winning hand. Whoever thought change would be this difficult, and what is Scott hiding under the bed?

1984 (Oberon Modern Plays Ser.)

by George Orwell Duncan Macmillan Robert Icke

April, 1984. Winston Smith, thinks a thought, starts a diary, and falls in love. But Big Brother is watching him, and the door to Room 101 can swing open in the blink of an eye. Its ideas have become our ideas, and Orwells fiction is often said to be our reality. The definitive book of the 20th century is re-examined in a radical new adaptation exploring why Orwells vision of the future is as relevant as ever.

2401 Objects

by Hannah Barker Lewis Hetherington Liam Jarvis

2011 Fringe First Award Winner‘Henry, are you awake?’Henry lives each day like the last. Exactly like the last. Every day, he tries to make sense of the world around him; the girl sitting on the lawn outside his window, the pages of a book filled with the same sentence, the 80 year old man looking at him in the mirror.In 2009 Patient H.M.’s brain is dissected live on the internet to a global audience of 400,000 people, cut into carefully preserved slices: manuscripts of tissue like the pages of a book.In 1953 Henry Molaison emerges from experimental brain surgery without any recollection of the last two years of his life or the ability to form new memories.In 1935 nine-year old Henry is knocked over by a bike, leaving him unconscious for five minutes.Following Analogue's critically acclaimed Mile End and Beachy Head and inspired by the world’s most important neuroscientific case-study, 2401 Objects tells the remarkable story of a man who could no longer remember, but who has proven impossible to forget.‘I defy anyone not be drawn into this deeply moving examination of life, death and memory.’ - Telegraph‘2401 Objects is a solid, well-researched piece of theatre that adds to Analogue's ever-growing canon of work.’ - Total Theatre Review‘Beautifully-sculpted... an understated and outstandingly gentle piece of theatre’ -The Scotsman

27

by Abi Morgan

Dr Richard Garfield has given Ursula a difficult choice. She is the Mother Superior in waiting of a convent that has been given the opportunity to take part in his revolutionary scientific study. This American study would require that the nuns donate their brains after death to potentially unlock the mysteries of Alzheimer’s and dementia. Ursula must weigh up the value of preserving her faith, versus embracing science. The study is agreed and Richard and his team come to the convent every year to test the nuns who are willing to take part. This union will change their lives forever. For Ursula, with the impending pressure of taking over the ailing convent, the study brings more challenges than she could ever have imagined and rocks her faith and her hitherto cloistered existence to its core. Drawing on research contained within the book and study Aging with Grace, 27 is an extraordinary examination of a lifestyle in decline, but it could hold the key to the issues of our times – our ageing population and the decline of our minds.‘An important play about the ageing mind, faith and science.’ – Vicky Featherstone, Artistic Director, National Theatre of Scotland‘A fearless study of doubt, loss and belief... spellbindingly good.’ – The Herald‘It's a masterful piece of new theatre, dense with ideas, jumping with funny lines.’ – Independent

The 306: Dawn

by Oliver Emanuel

‘I don’t believe in heroes and cowards. Not in war. It’s only my opinion but I’ve been in it since the beginning.’ The 306: Dawn is a new piece of music theatre from the National Theatre of Scotland as part of 14-18 NOW, the UK’s arts programme for the First World War centenary. Based on real events, it charts the journey of three of the British soldiers who were executed for cowardice, desertion and mutiny during World War I (1914-18). Joseph Byers is too young to enlist but like so many at the time, lies about his age to join the other men at the front. However, his dreams of being a soldier are quickly destroyed by the brutal realities of trench warfare. Lance-Sergeant Willie Stones used his rifle to block the entrance to a trench during fierce fighting. Now Willie stands accused of casting away his arms in combat – an offence punishable by death. He thought he was protecting his men, but the top brass want to make an example of him to maintain discipline in the ranks. And Harry Farr is traumatised by the things he has seen at the Battle of the Somme. He has subsequently been convicted of cowardice and, as he waits to hear his fate, he dreams of his wife and hopes for a last minute reprieve. With a contemporary score performed live by the Red Note Ensemble, the play explores the vulnerability and devastation of the battlefields and the inner struggles of the men.

The 306: Day

by Oliver Emanuel

1917. The war across the channel rages on. In Russia, a revolution is turning the social order on its head. And at home in Britain, there are women fighting their own battle. Rents are rising. Food is scarce. And war work can be deadly. Inspired by real events and first-hand accounts, The 306: Day follows the lives of three ordinary women fighting to be heard above the clamour of World War 1.

