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كتاب الموسيقى الشرقي

by محمد كامل الخلعي

الموسيقى هو علم يبحث فيه عن أحوال النغم من جهة تأليفه اللذيذ والنافر ـ وعن أحوال الأزمة المتخللة بين النغمات من جهة الطول والقصر. فعلم أنه يتم بجزئين: الأول علم التأليف وهو اللحن ـ والثاني علم الإيقاع وهو المسمى أيضًا بالأصول. (فالنغمات) جمع نغمة بالتحريك وهي (لغة) الصوت الساذج الخالي من الحروف ـ و(اصطلاحًا) الصوت المترنم به. (واللحن) بالسكون (لغة) صوت من الأصوات المصوغة و(اصطلاحًا) ما ركب من نغمات بعضها يعلو أو يسفل عن بعض على نسب معلومة ـ (والنغم للحن كالأحرف للكلام)ـ ثم يرتب ترتيبًا موزونًا ـ أي أنه يصاغ على أحد الأوزان التي سنذكرها بعد. ويقرن بشيء من الشعر أو غيره من سائر الفنون السبعة التي هي ـ القريض ـ والدويت ـ والموالي ـ والموشح ـ والزجل ـ والقومة ـ وكان وكان. وهذا التعريف جامع مانع؛  

3ds Max Modeling for Games: Insider's Guide to Game Character, Vehicle, and Environment Modeling (2nd Edition)

by Andrew Gahan

With 18 years under his belt in the game industry, a key contributor to the MotorStorm series, and the creator of the 3ds Max in Minutes video series (at FocalPress.com), Andrew Gahan delivers the expert techniques in 3ds Max Modeling for Games, 2nd edition. This updated edition is packed with new tutorials that will enhance your modeling skills and pump up your portfolio with high-quality work in no time. Along with Anthony O'Donnell and a team of experts, Gahan covers all of the fundamental game modeling techniques, including character and environment modeling, mapping, and texturing. Finally, a bonus section in 3ds Max Modeling for Games offers readers insights and tips on how to get their careers started in the game industry. New, expanded tutorials take readers of all abilities through full character and environment modeling from beginning to end Companion website (3d-for-games.com) offers a robust, supportive forum where readers can get commentary on new work, develop skills and portfolio art, as well as network with other game artists on a variety of projects. Also features project files for all tutorials in the book and enough support images and photos to keep the budding artist busy for months Completely updated gallery allows the reader to build on various models

Acting for Animators: 4th Edition

by Ed Hooks

Ed Hooks' essential acting guidebook for animators has been fully revised and updated in this 4th edition. Hooks uses classical acting theory – from Aristotle to Stanislavsky and beyond – to explain everything from character analysis and physical movement to facial expression and scene structure. He speaks directly to animators, instead of stage or screen actors. Acting for Animators is an invaluable primer for beginner animators and a useful reference for experienced pros. New to this fourth edition: - 6 new scene-by-scene acting analyses of animated feature films, including Zootopia and The Little Prince - an annotated analysis of Walt Disney’s famous 1935 memo to Don Graham, regarding how best to train animators - advice to the animator about how best to perform visual references - a chapter on Virtual Reality - an online database of Ed’s previous film analyses, all in one place.

Acting for Animators: 4th Edition (PDF)

by Ed Hooks

Ed Hooks' essential acting guidebook for animators has been fully revised and updated in this 4th edition. Hooks uses classical acting theory – from Aristotle to Stanislavsky and beyond – to explain everything from character analysis and physical movement to facial expression and scene structure. He speaks directly to animators, instead of stage or screen actors. Acting for Animators is an invaluable primer for beginner animators and a useful reference for experienced pros. New to this fourth edition: - 6 new scene-by-scene acting analyses of animated feature films, including Zootopia and The Little Prince - an annotated analysis of Walt Disney’s famous 1935 memo to Don Graham, regarding how best to train animators - advice to the animator about how best to perform visual references - a chapter on Virtual Reality - an online database of Ed’s previous film analyses, all in one place.

