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The 1947 Partition in The East: Trends and Trajectories

by Subhasri Ghosh

This book explores the experience of people affected by the partition of British India and princely states in 1947 through first person accounts, memoirs, archival material, literature, and cinema. It focuses on the displacement, violence and trauma of the people affected and interrogates the interrelationships between nationalism, temporality, religion, and citizenship. The author examines the mass migrations triggered by the 1947 partition, amidst nationalist posturing, religious violence, and debates on crucial issues of refugee rehabilitation and redistribution of land and resources. It focuses on the drawing of the borders and the ruptures in the socio-cultural bonds within regions and communities brought on by demographic changes, violence, and displacement. The volume reflects on the significant mark left by the event on the socio-political sensibilities of various communities, and the questions of identity and citizenship. It also studies the effects of the partition on the politics of Bangladesh and India’s east and northeast states, specifically Bengal, Assam and Tripura. A significant addition to the existing corpus on partition historiography, this book will be of interest to modern Indian history, partition studies, border studies, sociology, refugee and migration studies, cultural studies, literature, post-colonial studies and South Asian studies, particularly those concerned with Bengal, Northeast India and Bangladesh.

The 1947 Partition in The East: Trends and Trajectories

by Subhasri Ghosh

This book explores the experience of people affected by the partition of British India and princely states in 1947 through first person accounts, memoirs, archival material, literature, and cinema. It focuses on the displacement, violence and trauma of the people affected and interrogates the interrelationships between nationalism, temporality, religion, and citizenship. The author examines the mass migrations triggered by the 1947 partition, amidst nationalist posturing, religious violence, and debates on crucial issues of refugee rehabilitation and redistribution of land and resources. It focuses on the drawing of the borders and the ruptures in the socio-cultural bonds within regions and communities brought on by demographic changes, violence, and displacement. The volume reflects on the significant mark left by the event on the socio-political sensibilities of various communities, and the questions of identity and citizenship. It also studies the effects of the partition on the politics of Bangladesh and India’s east and northeast states, specifically Bengal, Assam and Tripura. A significant addition to the existing corpus on partition historiography, this book will be of interest to modern Indian history, partition studies, border studies, sociology, refugee and migration studies, cultural studies, literature, post-colonial studies and South Asian studies, particularly those concerned with Bengal, Northeast India and Bangladesh.

1950s American Fashion (Shire Library USA)

by Jonathan Walford

The 1950s was the first decade when American fashion became truly American. The United States had always relied on Europe for its style leads, but during World War II, when necessity became the mother of invention, the country had to find its own way. American designers looked to what American women needed and found new inspirations for American fashion design. Sportswear became a strength, but not at the expense of elegance. Easy-wear materials were adapted for producing more formal clothes, and versatile separates and adaptable dress and jacket suits became hallmarks of American style. This book follows the American fashion industry from New York's 7th Avenue to the beaches of California in search of the clothes that defined 1950s American fashion.

1950s American Fashion (Shire Library USA)

by Jonathan Walford

The 1950s was the first decade when American fashion became truly American. The United States had always relied on Europe for its style leads, but during World War II, when necessity became the mother of invention, the country had to find its own way. American designers looked to what American women needed and found new inspirations for American fashion design. Sportswear became a strength, but not at the expense of elegance. Easy-wear materials were adapted for producing more formal clothes, and versatile separates and adaptable dress and jacket suits became hallmarks of American style. This book follows the American fashion industry from New York's 7th Avenue to the beaches of California in search of the clothes that defined 1950s American fashion.

