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Meaning in History: The Theological Implications of the Philosophy of History

by Karl Löwith

Modern man sees with one eye of faith and one eye of reason. Consequently, his view of history is confused. For centuries, the history of the Western world has been viewed from the Christian or classical standpoint—from a deep faith in the Kingdom of God or a belief in recurrent and eternal life-cycles. The modern mind, however, is neither Christian nor pagan—and its interpretations of history are Christian in derivation and anti-Christian in result. To develop this theory, Karl Löwith—beginning with the more accessible philosophies of history in the nineteenth and eighteenth centuries and working back to the Bible—analyzes the writings of outstanding historians both in antiquity and in Christian times. "A book of distinction and great importance. . . . The author is a master of philosophical interpretation, and each of his terse and substantial chapters has the balance of a work of art."—Helmut Kuhn, Journal of Philosophy

Meaning in History: The Theological Implications of the Philosophy of History

by Karl Löwith

Modern man sees with one eye of faith and one eye of reason. Consequently, his view of history is confused. For centuries, the history of the Western world has been viewed from the Christian or classical standpoint—from a deep faith in the Kingdom of God or a belief in recurrent and eternal life-cycles. The modern mind, however, is neither Christian nor pagan—and its interpretations of history are Christian in derivation and anti-Christian in result. To develop this theory, Karl Löwith—beginning with the more accessible philosophies of history in the nineteenth and eighteenth centuries and working back to the Bible—analyzes the writings of outstanding historians both in antiquity and in Christian times. "A book of distinction and great importance. . . . The author is a master of philosophical interpretation, and each of his terse and substantial chapters has the balance of a work of art."—Helmut Kuhn, Journal of Philosophy

The Uniqueness of the Individual (Routledge Library Editions: Evolution #8)

by P.B. Medawar

Originally published in 1957, The Uniqueness of the Individual is a collection of 9 essays published from the ten years preceding publication. The essays deal with some of the central problems of biology. These are among the questions put and answered from the standpoint of modern experimental biology. What is ageing and how is it measured? What theories have been held to account for it, and with what success? Did ageing evolve, and if so how? Is Lamarckism and adequate explanation of evolutionary process? Does evolution sometimes go wrong? Do human beings evolve in a way peculiar to themselves? Other essays touch upon the problems of scientific method and of growth and transformation. This book will be of interest to natural historians, evolutionists and anthropologists.

The Uniqueness of the Individual (Routledge Library Editions: Evolution #8)

by P.B. Medawar

Originally published in 1957, The Uniqueness of the Individual is a collection of 9 essays published from the ten years preceding publication. The essays deal with some of the central problems of biology. These are among the questions put and answered from the standpoint of modern experimental biology. What is ageing and how is it measured? What theories have been held to account for it, and with what success? Did ageing evolve, and if so how? Is Lamarckism and adequate explanation of evolutionary process? Does evolution sometimes go wrong? Do human beings evolve in a way peculiar to themselves? Other essays touch upon the problems of scientific method and of growth and transformation. This book will be of interest to natural historians, evolutionists and anthropologists.

Lineage Organisation in South-Eastern China

by Maurice Freedman

This essay is the work of a social anthropologist but it is not based upon field work. It is concerned with Chinese matters but it is not written by a sinologue. In this essay are the author’s reflections on certain aspects of southeastern Chinese society during the last hundred and fifty years, with attention on the Fukien and Kwangtung region of China has it has specialized not only in large-scale unilineal organization but also in sending people overseas.

Lineage Organisation in South-Eastern China

by Maurice Freedman

This essay is the work of a social anthropologist but it is not based upon field work. It is concerned with Chinese matters but it is not written by a sinologue. In this essay are the author’s reflections on certain aspects of southeastern Chinese society during the last hundred and fifty years, with attention on the Fukien and Kwangtung region of China has it has specialized not only in large-scale unilineal organization but also in sending people overseas.

Transport Policy Problems at National and International Level: A Contribution by the Transport Workers' Unions (Routledge Revivals)

by International Transport Worker's Federation

Published in 1959, this book presents a study of transport problems including those of the coordination of inland transport, and special problems of coordination in areas of urban transport, civil aviation, sea ports and arising problems in the course of the economic integration of Europe.