An Adams fireplace (large print)

by Rnib

This is an image of a fireplace shown from the front. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up. At the top of the image there is the wooden mantelpiece going horizontally from left to right. It is made of four layers, each decreasing in size down the page. Down from this is the horizontal section of the fireplace. It is also made from wood and the central panel has paler decorative woodcarvings stuck on. In the middle is a large goblet with a leaf shape design going to the left and right. These lead to the left and right to a heart shape, a ribbon that curves down and up and a second heart. Down from this to the far left and right are the wooden up-stands of the fireplace. There is an off-centred column on each. These are proud of the tall rectangular back panel. To the right of the left up-stand, to the left of the right up-stand and down from the horizontal section of the fireplace is a thin decorative trim in a paler wood that frames the rest of the fireplace. To the right of the left vertical trim and the left of the right vertical trim are four wall tiles on each side. These would have delicate and intricate ceramic designs and patterns on them, which are not shown. At the bottom centre of the image is the grate pan holding back the ashes of the fire. In the middle is a handle to withdraw the pan. Up from this is the grate griddle holding back the coals of the fire. Up the page is the space where the fire would burn, and up again is the smoke shoot that directs the smoke up the chimney.

An Adams fireplace (UEB contracted)

by Rnib

This is an image of a fireplace shown from the front. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up. At the top of the image there is the wooden mantelpiece going horizontally from left to right. It is made of four layers, each decreasing in size down the page. Down from this is the horizontal section of the fireplace. It is also made from wood and the central panel has paler decorative woodcarvings stuck on. In the middle is a large goblet with a leaf shape design going to the left and right. These lead to the left and right to a heart shape, a ribbon that curves down and up and a second heart. Down from this to the far left and right are the wooden up-stands of the fireplace. There is an off-centred column on each. These are proud of the tall rectangular back panel. To the right of the left up-stand, to the left of the right up-stand and down from the horizontal section of the fireplace is a thin decorative trim in a paler wood that frames the rest of the fireplace. To the right of the left vertical trim and the left of the right vertical trim are four wall tiles on each side. These would have delicate and intricate ceramic designs and patterns on them, which are not shown. At the bottom centre of the image is the grate pan holding back the ashes of the fire. In the middle is a handle to withdraw the pan. Up from this is the grate griddle holding back the coals of the fire. Up the page is the space where the fire would burn, and up again is the smoke shoot that directs the smoke up the chimney.

An Adams fireplace (UEB uncontracted)

by Rnib

This is an image of a fireplace shown from the front. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left of the page when the image is the correct way up. At the top of the image there is the wooden mantelpiece going horizontally from left to right. It is made of four layers, each decreasing in size down the page. Down from this is the horizontal section of the fireplace. It is also made from wood and the central panel has paler decorative woodcarvings stuck on. In the middle is a large goblet with a leaf shape design going to the left and right. These lead to the left and right to a heart shape, a ribbon that curves down and up and a second heart. Down from this to the far left and right are the wooden up-stands of the fireplace. There is an off-centred column on each. These are proud of the tall rectangular back panel. To the right of the left up-stand, to the left of the right up-stand and down from the horizontal section of the fireplace is a thin decorative trim in a paler wood that frames the rest of the fireplace. To the right of the left vertical trim and the left of the right vertical trim are four wall tiles on each side. These would have delicate and intricate ceramic designs and patterns on them, which are not shown. At the bottom centre of the image is the grate pan holding back the ashes of the fire. In the middle is a handle to withdraw the pan. Up from this is the grate griddle holding back the coals of the fire. Up the page is the space where the fire would burn, and up again is the smoke shoot that directs the smoke up the chimney.

Aesthetic Theory (PDF)

by Theodor W Adorno

Theodor Adorno (1903-69) was undoubtedly the foremost thinker of the Frankfurt School, the influential group of German thinkers that fled to the US in the 1930s, including such thinkers as Herbert Marcuse and Max Horkheimer. His work has proved enormously influential in sociology, philosophy and cultural theory. Aesthetic Theory is Adorno's posthumous magnum opus and the culmination of a lifetime's investigation. Analysing the sublime, the ugly and the beautiful, Adorno shows how such concepts frame and distil human experience and that it is human experience that ultimately underlies aesthetics. In Adorno's formulation 'art is the sedimented history of human misery'.