1950s Childhood: Growing Up In Post-war Britain (Shire Library #737)

by Janet Shepherd John Shepherd

Children of the 1950s have much to look back on with fondness: Muffin the Mule, Andy Pandy, and Dennis the Menace became part of the family for many, while for others the freedom of the riverbank or railway platform was a haven away from the watchful eyes of parents. The postwar welfare state offered free orange juice, milk and healthcare, and there was lots to do, whether football in the street, a double bill at the cinema, a game of Ludo or a spot of roller-skating. But there were also hardships: wartime rationing persisted into the '50s, a trip to the dentist was a painful ordeal, and at school discipline was harsh and the Eleven-Plus exam was a formidable milestone. Janet Shepherd and John Shepherd examine what it was like to grow up part of the Baby Boomer generation, showing what life was like at home and at school and introducing a new phenomenon – the teenager.

1950s Childhood: Growing up in post-war Britain (Shire Library)

by Janet Shepherd John Shepherd

Children of the 1950s have much to look back on with fondness: Muffin the Mule, Andy Pandy, and Dennis the Menace became part of the family for many, while for others the freedom of the riverbank or railway platform was a haven away from the watchful eyes of parents. The postwar welfare state offered free orange juice, milk and healthcare, and there was lots to do, whether football in the street, a double bill at the cinema, a game of Ludo or a spot of roller-skating. But there were also hardships: wartime rationing persisted into the '50s, a trip to the dentist was a painful ordeal, and at school discipline was harsh and the Eleven-Plus exam was a formidable milestone. Janet Shepherd and John Shepherd examine what it was like to grow up part of the Baby Boomer generation, showing what life was like at home and at school and introducing a new phenomenon – the teenager.

1950s “Rocketman” TV Series and Their Fans: Cadets, Rangers, and Junior Space Men

by Cynthia J. Miller

The fourteen essays featured here focus on series such as Space Patrol, Tom Corbett, and Captain Z-Ro, exploring their roles in the day-to-day lives of their fans through topics such as mentoring, promotion of the real-world space program, merchandising, gender issues, and ranger clubs - all the while promoting the fledgling medium of television.

The 1960s Home (Shire Library #604)

by Paul Evans

The 1960s witnessed a sustained period of economic growth, consumer spending and stable employment. This hitherto unknown prosperity enabled a market growth in levels of owner occupation and a subsequent boom in the sale of household furnishings and luxury goods. The 1960s Home looks at the styles and fashions in domestic housing and interiors between 1960 and 1970. Although this period has received increasing attention in recent years, much of it has been concentrated on progressive and exclusive design rather than on the furniture and furnishing of the 'average' home.

The 1960s Home (Shire Library #604)

by Paul Evans

The 1960s witnessed a sustained period of economic growth, consumer spending and stable employment. This hitherto unknown prosperity enabled a market growth in levels of owner occupation and a subsequent boom in the sale of household furnishings and luxury goods. The 1960s Home looks at the styles and fashions in domestic housing and interiors between 1960 and 1970. Although this period has received increasing attention in recent years, much of it has been concentrated on progressive and exclusive design rather than on the furniture and furnishing of the 'average' home.

1964 - 2004: Aufbruch, Aufstieg und neue Ungewissheit

by Werner Lindner

Vierzig Jahre nach dem programmatischen Sammelwerk "Was ist Jugendarbeit?" treffen damalige Initiatoren der Kinder- und Jugendarbeit auf jene, die sich gegenwärtig um neue Konzepte des sich verändernden Handlungsfelds bemühen. Vor dem Hintergrund der Theorieansätze von 1964 wird erneut untersucht, welche Orientierungen für professionelle, theoretische und gesellschaftspolitische Verortung der Kinder- und Jugendarbeit künftig bestehen.

1966: The Year the Decade Exploded

by Jon Savage

The pop world accelerated and broke through the sound barrier in 1966. In America, in London, in Amsterdam, in Paris, revolutionary ideas slow-cooking since the late '50s reached boiling point. In the worlds of pop, pop art, fashion and radical politics -- often fueled by perception-enhancing substances and literature -- the 'Sixties', as we have come to know them, hit their Modernist peak. A unique chemistry of ideas, substances, freedom of expression and dialogue across pop cultural continents created a landscape of immense and eventually shattering creativity. After 1966 nothing in the pop world would ever be the same. The 7 inch single outsold the long-player for the final time. It was the year in which the ever lasting and transient pop moment would burst forth in its most articulate, instinctive and radical way. Jon Savage's 1966 is a monument to the year that shaped the pop future of the balance of the century. Exploring canonical artists like The Beatles, The Byrds, Velvet Underground, The Who and The Kinks, 1966 also goes much deeper into the social and cultural heart of the decade through unique archival primary sources.

