Browse Results

Showing 67,101 through 67,125 of 69,615 results

Photography and Its Publics

by Melissa Miles Edward Welch

Photography is a ubiquitous part of the public sphere. Yet we rarely stop to think about the important role that photography plays in helping to define what and who constitute the public.Photography and Its Publics brings together leading experts and emerging thinkers to consider the special role of photography in shaping how the public is addressed, seen and represented.This book responds to a growing body of recent scholarship and flourishing interest in photography's connections to the law, society, culture, politics, social change, the media and visual ethics.Photography and Its Publics presents the public sphere as a vibrant setting where these realms are produced, contested and entwined. Public spheres involve yet exceed the limits of families, interest groups, identities and communities. They are dymamic realms of visibility, discussion, reflection and possible conflict among strangers of different race, age, gender, social and economic status.Through studies of photography in South America, North America, Europe and Australasia, the contributors consider how photography has changed the way we understand and locate the public sphere. As they address key themes including the referential and imaginative qualities of photography, the transnational circulation of photographs, online publics, social change, violence, conflict and the ethics of spectatorship, the authors provide new insight into photography's vital role in defining public life.

Photography in India: From Archives to Contemporary Practice


Photography’s prominence in the representation and experience of India in contemporary and historical times has not guaranteed it a position of sustained attention in research and scholarship. For a technology as all pervasive as photography, and a country as colossal as India, this scenario is somewhat of an anomaly. Photography in India explores elements of the past, present and future of photography in the context of India through speculation and reflection on photography as an artistic, documentary and everyday practice. The perspectives of writers, theorists, curators and artists are selectively brought to bear upon known as well as previously unseen photographic archives, together with changes in photographic practice that have been synchronous with contemporary India’s rapid urban and rural transformation and the technological shift from chemistry and light to programming and algorithms. Essential reading for anyone interested in Indian photography, this book binds insights into a history of photography with its contemporary development, consolidating wide-ranging thinking on the topic and setting the agenda for future research.

Photography in India: From Archives to Contemporary Practice

by Aileen Blaney

Photography’s prominence in the representation and experience of India in contemporary and historical times has not guaranteed it a position of sustained attention in research and scholarship. For a technology as all pervasive as photography, and a country as colossal as India, this scenario is somewhat of an anomaly. Photography in India explores elements of the past, present and future of photography in the context of India through speculation and reflection on photography as an artistic, documentary and everyday practice. The perspectives of writers, theorists, curators and artists are selectively brought to bear upon known as well as previously unseen photographic archives, together with changes in photographic practice that have been synchronous with contemporary India’s rapid urban and rural transformation and the technological shift from chemistry and light to programming and algorithms. Essential reading for anyone interested in Indian photography, this book binds insights into a history of photography with its contemporary development, consolidating wide-ranging thinking on the topic and setting the agenda for future research.

Physical Intelligence: The Science of Thinking Without Thinking

by Scott Grafton

'An instant classic' Michael S. Gazzaniga, author of The Consciousness InstinctWhat is it that stops us from walking into walls or off cliffs? How do you pick the right moment to cross a busy road Or decide if you can drive through a storm? What helps you discover a shortcut to a familiar route?The answer is PHYSICAL INTELLIGENCESometimes, you need to do it to know it. Your hands have to be on the steering wheel to learn the feel of slipping tyres. You need to be watching the traffic to judge the best moment to cross the road. Everything we do, from changing a lightbulb to navigating unknown terrain relies on physical intelligence, our oldest and most important form of cognition. Physical intelligence was the key development in human evolution; thinking evolved first and foremost so we could do things. It has been the key to our survival against all the odds for so long that it has become instinctive, and continues to underpin our every action, from the ordinary (walking down a street) to the extraordinary (winning a race) and beyond. Renowned neuroscientist, doctor and keen climber, Scott Grafton was fascinated to discover how physical intelligence's most important components were laid bare, away from civilisation. In this book he takes you on a journey to explore the hidden depths of this silent, ruthless intellect we all possess. Drawing on the latest scientific discoveries and research, experiences with patients, and Professor Grafton's own gripping stories of survival in the wilderness, Physical Intelligence explains the science behind our most overlooked ability and takes a fascinating and vital look at how we could and should use it better.