The Aesthetics of Architecture

by Roger Scruton

Architecture is distinguished from other art forms by its sense of function, its localized quality, its technique, its public and nonpersonal character, and its continuity with the decorative arts. In this important book, Roger Scruton calls for a return to first principles in contemporary architectural theory, contending that the aesthetic of architecture is, in its very essence, an aesthetic of everyday life. Aesthetic understanding is inseparable from a sense of detail and style, from which the appropriate, the expressive, the beautiful, and the proportionate take their meaning. Scruton provides incisive critiques of the romantic, functionalist, and rationalist theories of design, and of the Freudian, Marxist, and semiological approaches to aesthetic value. In a new introduction, Scruton discusses how his ideas have developed since the book's original publication thirty years ago, and he assesses the continuing relevance of his argument for the twenty-first century.

The Aesthetics of Development: Art, Culture and Social Transformation

by John Clammer Ananta Kumar Giri

Through a unique range of theoretical and practical case studies, this collection considers the relationship between the arts (understood as the visual arts, crafts, theatre, dance, and literature) and development, creating both a bridge between them that is rarely explored and filling in concrete ways the content of the “culture” part of the equation “culture and development”. It includes manifestations of culture and the ways in which they relate to development, and in turn contribute to such pressing issues as poverty alleviation, concern for the environment, health, empowerment, and identity formation. It shows how the arts are an essential part of the concrete understanding of culture, and as such a significant part of development thinking - including the development of culture, and not only of culture as an instrumental means to promote other development goals.

The Aesthetics of Development: Art, Culture and Social Transformation

by John Clammer Ananta Kumar Giri

Through a unique range of theoretical and practical case studies, this collection considers the relationship between the arts (understood as the visual arts, crafts, theatre, dance, and literature) and development, creating both a bridge between them that is rarely explored and filling in concrete ways the content of the “culture” part of the equation “culture and development”. It includes manifestations of culture and the ways in which they relate to development, and in turn contribute to such pressing issues as poverty alleviation, concern for the environment, health, empowerment, and identity formation. It shows how the arts are an essential part of the concrete understanding of culture, and as such a significant part of development thinking - including the development of culture, and not only of culture as an instrumental means to promote other development goals.

After 1851: The material and visual cultures of the Crystal Palace at Sydenham

by Sarah Victoria Turner Kate Nichols

Through addressing the history of Crystal Palace at Sydenham, this collection provides a valuable review of nineteenth-century visual and material culture. It broadens our understanding of how exhibitions were constructed, mediated and consumed and contributes to emerging critical debates about modernity and Modernism in the early twentieth century.

After 1851: The material and visual cultures of the Crystal Palace at Sydenham (PDF)

by Sarah Victoria Turner Kate Nichols

Through addressing the history of Crystal Palace at Sydenham, this collection provides a valuable review of nineteenth-century visual and material culture. It broadens our understanding of how exhibitions were constructed, mediated and consumed and contributes to emerging critical debates about modernity and Modernism in the early twentieth century.

After Art

by David Joselit

Art as we know it is dramatically changing, but popular and critical responses lag behind. In this trenchant illustrated essay, David Joselit describes how art and architecture are being transformed in the age of Google. Under the dual pressures of digital technology, which allows images to be reformatted and disseminated effortlessly, and the exponential acceleration of cultural exchange enabled by globalization, artists and architects are emphasizing networks as never before. Some of the most interesting contemporary work in both fields is now based on visualizing patterns of dissemination after objects and structures are produced, and after they enter into, and even establish, diverse networks. Behaving like human search engines, artists and architects sort, capture, and reformat existing content. Works of art crystallize out of populations of images, and buildings emerge out of the dynamics of the circulation patterns they will house. Examining the work of architectural firms such as OMA, Reiser + Umemoto, and Foreign Office, as well as the art of Matthew Barney, Ai Weiwei, Sherrie Levine, and many others, After Art provides a compelling and original theory of art and architecture in the age of global networks.