31 Hours (Oberon Modern Plays)

by Kieran Knowles

Every 31 hours someone takes their own life by jumping in front of a train. They are ten times more likely to be male. 31 Hours is the story of four men who clean up after rail suicides. It is a story of four men at work. Four men at home. Four men dealing with their own lives. Their own problems. Dealing with them in their own way. On their own. Silently. It is a story of four men failing to talk. Filled with humour and humanity, it is a high-speed kaleidoscopic journey through masculinity, mental health and messy aftermaths in modern Britain.

39 Microlectures: In Proximity of Performance

by Matthew Goulish

'A series of accidents has brought you this book. You may think of it not as a book, but as a library, an elevator, an amateur performance in a nearby theatre. Open it to the table of contents. Turn to the page that sounds the most interesting to you. Read a sentence or two. Repeat the process. Read this book as a creative act, and feel encouraged.' 39 Microlectures: In Proximity of Performance is a collection of miniature stories, parables, musings and thinkpieces on the nature of reading, writing, art, collaboration, performance, life, death, the universe and everything. It is a unique and moving document for our times, full of curiosity and wonder, thoughtfulness and pain. Matthew Goulish, founder member of performance group Goat Island, meditates on these and other diverse themes, proving, along the way, that the boundaries between poetry and criticism, and between creativity and theory, are a lot less fixed than they may seem. The book is revelatory, solemn yet at times hilarious, and genuinely written to inspire - or perhaps provoke - creativity and thought.

39 Microlectures: In Proximity of Performance

by Matthew Goulish

'A series of accidents has brought you this book. You may think of it not as a book, but as a library, an elevator, an amateur performance in a nearby theatre. Open it to the table of contents. Turn to the page that sounds the most interesting to you. Read a sentence or two. Repeat the process. Read this book as a creative act, and feel encouraged.' 39 Microlectures: In Proximity of Performance is a collection of miniature stories, parables, musings and thinkpieces on the nature of reading, writing, art, collaboration, performance, life, death, the universe and everything. It is a unique and moving document for our times, full of curiosity and wonder, thoughtfulness and pain. Matthew Goulish, founder member of performance group Goat Island, meditates on these and other diverse themes, proving, along the way, that the boundaries between poetry and criticism, and between creativity and theory, are a lot less fixed than they may seem. The book is revelatory, solemn yet at times hilarious, and genuinely written to inspire - or perhaps provoke - creativity and thought.

4.48 Psychosis (PDF)

by Sarah Kane Ken Urban

4. 48 Psychosis sees the ultimate narrowing of Sarah Kane's focus in her work. The struggle of the self to remain intact has moved in her work from civil war, into the family, into the couple, into the individual, and finally into the theatre of phychosis: the mind itself. This play was written in 1999 shortly before the playwright took her own life at age 28. On the page, the piece looks like a poem. No characters are named, and even their number is unspecified. It could be a journey through one person's mind, or an interview between a doctor and his patient.

The 40 Minute Tempest / King Ram (Plays for Young People)

by William Shakespeare Lesley Ross

The 40 Minute Tempest recreates the world of Shakespeare's great play as told by Prospero and Ariel as they journey towards Prospero's retirement and Ariel's freedom. Using puppetry, the modern idiom and Shakespeare's verse it magically brings to life the world of Prospero's island.King Ram, based on King Lear, is the story of an old king with a foolish plan to split his lands between his two daughters, and of a ten year old boy's desperate search for a baby's father. Songs and verse create a roller-coaster dramatic ride for children.

4000 Miles: Two Plays

by Amy Herzog

It's the middle of the night when 21-year-old Leo arrives on the doorstep of the West Village apartment where his feisty 91-year-old grandmother Vera lives. She's an old Communist who lives alone, he's a latter-day hippie, recently returned from a cross-country bike trip which ended traumatically. Over the course of a single month, these unlikely roommates infuriate, bewilder, and ultimately connect. When Leo's old girlfriend shows up and he begins to reveal the mysterious events of his journey, Leo and Vera discover the narrow line between growing up and growing old.Peopled with nuanced, beautifully-drawn characters, Amy Herzog's award-winning play has established her as a remarkable new talent. 4000 Miles had its 2011 world première at New York's Lincoln Center Theater.