Physikdidaktik | Grundlagen


Im vorliegenden Buch präsentieren die Autorinnen und Autoren die Grundlagen der Physikdidaktik – von den Zielen und Kompetenzen im Unterricht über die Unterrichtsgestaltung zu Experimenten und zur Nutzung von digitalen Medien. Auch Alltagsvorstellungen, die Sprache im Physikunterricht, das Erklären, das Konzipieren von Aufgaben sowie Diagnostik und Leistungsbeurteilung werden thematisiert. In der Neuauflage wurde das Standardwerk Physikdidaktik aktualisiert und um weitere Kapitel ergänzt. Thematisch getrennt wird es jetzt in den zwei Bänden Grundlagen und Methoden und Inhalte angeboten. Die beiden Bände richten sich an Studierende des Lehramts Physik, angehende Lehrkräfte in der Ausbildung und Physiklehrerinnen und -lehrer. Es erschließt nicht nur fundiertes Wissen über die Physikdidaktik, sondern gibt auch Hilfestellungen, Physikunterricht vorzubereiten und durchzuführen.Aus dem InhaltÜberblick über Grundlagen und Ziele der PhysikdidaktikElementarisierung, Unterrichtsmethoden und Gestaltung von UnterrichtExperimente, klassische und digitale Medien Alltagsvorstellungen zu physikalischen ThemenSprache und Erklären im PhysikunterrichtPhysikaufgaben und DiagnostikPhysikalische Fachkonzepte in der Primarstufe anbahnen

Physikdidaktik | Methoden und Inhalte

by Ernst Kircher Raimund Girwidz Hans E. Fischer

Das vorliegende Buch bietet den Leserinnen und Lesern einen fundierten Überblick über die Methoden der Physikdidaktik und bietet eine Hilfestellung, hochspannende Themen in den Physikunterricht einzubinden. In Einzelbeiträgen diskutieren Autorinnen und Autoren Methoden und Inhalte der Physikdidaktik – angefangen von der qualitativen Forschung in der Fachdidaktik über Aus- und Fortbildungen von Physiklehrerinnen und -lehrern zur Professionskompetenz und Nature of Science. Daran anschließend werden aktuelle und forschungsnahe Themengebiete und ihre mögliche Einbindung in den Unterricht dargestellt: Bio-, Quanten-, Nano- und Elementarteilchenphysik, Astronomie, Chaos, Physik des Klimawandels und die Physik der Gravitationswellen. Das Standardwerk Physikdidaktik wird in der Neuauflage thematisch getrennt angeboten: Grundlagen und Methoden und Inhalte. Beide Bände richten sich an Studierende des Lehramts Physik, angehende Lehrkräfte im Vorbereitungsdienst und Physiklehrerinnen und -lehrer.

Picturing Political Power: Images in the Women’s Suffrage Movement

by Allison K. Lange

For as long as women have battled for equitable political representation in America, those battles have been defined by images—whether illustrations, engravings, photographs, or colorful chromolithograph posters. Some of these pictures have been flattering, many have been condescending, and others downright incendiary. They have drawn upon prevailing cultural ideas of women’s perceived roles and abilities and often have been circulated with pointedly political objectives. Picturing Political Power offers perhaps the most comprehensive analysis yet of the connection between images, gender, and power. In this examination of the fights that led to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920, Allison K. Lange explores how suffragists pioneered one of the first extensive visual campaigns in modern American history. She shows how pictures, from early engravings and photographs to colorful posters, proved central to suffragists’ efforts to change expectations for women, fighting back against the accepted norms of their times. In seeking to transform notions of womanhood and win the right to vote, white suffragists emphasized the compatibility of voting and motherhood, while Sojourner Truth and other leading suffragists of color employed pictures to secure respect and authority. Picturing Political Power demonstrates the centrality of visual politics to American women’s campaigns throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, revealing the power of images to change history.

Picturing Political Power: Images in the Women’s Suffrage Movement

by Allison K. Lange

For as long as women have battled for equitable political representation in America, those battles have been defined by images—whether illustrations, engravings, photographs, or colorful chromolithograph posters. Some of these pictures have been flattering, many have been condescending, and others downright incendiary. They have drawn upon prevailing cultural ideas of women’s perceived roles and abilities and often have been circulated with pointedly political objectives. Picturing Political Power offers perhaps the most comprehensive analysis yet of the connection between images, gender, and power. In this examination of the fights that led to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920, Allison K. Lange explores how suffragists pioneered one of the first extensive visual campaigns in modern American history. She shows how pictures, from early engravings and photographs to colorful posters, proved central to suffragists’ efforts to change expectations for women, fighting back against the accepted norms of their times. In seeking to transform notions of womanhood and win the right to vote, white suffragists emphasized the compatibility of voting and motherhood, while Sojourner Truth and other leading suffragists of color employed pictures to secure respect and authority. Picturing Political Power demonstrates the centrality of visual politics to American women’s campaigns throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, revealing the power of images to change history.