1968: Year of Media Decision

by Robert Giles Robert W. Snyder

Thirty years ago American political life was all relentless, painful, and confounding: the Tet Offensive brought new intensity to the Vietnam War; President Lyndon Johnson would not seek re-election; Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy were assassinated; student protests rocked France; a Soviet invasion ended "socialism with a human face" in Czechoslovakia; the Mexican government massacred scores of peaceful demonstrators; and Richard M. Nixon was elected president. Any one of the events of 1968 bears claim to historical significance. Together they set off shock waves that divided Americans into new and contending categories: hawks and doves, old and young, feminists and chauvinists, straights and hippies, blacks and whites, militants and moderates. As citizens alive to their own time and as reporters responsible for making sense of it, journalists did not stand aside from the conflicts of 1968. In their lives and in their work, they grappled with momentous issues--war, politics, race, and protest.

1968: The Year that Rocked the World

by Mark Kurlansky

It was the year of sex and drugs and rock and roll; it was also the year of the Martin Luther King and Bobby Kennedy assassinations, the Prague Spring, the Chicago convention, the Tet offensive in Vietnam and the anti-war movement, the student rebellion that paralysed France, civil rights, the beginning of the end for the Soviet Union, and the birth of the women's movement. With 1968: The Year that Rocked the World, award-winning journalist Mark Kurlansky has written his Magnum opus - a cultural and political history of that world-changing year of social upheaval, when television's impact on global events first became apparent, and when simultaneously - in Paris, Prague, London, Berkeley, and all over the globe - uprisings spontaneously occurred. 1968 encompasses the worlds of youth and music, politics, war, economics, assassinations, riots, demonstrations and the media, and shows us how we got to where we are today.

1968: Year of Media Decision

by Robert Snyder

Thirty years ago American political life was all relentless, painful, and confounding: the Tet Offensive brought new intensity to the Vietnam War; President Lyndon Johnson would not seek re-election; Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy were assassinated; student protests rocked France; a Soviet invasion ended "socialism with a human face" in Czechoslovakia; the Mexican government massacred scores of peaceful demonstrators; and Richard M. Nixon was elected president. Any one of the events of 1968 bears claim to historical significance. Together they set off shock waves that divided Americans into new and contending categories: hawks and doves, old and young, feminists and chauvinists, straights and hippies, blacks and whites, militants and moderates. As citizens alive to their own time and as reporters responsible for making sense of it, journalists did not stand aside from the conflicts of 1968. In their lives and in their work, they grappled with momentous issues--war, politics, race, and protest.

1968. Handbuch zur Kultur- und Mediengeschichte der Studentenbewegung


Die 68er polarisieren noch heute: Politisch gescheitert, erfolgreich in der Entwicklung neuer Lebensstile? Dabei gingen Kulturrevolution und Medienevolution Hand in Hand. Presse, Rundfunk und Fernsehen stilisierten Rudi Dutschke, die Kommune I, Che Guevara oder Mao neben den Rolling Stones oder Jimi Hendrix zu Ikonen einer jugendlichen Protestkultur. War die 68-Bewegung mehr als die Inszenierung von Ereignissen im Medienformat? Entlang der Stichworte Happening, Sit-in, Diskussionsfieber, Protestinszenierung u. a. vermittelt das Handbuch einen neuen Blick auf eine politische Strömung, die die Jahrzehnte danach entscheidend verändert und geprägt hat.