5 Guys Chillin'

by Peter Darney

‘Wanna pair of shorts? Shot of G? Line of Meph?’ From surgeons to students, couples to kink; guys that love it and lost guys longing to be loved. An original look into a drugfuelled, hedonistic, highly secret world of Chem-Sex, Grindr and instant gratification. Created from five people’s interviews and informed by over fifty hours of material from guys found through Grindr and other social media, this is an important look at the relatively new scene that apps have been fundamental in creating. With HIV rates in London soaring and these parties being held in part to blame, 5 Guys Chillin’ looks at changing attitudes to sex, to HIV, to how we achieve intimacy and our perception of what sexual relations can and should be. Winner of the Doric Wilson Intercultural Dialogue Award and Best Actor award (Elliot Hadley) at Dublin International Gay Theatre Festival 2016 Radio Reverb Out In Brighton LGBTQ Award 2016

The 56 & E15

by Lung Lung

The 56 ‘Nobody dies in football matches in fires. It doesn’t happen.’ At 3.40pm on 11th May 1985, a small fire broke out in the main stand at Valley Parade football ground during the last game of the season. Within four minutes, the wooden structure was ablaze. Adapted solely from over sixty real-life testimonies, this pertinent piece of documentary theatre pays homage to the supporters who lost their lives in one of the darkest days in British footballing history. The 56 examines the solidarity, strength and community in the face of overwhelming tragedy. E15 ‘We want social housing, not social cleansing.’br> Facing skyrocketing rent and forced relocation out of London, twenty-nine single mothers united to confront Newham Council’s gentrification of their hometown. From the streets of Newham to the Houses of Parliament, this bold piece of documentary theatre is adapted from the real-life testimonies of the most under-represented and prominent voices on the political spectrum – providing a truthful retelling of the Focus E15 Campaign, Britain’s housing crisis and how one group of women refused to be marginalized. This is the beginning of the end of the housing crisis.

946: The Amazing Story of Adolphus Tips

by Michael Morpurgo Emma Rice

Imagine being told to leave your home… Imagine American soldiers occupying your house and land… Imagine being twelve and angry, with only a cat to tell your secrets to… Well it all happened (most of it anyway) in Slapton Sands, Devon, in 1944. Based on Michael Morpurgo’s novel The Amazing Story of Adolphus Tips, 946 explodes everything we thought we knew about the D-Day landings, using music, puppetry and foolishness to tell this tale of war, prejudice and love. Tender, political and surprisingly romantic, this story speaks to us all and finally reveals the secrets the US and British governments tried to keep quiet.

A2 Drama and Theatre Studies: The Essential Introduction for Edexcel

by Alan Perks Jacqueline Porteous

A2 Drama and Theatre Studies: The Essential Introduction for Edexcel builds on the skills developed during the AS year to provide clear and informative guidance to Units 3 and 4 of the specification. The textbook provides further information on rehearsing, performing, directing and textual analysis, together with new material on deconstructing a script, devising theatre and preparing for the final examination. Features of the text include: overviews of specification and assessment requirements written and practical exercises a glossary of useful words and terms in-depth analysis of the three key plays – Dr Faustus, Lysistrata and Woyzeck extension exercises to stretch the more able student worked examples to illustrate best practice sources for further study advice on study after A Level. Written by a chief examiner and a principal moderator, this book and its companion volume for AS Level offer informed and supportive exercises to ensure that students reach their maximum potential in achieving A Level success.

A2 Drama and Theatre Studies: The Essential Introduction for Edexcel

by Alan Perks Jacqueline Porteous

A2 Drama and Theatre Studies: The Essential Introduction for Edexcel builds on the skills developed during the AS year to provide clear and informative guidance to Units 3 and 4 of the specification. The textbook provides further information on rehearsing, performing, directing and textual analysis, together with new material on deconstructing a script, devising theatre and preparing for the final examination. Features of the text include: overviews of specification and assessment requirements written and practical exercises a glossary of useful words and terms in-depth analysis of the three key plays – Dr Faustus, Lysistrata and Woyzeck extension exercises to stretch the more able student worked examples to illustrate best practice sources for further study advice on study after A Level. Written by a chief examiner and a principal moderator, this book and its companion volume for AS Level offer informed and supportive exercises to ensure that students reach their maximum potential in achieving A Level success.

Abi Morgan: Plays One

by Abi Morgan

'Tiny Dynamite: An impossible love story is given a second chance and three scorched characters are about to learn that lightning does strike twice. Splendour: Inside a beautiful state residence on the edge of a city, four women wait. They talk: films, Prada, chilli vodka, anything. Outside civil war looms ever nearer. Tender: In a city of fast talk and chance encounters, how much faith can we put in other people? Abi Morgan’s acerbic play takes a scalpel to modern love and friendship. Lovesong: The story of one couple, told from two different points in their lives – as young lovers in their twenties and as worldly companions looking back on their relationship. 27: Dr Richard Garfield has given Ursula a difficult choice. She is the Mother Superior in waiting of a convent that has been given the opportunity to take part in his revolutionary scientific study. Ursula must weigh up the value of preserving her faith, versus embracing science.