After Art (PDF)

by David Joselit

Art as we know it is dramatically changing, but popular and critical responses lag behind. In this trenchant illustrated essay, David Joselit describes how art and architecture are being transformed in the age of Google. Under the dual pressures of digital technology, which allows images to be reformatted and disseminated effortlessly, and the exponential acceleration of cultural exchange enabled by globalization, artists and architects are emphasizing networks as never before. Some of the most interesting contemporary work in both fields is now based on visualizing patterns of dissemination after objects and structures are produced, and after they enter into, and even establish, diverse networks. Behaving like human search engines, artists and architects sort, capture, and reformat existing content. Works of art crystallize out of populations of images, and buildings emerge out of the dynamics of the circulation patterns they will house. Examining the work of architectural firms such as OMA, Reiser + Umemoto, and Foreign Office, as well as the art of Matthew Barney, Ai Weiwei, Sherrie Levine, and many others, After Art provides a compelling and original theory of art and architecture in the age of global networks.

Ambassadors by Hans Holbein the Younger (tactile)

by Rnib

Date: 1533. Medium: Oil on oak. Size: 207 cm high by 210cm wide. Information about the painting The painting portrays two educated, wealthy and powerful diplomats; Jean de Dintville, the French Ambassador to England and his friend, George de Selve, Bishop of Lavaur. Both men were in London in 1533 to safeguard relations between the King of France and Henry VIII at a time of great religious and political uncertainty. Jean de Dinteville commissioned this painting from Holbein (1497/8-1543) to hang in his chateau of Polisy. Overview description of the painting [The letter/letters given in brackets refer to labelling on the tactile images.] This huge panel, painted with meticulous attention to detail is one of the earliest portraits combining the depiction of two full-length figures that are also life-size in scale. Jean de Dentville is on our left and George de Selve on the right. They stand a step back from us on a pavement patterned with coloured pieces of stone, similar to the floor in Westminster Abbey. Facing to the front, they gaze out of the painting and engage us with inscrutable expressions. Between them is a large piece of furniture with two shelves on which are arrayed a variety of objects, giving an indication of their wide-ranging interests. Jean de Dentville rests his left elbow (LE) and George de Selve his right on the top shelf (R). At the bottom near the left corner of the painting, the perplexing image of a distorted skull stretches diagonally across the foreground to the right. Behind the two men, a rich, green damask curtain is parted in the top left corner to reveal a tiny silver crucifix (CF).

Ambitious Form: Giambologna, Ammanati, and Danti in Florence (PDF)

by Michael W. Cole

Ambitious Form describes the transformation of Italian sculpture during the neglected half century between the death of Michelangelo and the rise of Bernini. The book follows the Florentine careers of three major sculptors--Giambologna, Bartolomeo Ammanati, and Vincenzo Danti--as they negotiated the politics of the Medici court and eyed one another's work, setting new aims for their art in the process. Only through a comparative look at Giambologna and his contemporaries, it argues, can we understand them individually--or understand the period in which they worked. Michael Cole shows how the concerns of central Italian artists changed during the last decades of the Cinquecento. Whereas their predecessors had focused on specific objects and on the particularities of materials, late sixteenth-century sculptors turned their attention to models and design. The iconic figure gave way to the pose, individualized characters to abstractions. Above all, the multiplicity of master crafts that had once divided sculptors into those who fashioned gold or bronze or stone yielded to a more unifying aspiration, as nearly every ambitious sculptor, whatever his training, strove to become an architect.