1968 in Europe: A History of Protest and Activism, 1956–1977 (Palgrave Macmillan Transnational History Series)

by M. Klimke J. Scharloth

A concise reference for researchers on the protest movements of the 1960s and 1970s, this book covers the history of the various national protest movements, the transnational aspects of these movements, and the common narratives and cultures of memory surrounding them.

1968 In Retrospect: History, Theory, Alterity

by Gurminder K. Bhambra Ipek Demir

This volume examines the protest movements of 1968 from innovative perspectives. With contributions from leading social theorists the book reflects on the untold narratives of race, gender and sexuality and critically addresses the standard theoretical assumptions of 1968 to discuss overlooked perspectives.

1968 In Retrospect: History, Theory, Alterity (PDF)

by Gurminder K. Bhambra Ipek Demir

This volume examines the protest movements of 1968 from innovative perspectives. With contributions from leading social theorists the book reflects on the untold narratives of race, gender and sexuality and critically addresses the standard theoretical assumptions of 1968 to discuss overlooked perspectives.

1970s Childhood (Shire Library)

by Liza Hollinghurst

A 1970s childhood was, for many, a life of happy-go-lucky freedom set against a soundtrack of pop music played on a transistor radio dangling from the handlebars of a Raleigh Chopper. It was a playground battlefield of Sindy versus Action Man or a dexterous display of how to handle Clackers without painfully rapping them across the knuckles. After-school television meant a choice of 'Blue Peter' or 'Magpie', while chewing on an Aztec chocolate bar and flicking through Shoot or Jackie magazine. Yet it was also a decade of strikes, the three-day week and the Winter of Discontent which passed most children by unless a power cut meant no television. This fully illustrated book is a celebration of that childhood, its highs, lows and scraped knees, that will readily bring back the forgotten memories of a generation that grew up without mobile phones, the internet and 24-hour shopping.

1970s Childhood (Shire Library #859)

by Liza Hollinghurst

A 1970s childhood was, for many, a life of happy-go-lucky freedom set against a soundtrack of pop music played on a transistor radio dangling from the handlebars of a Raleigh Chopper. It was a playground battlefield of Sindy versus Action Man or a dexterous display of how to handle Clackers without painfully rapping them across the knuckles. After-school television meant a choice of 'Blue Peter' or 'Magpie', while chewing on an Aztec chocolate bar and flicking through Shoot or Jackie magazine. Yet it was also a decade of strikes, the three-day week and the Winter of Discontent which passed most children by unless a power cut meant no television. This fully illustrated book is a celebration of that childhood, its highs, lows and scraped knees, that will readily bring back the forgotten memories of a generation that grew up without mobile phones, the internet and 24-hour shopping.

1971: A Year in the Life of Color

by Darby English

In this book, art historian Darby English explores the year 1971, when two exhibitions opened that brought modernist painting and sculpture into the burning heart of United States cultural politics: Contemporary Black Artists in America, at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and The DeLuxe Show, a racially integrated abstract art exhibition presented in a renovated movie theater in a Houston ghetto. 1971: A Year in the Life of Color looks at many black artists’ desire to gain freedom from overt racial representation, as well as their efforts—and those of their advocates—to further that aim through public exhibition. Amid calls to define a “black aesthetic,” these experiments with modernist art prioritized cultural interaction and instability. Contemporary Black Artists in America highlighted abstraction as a stance against normative approaches, while The DeLuxe Show positioned abstraction in a center of urban blight. The importance of these experiments, English argues, came partly from color’s special status as a cultural symbol and partly from investigations of color already under way in late modern art and criticism. With their supporters, black modernists—among them Peter Bradley, Frederick Eversley, Alvin Loving, Raymond Saunders, and Alma Thomas—rose above the demand to represent or be represented, compromising nothing in their appeals for interracial collaboration and, above all, responding with optimism rather than cynicism to the surrounding culture’s preoccupation with color.