Transport Policy Problems at National and International Level: A Contribution by the Transport Workers' Unions (Routledge Revivals)

by International Transport Worker's Federation

Published in 1959, this book presents a study of transport problems including those of the coordination of inland transport, and special problems of coordination in areas of urban transport, civil aviation, sea ports and arising problems in the course of the economic integration of Europe.

The Future of Man: The BBC Reith Lectures 1959 (Routledge Library Editions: Evolution #7)

by P.B. Medawar

Originally published in 1960, The Future of Man is a chronicle of Professor Medwar’s Reith lectures of 1959. The book outlines his predictions about the future estate of man, with the ‘process of foretelling, rather than with what is actually foretold’. He asks, can we predict the future size of populations? What is the evidence and theoretical background for the belief that human intelligence is declining? Could human beings become uniformly excellent or is inborn diversity and inequality a necessary part of the texture of human populations? The lectures tried to answer these questions and attempts to end with a definition of the biological standing of man. This book will be of interest to anthropologists, biologists and natural historians.

The Future of Man: The BBC Reith Lectures 1959 (Routledge Library Editions: Evolution #7)

by P.B. Medawar

Originally published in 1960, The Future of Man is a chronicle of Professor Medwar’s Reith lectures of 1959. The book outlines his predictions about the future estate of man, with the ‘process of foretelling, rather than with what is actually foretold’. He asks, can we predict the future size of populations? What is the evidence and theoretical background for the belief that human intelligence is declining? Could human beings become uniformly excellent or is inborn diversity and inequality a necessary part of the texture of human populations? The lectures tried to answer these questions and attempts to end with a definition of the biological standing of man. This book will be of interest to anthropologists, biologists and natural historians.

The Death of Tragedy

by Professor George Steiner

'This book is important-and portentous-for if it is true that tragedy is dead, we face a vital cultural loss. . . . The book is bound to start controversy. . . . The very passion and insight with which he writes about the tragedies that have moved him prove that the vision still lives and that words can still enlighten and reveal.'R.B. Sewall, New York Times Book Review

The Role of Speech in the Regulation of Normal and Abnormal Behavior

by Alexander R. Luria

The Role of Speech in the Regulation of Normal and Abnormal Behavior examines the role of speech in the regulation of normal and abnormal behavior. Research findings on the regulatory role of verbal communication in ontogenesis and its disruption under various pathological states of the brain are summarized. The role of speech in the formation of mental processes is also discussed, along with the development of the regulatory role of speech.Comprised of three chapters, this book begins with a detailed account of the role of speech in the formation and evolution of mental processes in hopes of identifying the mechanisms underlying complex mental activities. It shows that speech enters integrally into the structure of mental processes and that it is a powerful means of regulating human behavior. The second chapter explores how the regulatory function of speech is formed and how it influences the formation of voluntary movements. The last chapter considers the relationship between speech and action as a criterion for identifying various forms of pathological behavior and for analyzing the compensation of the defects that result from it.This monograph will be of interest to psychologists.

What the Butler Saw: Two Hundred and Fifty Years of the Servant Problem

by E. S. Turner

'A book which goes on a special shelf in my library.' P.G. WodehouseWhat the Butler Saw (1962) is one of E.S. Turner's most pertinent and illuminating 'social histories', an exploration of the 'upstairs/downstairs' relationship across three centuries of English life. Drawing on literature, contemporary accounts and household manuals, Turner describes in fascinating detail how it came to be that the upper classes felt a need for an ever larger household staff, engaged in every imaginable form of drudgery; and, accordingly, how those in service - from high to low, butler to footman, housemaid to au pair - had to give satisfaction to their masters and mistresses while also, on occasions, contending with physical blows, tantrums, and (in the cases of some unfortunate servant girls) threats to their virtue.

Dental Anthropology: Volume V: Society for the Study of Human Biology

by D. R. Brothwell

Symposia of the Society for the Study of Human Biology, Volume V: Dental Anthropology is a collection of papers that covers the application of dental pathology in the context of anthropology. The book presents 15 studies that cover various human dental variables and relates to different anthropological factors. The dental variables considered in the articles include tooth morphology; occlusion and malocclusion of primate teeth; morphogenesis of deciduous molar pattern in man; and double-rooted human lower canine teeth. The text also covers topics about race specific dental traits such as radiographic study of the Neanderthal teeth from Krapina; crown characters of the deciduous dentition of the Japanese-American hybrids; and analysis of the American Indian dentition. The selection will be of great interest to evolutionary scientists, such as anthropologists and paleontologists.