America's National Gallery of Art: Americas National Gallery of Art (PDF)

by Philip Kopper Publishing Office National Gallery of Art

Seventy-five years ago, on the brink of America's entry into World War II, the National Gallery of Art opened in Washington, DC. Founded by Andrew W. Mellon and accepted on behalf of the nation by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Mellon’s gift included his magnificent art collection and the neoclassical structure that is today’s West Building. Since its opening in 1941, the Gallery’s singular status as the nation’s art museum has continued to attract public-spirited donors. Their generosity has added tens of thousands of superb works of art and has made possible the construction of I. M. Pei’s East Building in 1978, the Sculpture Garden in 1999, and most recently a rooftop terrace and new tower galleries in the East Building. In celebration of the 75th anniversary of a beloved cultural institution, America’s National Gallery of Art takes readers on a definitive inside tour through the museum’s remarkable history. With lively prose and abundant illustrations, this richly detailed volume recounts the development of the Gallery under its four directors—David Finley, John Walker, J. Carter Brown, and currently Earl A. Powell III—and highlights the museum’s collections, exhibitions, architecture, and ambience. Later chapters explore the Gallery’s new emphasis on contemporary art and its historic 2014 agreement to accept custody of the Corcoran Collection, giving readers and visitors a window onto the future of this national treasure.

Analysing Popular Music: Image, Sound and Text

by David Machin

Electronic Inspection Copy available for instructors here Popular music is far more than just songs we listen to; its meanings are also in album covers, lyrics, subcultures, voices and video soundscapes. Like language these elements can be used to communicate complex cultural ideas, values, concepts and identities. Analysing Popular Music is a lively look at the semiotic resources found in the sounds, visuals and words that comprise the 'code book' of popular music. It explains exactly how popular music comes to mean so much. Packed with examples, exercises and a glossary, this book provides the reader with the knowledge and skills they need to carry out their own analyses of songs, soundtracks, lyrics and album covers. Written for students with no prior musical knowledge, Analysing Popular Music is the perfect toolkit for students in sociology, media and communication studies to analyse, understand - and celebrate - popular music.

Analysing Popular Music: Image, Sound and Text (PDF)

by David Machin

Electronic Inspection Copy available for instructors here Popular music is far more than just songs we listen to; its meanings are also in album covers, lyrics, subcultures, voices and video soundscapes. Like language these elements can be used to communicate complex cultural ideas, values, concepts and identities. Analysing Popular Music is a lively look at the semiotic resources found in the sounds, visuals and words that comprise the 'code book' of popular music. It explains exactly how popular music comes to mean so much. Packed with examples, exercises and a glossary, this book provides the reader with the knowledge and skills they need to carry out their own analyses of songs, soundtracks, lyrics and album covers. Written for students with no prior musical knowledge, Analysing Popular Music is the perfect toolkit for students in sociology, media and communication studies to analyse, understand - and celebrate - popular music.

Andrea Quaratesi (tactile)

by Rnib

About 1528-1532. Black chalk. Size: 41.1 x 29.2 cm. British Museum, PD 1895-9-15-519. Quaratesi was from a rich Florentine banking family, and Michelangelo gave him drawing lessons in the mid-1520s (see image 6). The family reputedly sheltered the artist when the second Florentine republic fell in 1530 and the Medici regained power. The sitters identity is known from an inscription on an old copy of the drawing, making this the only certainly identifiable portrait by Michelangelo. The drawing is a detailed head and shoulders portrait of a young man dressed in costume of the period - a large flat hat, collared jacket with slightly puffed sleeves and a shirt with buttons under the jacket. His left shoulder is facing the viewer, his head turned slightly to his left. He is not looking directly at the viewer as he is looking over towards his left and has a very solemn look on his face. The tactile image uses lines to define the outline of the face and facial features with a solid texture to show the hat, buttons on shirt and collar of his jacket. Rough texture shows the hair, eyebrows and jacket. Braille labels are as follows: hat, ear, mouth, eye, nose, collar, and jacket.

Angel of the North by Antony Gormley (Large Print)

by Rnib

This is an image of a steel sculpture of a standing man with wings, his head is top centre and feet bottom centre of the page. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left when the image is the right way up. The man is facing forward. He has no facial features and his legs and feet are not separated. Instead of arms he has long aeroplane wings which stretch out to the left and right. The thin vertical lines are ridges of steel which are part of the sculptures structure. It is unpainted, the orange red colour comes from natural rust staining.