Pilgrimage and England's Cathedrals: Past, Present, and Future

by John Jenkins Dee Dyas

"A brilliant breakthrough in pilgrimage studies. An exemplary study that shows how to bring together different academic and institutional interests in a common cause – understanding the relationship between pilgrimage and English cathedrals over time. A publication that will, hopefully, inspire similar collaborative studies around the globe."- John Eade, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Roehampton, UK"People who oversee, minister, lead worship, guide, welcome, manage, market, promote and maintain cathedrals will find this book an indispensable treasure. It is aware of the awesome complexity inherent in cathedral life but it doesn’t duck the issues: its clear-eyed focus is on the way people experience cathedrals and how these extraordinary holy places can speak and connect with all the diversity represented by the people who come to them. In a spiritually-hungry age, this book shows us how to recognise and meet that hunger. This book will be required reading for all us “insiders” trying to invite and signpost access to holy ground."- The Very Reverend Adrian Dorber, Dean of Lichfield, Chair of the Association of English CathedralsThis book looks at England's cathedrals and their relationship with pilgrimage throughout history and in the present day. The volume brings together historians, social scientists, and cathedral practitioners to provide groundbreaking work, comprising a historical overview of the topic, thematic studies, and individual views from prominent clergy discussing how they see pilgrimage as part of the contemporary cathedral experience.

The Pink Line: Journeys Across the World's Queer Frontiers

by Mark Gevisser

The Pink Line is not just necessary reading for those who care about justice, it ought to be mandatory.’ –Sisonke Msimang, author of Always Another Country ‘This is politics and poetry all at once. The Pink Line is a remarkable narrative of resilience, romance, and realism.’ –Homi K. Bhabha, author of The Location of Culture ‘Hugely ambitious and brilliantly executed, it is an engrossing and essential read.’ –Jonny Steinberg, author of One Day in BethlehemHow did “LGBT Rights” become a dividing line across the world, bringing new freedoms and creating new fears? And what impact has it had on the people who live along this new global frontier?Over seven years, Mark Gevisser has followed protagonists from across the world to tell one of the most startling stories of the 21st century: how a new conversation about sexual orientation has come to divide – and describe – the world in an entirely new way. While same-sex marriage and gender transition are celebrated in some parts of the world, laws are being strengthened to criminalize homosexuality and gender nonconformity in others. As globalized queer identities are adopted by people across the world – thanks in large part to the digital revolution – fresh culture wars have emerged. A new Pink Line, Gevisser argues, has been drawn across the globe, and he takes readers to its frontiers.In between sharp analytical chapters exploring identity politics, religion, folklore, gender ideology, capitalism, human rights, and geopolitics, Gevisser provides sensitive and sometimes startling profiles of the queer folk he’s encountered along the Pink Line. They include a trans Malawian refugee granted asylum in South Africa, a lesbian couple campaigning for countrywide marriage equality in Mexico, genderqueer high schoolers coming of age in Michigan, a gay Israeli-Palestinian couple searching for common ground, and a community of kothis – “women’s hearts in men’s bodies” – who run a temple in an Indian fishing village. What results is a moving and multifaceted picture of the world today and the queer people defining it.Eye-opening, expertly researched, and compellingly narrated, The Pink Line is a monumental – and urgent – journey of unprecedented scope into 21st-century identity, seen through the border posts along the world’s new LGBTQ+ frontiers.

Place, Alterity, and Narration in a Taiwanese Catholic Village (Asian Christianity in the Diaspora)

by Marco Lazzarotti

This book introduces a simple idea: when we tell a story, we tell a story and at the same time create the world where this story takes place. Narration creates environments, spaces and, in a certain sense, gives symbolic meanings and values to the identities by which people interact in their daily experiences. Set in the multicultural and multireligious Taiwanese environment, this book describes the interactions, and above all the narrations, linked to a Catholic village located in the Taiwanese countryside. Catholicism in Taiwan is a minor religion (around 2% of the population), and considered a foreign and heterodox religion, something different and "other" from the Taiwanese mainstream religious environment. It is this sense of alterity that creates the stories about this place and, as a consequence, creates this place and its special identity.