A Grammar of the Margi Language (Linguistic Surveys of Africa #2)

by Carl Hoffmann

Originally published in 1963, this was, and still is, the only Grammar to be published of the Margi language which is spoken by the people of the Adamawa and Bornu areas of Nigeria. Definitions and explanations ahve been given in as explicitya form as possible, especially where the average student could not be expected to be familiar with the terminology. Numerous examples have been added to illustrate the theoretical explanations.

A Grammar of the Margi Language (Linguistic Surveys of Africa #2)

by Carl Hoffmann

Originally published in 1963, this was, and still is, the only Grammar to be published of the Margi language which is spoken by the people of the Adamawa and Bornu areas of Nigeria. Definitions and explanations ahve been given in as explicitya form as possible, especially where the average student could not be expected to be familiar with the terminology. Numerous examples have been added to illustrate the theoretical explanations.

The Last Chronicle of Bouverie Street: On The Closure Of The News Chronicle And The Star (Routledge Library Editions: Journalism #7)

by George Glenton William Pattinson

Originally published in 1963. This book tells the story of the closure of the News Chronicle and its London evening companion The Star as seen by two journalists on the News Chronicle. They describe the Daily News tradition, record some of its finest hours and write about some of the greatest journalists who served their employers loyally. They endeavour to unravel what went on in Bouverie Street immediately before, at the moment of the crash and afterwards. The merger of these two prominent organs of public opinion with the Daily Mail and Evening News made splash headlines and was widely discussed in the press, on television and radio. Faithful readers were dismayed, politicians were alarmed, and the staff of the newspapers were indignant. For 114 years the Daily News and its modern successor the News Chronicle had weathered financial storms and overcome gales of prejudice and political opinion to become one of the most respected morning papers. The Star had, since 1888, fought the cause of the underdog and earned the affection and gratitude of many Londoners. This book highlights the feelings of men and women who were proud to work for their paper but did not know till almost the very last that they were fighting a losing battle, and how and why some of them kept the secret.

The Last Chronicle of Bouverie Street (Routledge Library Editions: Journalism)

by George Glenton William Pattinson

Originally published in 1963. This book tells the story of the closure of the News Chronicle and its London evening companion The Star as seen by two journalists on the News Chronicle. They describe the Daily News tradition, record some of its finest hours and write about some of the greatest journalists who served their employers loyally. They endeavour to unravel what went on in Bouverie Street immediately before, at the moment of the crash and afterwards. The merger of these two prominent organs of public opinion with the Daily Mail and Evening News made splash headlines and was widely discussed in the press, on television and radio. Faithful readers were dismayed, politicians were alarmed, and the staff of the newspapers were indignant. For 114 years the Daily News and its modern successor the News Chronicle had weathered financial storms and overcome gales of prejudice and political opinion to become one of the most respected morning papers. The Star had, since 1888, fought the cause of the underdog and earned the affection and gratitude of many Londoners. This book highlights the feelings of men and women who were proud to work for their paper but did not know till almost the very last that they were fighting a losing battle, and how and why some of them kept the secret.

On the Shop Floor: Two Studies of Workshop Organization and Output

by T. Lupton

On the Shop Floor: Two Studies of Workshop Organization and Output is an empirical study of the social factors influencing output in factories. The book investigates the correlation between worker social behavior and production output levels. The text presents a firsthand account of the social behavior of workers in two separate and unrelated workshops. Technological and administrative controls, social structure, and resolution of conflicts in the workshops are analyzed. The book also considers output performance of individual workers involving case studies of factors influencing performance. The general conclusion provides hypotheses to explain the differences in behavior between the two workshops. Managers, human resource practitioners, sociologists, industrial engineers, researchers, and business students will find the book invaluable.