1971: A Year in the Life of Color

by Darby English

In this book, art historian Darby English explores the year 1971, when two exhibitions opened that brought modernist painting and sculpture into the burning heart of United States cultural politics: Contemporary Black Artists in America, at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and The DeLuxe Show, a racially integrated abstract art exhibition presented in a renovated movie theater in a Houston ghetto. 1971: A Year in the Life of Color looks at many black artists’ desire to gain freedom from overt racial representation, as well as their efforts—and those of their advocates—to further that aim through public exhibition. Amid calls to define a “black aesthetic,” these experiments with modernist art prioritized cultural interaction and instability. Contemporary Black Artists in America highlighted abstraction as a stance against normative approaches, while The DeLuxe Show positioned abstraction in a center of urban blight. The importance of these experiments, English argues, came partly from color’s special status as a cultural symbol and partly from investigations of color already under way in late modern art and criticism. With their supporters, black modernists—among them Peter Bradley, Frederick Eversley, Alvin Loving, Raymond Saunders, and Alma Thomas—rose above the demand to represent or be represented, compromising nothing in their appeals for interracial collaboration and, above all, responding with optimism rather than cynicism to the surrounding culture’s preoccupation with color.

1971: A Year in the Life of Color

by Darby English

In this book, art historian Darby English explores the year 1971, when two exhibitions opened that brought modernist painting and sculpture into the burning heart of United States cultural politics: Contemporary Black Artists in America, at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and The DeLuxe Show, a racially integrated abstract art exhibition presented in a renovated movie theater in a Houston ghetto. 1971: A Year in the Life of Color looks at many black artists’ desire to gain freedom from overt racial representation, as well as their efforts—and those of their advocates—to further that aim through public exhibition. Amid calls to define a “black aesthetic,” these experiments with modernist art prioritized cultural interaction and instability. Contemporary Black Artists in America highlighted abstraction as a stance against normative approaches, while The DeLuxe Show positioned abstraction in a center of urban blight. The importance of these experiments, English argues, came partly from color’s special status as a cultural symbol and partly from investigations of color already under way in late modern art and criticism. With their supporters, black modernists—among them Peter Bradley, Frederick Eversley, Alvin Loving, Raymond Saunders, and Alma Thomas—rose above the demand to represent or be represented, compromising nothing in their appeals for interracial collaboration and, above all, responding with optimism rather than cynicism to the surrounding culture’s preoccupation with color.

1971: A Year in the Life of Color

by Darby English

In this book, art historian Darby English explores the year 1971, when two exhibitions opened that brought modernist painting and sculpture into the burning heart of United States cultural politics: Contemporary Black Artists in America, at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and The DeLuxe Show, a racially integrated abstract art exhibition presented in a renovated movie theater in a Houston ghetto. 1971: A Year in the Life of Color looks at many black artists’ desire to gain freedom from overt racial representation, as well as their efforts—and those of their advocates—to further that aim through public exhibition. Amid calls to define a “black aesthetic,” these experiments with modernist art prioritized cultural interaction and instability. Contemporary Black Artists in America highlighted abstraction as a stance against normative approaches, while The DeLuxe Show positioned abstraction in a center of urban blight. The importance of these experiments, English argues, came partly from color’s special status as a cultural symbol and partly from investigations of color already under way in late modern art and criticism. With their supporters, black modernists—among them Peter Bradley, Frederick Eversley, Alvin Loving, Raymond Saunders, and Alma Thomas—rose above the demand to represent or be represented, compromising nothing in their appeals for interracial collaboration and, above all, responding with optimism rather than cynicism to the surrounding culture’s preoccupation with color.

1979: The Year That Shaped The Modern Middle East

by David W. Lesch

The Israeli-Palestinian peace process, the continuing US-Iraqi confrontation, the changing political dynamics in Iran, recent Pakistani-Indian hostilities and Osama bin Laden-all of these have one important common denominator: Significant strands of their origins can be traced to the tumultuous year of 1979. This text offers a new paradigm for stud

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