Place-based Learning for the Plate: Hunting, Foraging and Fishing for Food (Environmental Discourses in Science Education #6)

by Michael P. Mueller David Greenwood Joel B. Pontius

This edited volume explores 21st century stories of hunting, foraging, and fishing for food as unique forms of place-based learning. Through the authors’ narratives, it reveals complex social and ecological relationships while readers sample the flavors of foraging in Portland, Oregon; feel some of what it’s like to grow up hunting and gathering as a person of Oglala Lakota and Shoshone-Bannock descent; track the immersive process of learning to communicate with rocky mountain elk; encounter a road-killed deer as a spontaneous source of local meat, and more.Other topics in the collection connect place, food, and learning to issues of identity, activism, spirituality, food movements, conservation, traditional and elder knowledge, and the ethics related to eating the more-than-human world. This volume will bring lively discussion to courses on place-based learning, food studies, environmental education, outdoor recreation, experiential education, holistic learning, human dimensions of natural resource management, sustainability, food systems, environmental ethics, and others.

A Place For Everything: The Curious History of Alphabetical Order

by Judith Flanders

'Marvellous...I read it with astonished delight..It is equally scholarly and entertaining.' Jan Morris 'Delightfully quirky and compelling' The Sunday Times One we've learned it as children few of us think much of the alphabet and its familiar sing-song order. And yet the order if the alphabet, that simple knowledge that we take for granted, plays a major role in our adult lives. From the school register to the telephone book, from dictionaries and encyclopaedias to library shelves, our lives are ordered from A to Z. Long before Google searches, this magical system of organisation gave us the ability to sift through centuries of thought, knowledge and literature, allowing us to sort, to file, and to find the information we have, and to locate the information we need. In A PLACE FOR EVERYTHING, acclaimed historian Judith Flanders draws our attention to both the neglected ubiquity of the alphabet and the long, complex history of its rise to prominence. For, while the order of the alphabet itself became fixed very soon after letters were first invented, their ability to sort and store and organize proved far less obvious. To many of our forebears, the idea of of organising things by the random chance of the alphabet rather than by established systems of hierarchy or typology lay somewhere between unthinkable and disrespectful.A PLACE FOR EVERYTHING fascinatingly lays out the gradual triumph of alphabetical order, from its possible earliest days as a sorting tool in the Great Library of Alexandria in the third century BCE, to its current decline in prominence in our digital age of Wikipedia and Google. Along the way, the reader is enlightened and entertained with a wonderful cast of unknown facts, characters and stories from the great collector Robert Cotton, who denominated his manuscripts with the names of the busts of the Roman emperors surmounting his book cases, to the unassuming sixteenth- century London bookseller who ushered in a revolution by listing his authors by 'sirname' first.

Placemaking Fundamentals for the Built Environment

by Dominique Hes Cristina Hernandez-Santin

This book is for all those actively working in the built environment. It presents the latest theory and practice of engaging with stakeholders to co-design, develop and manage thriving places. It starts from the importance of integrating design of nature into practice built on a foundation of First Nations understanding of place. The art of engagement of community, government and the development industry is discussed with reference to case studies and best practice techniques. The book then focuses on the critical role placemaking has in supporting resilience and adaptability of communities and looks at issues of leadership and governance. Building on these steps for placemaking, the last parts of the book address economics, evaluation, digital and art based tools and approaches to support projects that aim to create an engaged, contributive, collaborative and active citizen.

Placemaking Sandbox: Emergent Approaches, Techniques and Practices to Create More Thriving Places

by Iderlina Mateo-Babiano Kelum Palipane

Placemaking Sandbox offers a valuable collection of placemaking case studies, designed for teachers and students to build expertise in shaping and creating thriving public places. Each chapter outlines the latest research and practice underpinning placemaking pedagogical approaches, with specialist authors developing and interrogating methodological techniques and reflecting on current teaching and research. By taking a hands-on and experimental look at emergent practices, pedagogies and methods in placemaking across different contexts, this book will help deepen understandings on how to wrestle with complex conditions generated by place. In Placemaking Sandbox contributors skillfully tackle a little researched topic on the pedagogy of place and placemaking, and in the process offer a distinctive bridge between academia and practice.