Angel of the North by Antony Gormley (UEB Contracted)

by Rnib

This is an image of a steel sculpture of a standing man with wings, his head is top centre and feet bottom centre of the page. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left when the image is the right way up. The man is facing forward. He has no facial features and his legs and feet are not separated. Instead of arms he has long aeroplane wings which stretch out to the left and right. The thin vertical lines are ridges of steel which are part of the sculptures structure. It is unpainted, the orange red colour comes from natural rust staining.

Angel of the North by Antony Gormley (UEB Uncontracted)

by Rnib

This is an image of a steel sculpture of a standing man with wings, his head is top centre and feet bottom centre of the page. There is a locator dot shown, which will be at the top left when the image is the right way up. The man is facing forward. He has no facial features and his legs and feet are not separated. Instead of arms he has long aeroplane wings which stretch out to the left and right. The thin vertical lines are ridges of steel which are part of the sculptures structure. It is unpainted, the orange red colour comes from natural rust staining.

Angel Over Canterbury by Sara Wicks (tactile)

by Rnib

2001; by Sara Wicks (born 1965); mixed media on handmade paper, mounted in a grey wood box frame; paper: 29 cm high by 41 cm wide, frame: 47 cm high by 58 cm wide. The painting was commissioned as a cover for the Canterbury Festival brochure in 2001. Sara says: I wanted to celebrate the unique history of the city and decided to do this by collaging together the iconic architectural landmarks, centring on the Cathedral. The angel is a reference to the spiritual importance of the city. My choice of bright colour was to reinforce the positivity of the image as well as being eye-catching for the Festivs purposes. I made the piece by painting the different component images on separate bits of paper and collaging them together: the painting surface has gained in thickness and texture where I have reworked areas. This brightly coloured painting shows the River Stour as a royal blue strip along the bottom edge of the painting with black lines and shapes in it to give an idea of the water. Above the river are three iconic views of Canterbury set on a dark green strip - on the left is Dane John mound, in the centre Canterbury Cathedral, and on the right the West Gate Towers. Dane John is shown as a green mound with black spiral pathway leading to the rounded top that is surmounted by a white tiered memorial. Originally a prehistoric burial mound, it was landscaped in the 18th century under the direction of Alderman Simmons whose memorial now stands on the top. Canterbury Cathedral shown from the north side with its central tower (Bell Harry Tower) and western front. The cathedral has been outlined in black infilled with shades of brown. The windows and western door are shown in black and an idea of the leaded roof shown as grey with light blue highlights. The West Gate Towers, Canterbury's only surviving medieval gate is shown from the front (from St Dunstan's), and consists of two round towers with a gateway between. This is again outlined in black and infilled with a stone colour. The slits on each tower are gun loops, the first in England. The main gateway, which was originally protected with a heavy wooden door, drawbridge and murder holes (through which boiling oil could be poured on attackers) is shown in black. Arching over the whole scene is an Angel, dressed in a long white robe with bare feet, blowing a golden trumpet set against a yellow sky. The Angel has long brown hair that flows out behind her. The trumpet, held in both hands, points up to an orange sun in the top right hand corner of the painting. The circular sun has clearly depicted thick rays radiating out from it. The yellow sky turns to orange along the painting's top edge to form a contrasting border to the blue river at the bottom. The painting is signed and dated SW 01 in the bottom right hand corner. The tactile image is approximately half the size of the actual painting. A broken thick line shows the edge of the frame. The river is shown by a texture with a thick line for the river bank. A thick line also outlines the angel with thinner lines for the hair and facial features. Thinner lines also define the outlines of the cathedral, West Gate Towers, outline of the mound. The dark green strip above the river is shown by a different texture that is also used for the orange sky. The yellow sky has no texture. A further texture shows the white robe of the angel, the roof of the cathedral and Dane John mound with hollows for the spiral path. Solid texture shows the sun, the trumpet, the windows and doors on the cathedral and West Gate Towers, and the memorial on top of Dane John mound.

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