Aging Process of Population

by Edward Rosset

Aging Process of Population investigates and analyzes the phenomenon of population aging. The text aims to provide a quantitative and qualitative analyses of structural transformations caused by the aging population on modern societies in various parts of the world. The book is organized into four parts. The first part deals with problems in methodologies, such as methods to measure demographic old age; hypothetical and perspective computation tools; and deficient methodological uniformity of source materials. The second part discusses the beginning of old age; analysis of life tables; and the method of computing the normal length of life. Population structure by age in different time periods; dynamics of the changes in the age composition of populations in seven select countries; and the problem of dependency of non-productive elements on the population of productive age are examined in Part III. The last part provides the effect of fertility, reduction of mortality, migration, and war in the determination of the age structure of populations. Demographers, sociologists, statisticians, economists, politicians, market researchers, ecologists, and students will find the book invaluable.

Etiquette (Collins Nutshell Books)

by Martine Legge

Ever wondered about the correct way to address a Duke? Or how to get out of a car elegantly? What do you do if you embarrass yourself in public? These, and a whole host of other practical questions, are answered in this charming pocket-sized book.

Folktales of Norway (Folktales of the World)

by Reidar Christiansen; translated by Pat Shaw Iversen

Often lacking the clear episodic structure of folktales about talking animals and magic objects, legends grow from retellings of personal experiences. Christiansen isolated some seventy-seven legend types, and many of these are represented here in absorbing stories of St. Olaf, hidden treasures, witches, and spirits of the air, water, and earth. The ugly, massively strong, but slow-witted trolls are familiar to English-speaking readers. Less well-known, but the subject of an enormous number of legends, are the more manlike yet sinister "huldre-folk" who live in houses and try to woo human girls. These tales reflect the wildness of Norway, its mountains, forests, lakes, and sea, and the stalwart character of its sparse population. "The translation is excellent, retaining the traditional Norwegian style . . . the tales themselves will also appeal to the interested layman."—Library Journal

Folktales of Norway (Folktales of the World)

by Pat Shaw Iversen Reidar T. Christiansen

Often lacking the clear episodic structure of folktales about talking animals and magic objects, legends grow from retellings of personal experiences. Christiansen isolated some seventy-seven legend types, and many of these are represented here in absorbing stories of St. Olaf, hidden treasures, witches, and spirits of the air, water, and earth. The ugly, massively strong, but slow-witted trolls are familiar to English-speaking readers. Less well-known, but the subject of an enormous number of legends, are the more manlike yet sinister "huldre-folk" who live in houses and try to woo human girls. These tales reflect the wildness of Norway, its mountains, forests, lakes, and sea, and the stalwart character of its sparse population. "The translation is excellent, retaining the traditional Norwegian style . . . the tales themselves will also appeal to the interested layman."—Library Journal

Folktales of Norway (Folktales of the World)


Often lacking the clear episodic structure of folktales about talking animals and magic objects, legends grow from retellings of personal experiences. Christiansen isolated some seventy-seven legend types, and many of these are represented here in absorbing stories of St. Olaf, hidden treasures, witches, and spirits of the air, water, and earth. The ugly, massively strong, but slow-witted trolls are familiar to English-speaking readers. Less well-known, but the subject of an enormous number of legends, are the more manlike yet sinister "huldre-folk" who live in houses and try to woo human girls. These tales reflect the wildness of Norway, its mountains, forests, lakes, and sea, and the stalwart character of its sparse population. "The translation is excellent, retaining the traditional Norwegian style . . . the tales themselves will also appeal to the interested layman."—Library Journal

Folktales of Norway (Folktales of the World)

by Reidar Christiansen; translated by Pat Shaw Iversen

Often lacking the clear episodic structure of folktales about talking animals and magic objects, legends grow from retellings of personal experiences. Christiansen isolated some seventy-seven legend types, and many of these are represented here in absorbing stories of St. Olaf, hidden treasures, witches, and spirits of the air, water, and earth. The ugly, massively strong, but slow-witted trolls are familiar to English-speaking readers. Less well-known, but the subject of an enormous number of legends, are the more manlike yet sinister "huldre-folk" who live in houses and try to woo human girls. These tales reflect the wildness of Norway, its mountains, forests, lakes, and sea, and the stalwart character of its sparse population. "The translation is excellent, retaining the traditional Norwegian style . . . the tales themselves will also appeal to the interested layman."—Library Journal

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