Plague Years: A Doctor’s Journey through the AIDS Crisis

by Ross A. Slotten, MD

In 1992, Dr. Ross A. Slotten signed more death certificates in Chicago—and, by inference, the state of Illinois—than anyone else. As a family physician, he was trained to care for patients from birth to death, but when he completed his residency in 1984, he had no idea that many of his future patients would be cut down in the prime of their lives. Among those patients were friends, colleagues, and lovers, shunned by most of the medical community because they were gay and HIV positive. Slotten wasn’t an infectious disease specialist, but because of his unique position as both a gay man and a young physician, he became an unlikely pioneer, swept up in one of the worst epidemics in modern history. Plague Years is an unprecedented first-person account of that epidemic, spanning not just the city of Chicago but four continents as well. Slotten provides an intimate yet comprehensive view of the disease’s spread alongside heartfelt portraits of his patients and his own conflicted feelings as a medical professional, drawn from more than thirty years of personal notebooks. In telling the story of someone who was as much a potential patient as a doctor, Plague Years sheds light on the darkest hours in the history of the LGBT community in ways that no previous medical memoir has.

Plague Years: A Doctor’s Journey through the AIDS Crisis

by Ross A. Slotten, MD

In 1992, Dr. Ross A. Slotten signed more death certificates in Chicago—and, by inference, the state of Illinois—than anyone else. As a family physician, he was trained to care for patients from birth to death, but when he completed his residency in 1984, he had no idea that many of his future patients would be cut down in the prime of their lives. Among those patients were friends, colleagues, and lovers, shunned by most of the medical community because they were gay and HIV positive. Slotten wasn’t an infectious disease specialist, but because of his unique position as both a gay man and a young physician, he became an unlikely pioneer, swept up in one of the worst epidemics in modern history. Plague Years is an unprecedented first-person account of that epidemic, spanning not just the city of Chicago but four continents as well. Slotten provides an intimate yet comprehensive view of the disease’s spread alongside heartfelt portraits of his patients and his own conflicted feelings as a medical professional, drawn from more than thirty years of personal notebooks. In telling the story of someone who was as much a potential patient as a doctor, Plague Years sheds light on the darkest hours in the history of the LGBT community in ways that no previous medical memoir has.

Planning for Resilience: New Paths for Managing Uncertainty (SpringerBriefs in Geography)

by Elena Pede

Given the increasing uncertainty due to catastrophic climate events, terrorist attacks, and economic crises, this book addresses planning for resilience by focusing on sharing knowledge among policy-makers, urban planners, emergency teams and citizens. Chapters look at the nature of contemporary risks, the widespread of resilience thinking and the gap between the theoretical conception and the practices. The book explores how resilience implies a change in planning practices, highlighting the need for flexibility in terms of procedures, and for dynamism in the knowledge systems and learning processes that are the main tools for interaction among different actors and scales. Given its breadth of coverage, the book offers a valuable resource for both academic readers (spatial planners, geographers, social scientists) and practitioners (policymakers, citizens’ associations).

Platform Capitalism in India (Global Transformations in Media and Communication Research - A Palgrave and IAMCR Series)

by Adrian Athique Vibodh Parthasarathi

This volume provides a critical examination of the evolution of platform economies in India. Contributions from leading media and communications scholars present case studies that illustrate the social and economic ambitions at the heart of Digital India. Across interdisciplinary domains of business, labour, politics, and culture, this book examines how digital platforms are embedding automated systems into the social fabrics of everyday life. Encouraging readers to explore the phenomenon of platformisation in context, the book uncovers the distinctive features of platform capitalism in India.

Platform Urbanism: Negotiating Platform Ecosystems in Connected Cities (Geographies of Media)

by Sarah Barns

This book reflects on what it means to live as urban citizens in a world increasingly shaped by the business and organisational logics of digital platforms. Where smart city strategies promote the roll-out of internet of things (IoT) technologies and big data analytics by city governments worldwide, platform urbanism responds to the deep and pervasive entanglements that exist between urban citizens, city services and platform ecosystems today. Recent years have witnessed a backlash against major global platforms, evidenced by burgeoning literatures on platform capitalism, the platform society, platform surveillance and platform governance, as well as regulatory attention towards the market power of platforms in their dominance of global data infrastructure. This book responds to these developments and asks: How do platform ecosystems reshape connected cities? How do urban researchers and policy makers respond to the logics of platform ecosystems and platform intermediation? What sorts of multisensory urban engagements are rendered through platform interfaces and modalities? And what sorts of governance challenges and responses are needed to cultivate and champion the digital public spaces of our connected lives.