Abi Morgan Two Plays: Splendour/Tender

by Abi Morgan

Inside a beautiful state residence on the edge of an Eastern European city, four women wait. They talk – movies, handbags, vodka, anything. For outside, as snow is falling, civil war looms ever nearer. A play about decadence, desire and dictatorship, Splendour brilliantly peels back the cruel veneer of our lives to reveal the beating heart within. Tender takes place in a city full of chance encounters. Al loves Hen, but now there’s a baby on the way everything looks different. Gloria loves Marvin, but one day he walked out and disappeared. And Hen’s mate Tash just loves a laugh and a drink. Particularly a drink. In this world of fast talk and hard sell, how much faith can we put in other people? Splendour was first produced by Paines Plough and won the Barclays TMA Award for Best New Play. Tender was first produced by Birmingham Rep, in a co-production with Hampstead Theatre and Theatre Royal Plymouth.

Abigail's Party

by Mike Leigh

40th anniversary edition with a new introduction by Mike Leigh. Forty years on from its first performance at the Hampstead Theatre and original screening on BBC1 soon after, Mike Leigh's Abigail's Party - telling of two marriages spectacularly unravelling at an awkward neighbourhood drinks party - remains a pinnacle of British theatre.Here is the original script, complete with a new introduction by Mike Leigh describing the play's unlikely genesis, how it came to be made and where he believes it fits within his oeuvre as one of the country's leading writers and directors.'The play came from my intuitive sense of the spirit and the flavour of the times, and from a growing personal fear of, and frustration with the suburban existence' Mike Leigh, from his new introduction'Leigh's play isn't simply about marriage and Essex, but also about the unhappy state of the realm' Guardian

Abigail's Party & Goose-Pimples

by Mike Leigh

Mike Leigh’s 1970s classic play ‘Abigail’s Party’ focuses on an evening of domestic hell in the guise of a suburban drinks soirée. While teenager Abigail parties a few doors away, the pretentious Beverly and her estate agent husband, Laurence, entertain their neighbours – Abigail’s mother, Susan, ex-footballer, Tony, and his wife, Angela. But as the alcohol flows, tensions in the hosts’ barely functional marriage emerge and their obsessions, prejudices and petty competitiveness are ruthlessly, and hilariously, exposed. ‘Goose-Pimples’, meanwhile, is easily as sharp and uncompromising. This time, the action focuses on ambitious casino croupier, Jackie, and Saudi businessman, Muhammad, who meet – and misunderstand – one another spectacularly.

Ablutions

by Patrick DeWitt Fellswoop Theatre

Picture yourself as a bartender, sipping top-shelf whisky and watching your customers descend into nightly oblivion. Your heart is broken by the world around you and, leaving the whisky aside, you hatch a devious, unthinkable plan of escape… Award-winning FellSwoop Theatre present Ablutions: a dark, modern drama, adapted from the novel by Man Booker shortlisted author, Patrick deWitt. A grimly funny tale from the sodden depths of the Los Angeles underworld, Ablutions blends a live soundtrack and deWitt’s heart-wrenching humour. WINNER: Ignite Theatre Festival’s Critics’ Choice Award

Absolute Hell

by Rodney Ackland

Set in a Soho drinking Club just after World War II, this savage, witty slice of Bohemian life in London was reviled by one critic as ‘an insult to the British people’. Its title then was The Pink Room, as close as the law would allow for a play in which one of its central characters is a drunken homosexual writer. Despite these obstacles, Absolute Hell is now regarded as a twentieth-century classic, following a sumptuous revival at the National Theatre, starring Dame Judi Dench. Earlier the play had been televised by Channel 4 after being rediscovered by the Orange Tree Theatre, Richmond, near to where the author Rodney Ackland was living in virtual obscurity. The play is remarkable for two reasons: It offers a realistic view of postwar London, in contrast to the nostalgic memories of the blitz and buzz bombs; Ackland’s craft is consummate, weaving together the lives of 20 speaking characters, many of them lost souls as they drift in and out of the bar in search of a more meaningful life. Ackland died in poverty, having written some of the finest plays of our time.

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Showing 1 through 25 of 2,719 results