Platforms, Protests, and the Challenge of Networked Democracy (Rhetoric, Politics and Society)

by John Jones Michael Trice

This book examines the recent evolution of online spaces and their impact on networked democracy. Through an illuminating mix of theoretical and methodological analysis, contributors provide an understanding of how a range of individuals and groups, including activists and NGOs, governments and griefers, are using digital technologies to influence public debates. Contributions consider these phenomena in a global contemporary context, providing within the same volume rigorous examinations of the design of digital platforms for deliberation, users’ attempts to manipulate those platforms, and the ways activists and governments are responding to emerging threats to democratic discourse. Providing diverse, global case studies, this collection is a valuable tool for academics within and beyond the fields of new media, communication, and information policy and governance.

Playful Participatory Practices: Theoretical and Methodological Reflections (Perspektiven der Game Studies)

by Benjamin Beil Pablo Abend Vanessa Ossa

The volume addresses the matter of participatory media practices as playful appropriations within current digital media culture and artistic research. The aim is to explore and trace the shifting boundaries between media production and media use, and to develop concepts and methodologies that work within participatory media cultures. Therefore the articles explore and establish nuanced approaches to the oftentimes playful practices associated with the appropriation of technology.

The Playful Undead and Video Games: Critical Analyses of Zombies and Gameplay (Routledge Advances in Game Studies)

by Peter Zackariasson Stephen J. Webley

This book explores the central role of the zombie in contemporary popular culture as they appear in video games. Moving beyond traditional explanations of their enduring appeal – that they embody an aesthetic that combines horror with a mindless target; that lower age ratings for zombie games widen the market; or that Artificial Intelligence routines for zombies are easier to develop – the book provides a multidisciplinary and comprehensive look at this cultural phenomenon. Drawing on detailed case studies from across the genre, contributors from a variety of backgrounds offer insights into how the study of zombies in the context of video games informs an analysis of their impact on contemporary popular culture. Issues such as gender, politics, intellectual property law, queer theory, narrative storytelling and worldbuilding, videogame techniques and technology, and man’s relation to monsters are closely examined in their relation to zombie video games. Breaking new ground in the study of video games and popular culture, this volume will be of interest to researchers in a broad range of areas including media, popular culture, video games, and media psychology.

The Playful Undead and Video Games: Critical Analyses of Zombies and Gameplay (Routledge Advances in Game Studies)

by Peter Zackariasson Stephen J. Webley

This book explores the central role of the zombie in contemporary popular culture as they appear in video games. Moving beyond traditional explanations of their enduring appeal – that they embody an aesthetic that combines horror with a mindless target; that lower age ratings for zombie games widen the market; or that Artificial Intelligence routines for zombies are easier to develop – the book provides a multidisciplinary and comprehensive look at this cultural phenomenon. Drawing on detailed case studies from across the genre, contributors from a variety of backgrounds offer insights into how the study of zombies in the context of video games informs an analysis of their impact on contemporary popular culture. Issues such as gender, politics, intellectual property law, queer theory, narrative storytelling and worldbuilding, videogame techniques and technology, and man’s relation to monsters are closely examined in their relation to zombie video games. Breaking new ground in the study of video games and popular culture, this volume will be of interest to researchers in a broad range of areas including media, popular culture, video games, and media psychology.

The Pleasure Gap: American Women and the Unfinished Sexual Revolution

by Katherine Rowland

American culture is more sexually liberal than ever. But compared to men, women's sexual pleasure has not grown: Up to 40 percent of American women experience the sexual malaise clinically known as low sexual desire. Between this low desire, muted pleasure, and experiencing sex in terms of labor rather than of lust, women by the millions are dissatisfied with their erotic lives. For too long, this deficit has been explained in terms of women's biology, stress, and age. In The Pleasure Gap, Katherine Rowland rejects the idea that women should settle for diminished pleasure; instead, she argues women should take inequality in the bedroom as seriously as we take it in the workplace and understand its causes and effects. Drawing on extensive research and interviews with more than one hundred women and dozens of sexual health professionals, Rowland shows that the pleasure gap is neither medical malady nor psychological condition but rather a result of our culture's troubled relationship with women's sexual expression. This provocative exploration of modern sexuality makes a case for closing the gap for good.

Refine Search

Showing 67,101 through 67,125 of 69,615 results