Browse Results

Showing 16,176 through 16,200 of 16,447 results

After the Final Whistle: The First Rugby World Cup and the First World War

by Stephen Cooper Jason Leonard

As Britain’s Empire went to war in August 1914, rugby players were the first to volunteer. They led from the front and paid a disproportionate price. In 1919, a grateful Mother Country hosted a rugby tournament: sevens teams at eight venues, playing 17 matches to declare a first ‘world champion’. There had never been an international team tournament like it. For the first time teams from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa, Britain and France were assembled in one place. Rugby held the first ever ‘World Cup’. It was a moment of triumph, a celebration of military victory, of Commonwealth and Allied unity, and of rugby values, moral and physical. In 2019 the modern Rugby World Cup moves to Japan in the Centenary of the King’s Cup. With a foreword by Jason Leonard, this is the story of rugby’s journey through the First World War to its first World Cup, and how those values endure today. 'After The Final Whistle' was shortlisted for the 2016 Cross Sports Book of the Year award.

After the Dresden Bombing: Pathways of Memory, 1945 to the Present (Palgrave Macmillan Memory Studies)

by A. Fuchs

Anne Fuchs traces the aftermath of the Dresden bombing in the collective imagination from 1945 to today. As a case study of an event that gained local, national and global iconicity, the book investigates the role of photography, fine art, architecture, literature and film in dialogue with the changing German socio-political landscape.

After the Armistice: Empire, Endgame and Aftermath (Routledge Studies in First World War History)

by Michael J. K. Walsh; Andrekos Varnava

A century after the Armistice and the associated peace agreements that formally ended the Great War, many issues pertaining to the UK and its empire are yet to be satisfactorily resolved. Accordingly, this volume presents a multi-disciplinary approach to better understanding the post-Armistice Empire across a broad spectrum of disciplines, geographies and chronologies. Through the lens of diplomatic, social, cultural, historical and economic analysis, the chapters engage with the histories of Lagos and Tonga, Cyprus and China, as well as more obvious geographies of empire such as Ireland, India and Australia. Though globally diverse, and encompassing much of the post-Armistice century, the studies are nevertheless united by three common themes: the interrogation of that transitionary ‘moment’ after the Armistice that lingered well beyond the final Treaty of Lausanne in 1924; the utilisation of new research methods and avenues of enquiry to compliment extant debates concerning the legacies of colonialism and nationalism; and the common leitmotif of the British Empire in all its political and cultural complexity. The centenary of the Armistice offers a timely occasion on which to present these studies.

After the Armistice: Empire, Endgame and Aftermath (Routledge Studies in First World War History)

by Andrekos Varnava Michael J. K. Walsh

A century after the Armistice and the associated peace agreements that formally ended the Great War, many issues pertaining to the UK and its empire are yet to be satisfactorily resolved. Accordingly, this volume presents a multi-disciplinary approach to better understanding the post-Armistice Empire across a broad spectrum of disciplines, geographies and chronologies. Through the lens of diplomatic, social, cultural, historical and economic analysis, the chapters engage with the histories of Lagos and Tonga, Cyprus and China, as well as more obvious geographies of empire such as Ireland, India and Australia. Though globally diverse, and encompassing much of the post-Armistice century, the studies are nevertheless united by three common themes: the interrogation of that transitionary ‘moment’ after the Armistice that lingered well beyond the final Treaty of Lausanne in 1924; the utilisation of new research methods and avenues of enquiry to compliment extant debates concerning the legacies of colonialism and nationalism; and the common leitmotif of the British Empire in all its political and cultural complexity. The centenary of the Armistice offers a timely occasion on which to present these studies.

After The Storm: The Changing Military Balance in the Middle East (History and Politics in the 20th Century: Bloomsbury Academic)

by Anthony H. Cordesman

This comprehensive analysis documents the military forces in each Middle Eastern country at the end of the Cold War. Cordesman discusses security developments and provides a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the strength and effectiveness of every army, navy, air force, and air defence force in the region. He further assesses post-Cold War modernization and expansions plans and each country's internal security situations, the role the military plays in its government and internal tensions and civil wars. Special attention is paid to Iran and Iraq and the author examines the military changes in both countries as responses to the Iran-Iraq and the First Gulf War.After the Storm is unique in combining the evaluation of conventional forces with assessments of developments in biological, chemical and nuclear weapons and provides a coherent picture of the state of the military in the Middle East in the early 1990s. Summary tables and charts present keys statistics for the region, formatted to allow quick country by country comparisons.

After The Holocaust: Jewish Survivors in Germany after 1945

by Eva Kolinsky

After the Holocaust tells the story of life after liberation from the perspective of Jewish survivors working to rebuild their lives. Since there was no plan for liberation - no structure in place to help survivors settle once they were liberated - these testimonies speak of struggle amid confusion and pain. Ambiguous regulations aimed to repatriate displaced Jews and to confine them to camps were put forth while the classification of German Jews as Germans without entitlement to additional food rations or other support were also put in place. Thus, the normalisation of Jewish life after 1945 amounted to abandonment. And as Germans busied themselves with their own 'catastrophe' of defeat and with the reconstruction of German culture, Jews were left to depend on military and Jewish aid agencies, all pursuing their own, often conflicting, agendas. Jewish culture since the Holocaust incorporates the traumatic memory of the Holocaust as a collective and an individual experience. Yet it also incorporates the memory of how after liberation, Germans remained divided from Jews in their mutual struggle to re-build their lives.

After Daybreak: The Liberation of Belsen, 1945

by Ben Shephard

'The things I saw completely defy description': when British troops entered Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in April 1945, they uncovered scenes of horror and depravity that shocked the world. But they also confronted a terrible challenge - inside the camp were some 60,000 people, suffering from typhus, starvation and dysentery, who would die unless they received immediate medical attention.After Daybreak is the story of the men and women who faced that challenge - the army stretcher-bearers and ambulance drivers, medical students and relief workers who worked to save the inmates of Belsen - with the war still raging and only the most primitive drugs and facilities available. It was, for all of them, an overwhelming experience. Drawing on their diaries and letters, Ben Shephard reconstructs events at Belsen in the spring of 1945 - from the first horror of its discovery, through the agonising process of trying to save the survivors, to the point where Belsen became 'more like a Butlin's Holiday camp than a concentration one'. By the end of June 1945, some 46,000 people had survived at Belsen; but another 14,000 had been lost. Should we therefore see the relief of the camp as an epic of medical heroism - as the British believed? Or was the failure to plan for Belsen and the undoubted mistakes that were made there further evidence of Allied indifference to the fate of Europe's Jews - as some historians now argue? After Daybreak is a powerful and dramatic narrative, full of extraordinary incidents and characters. It is also an important contribution to medical history.

After The Bomb: Civil Defence and Nuclear War in Britain, 1945-68

by M. Grant

Civil defence was an integral part of Britain's modern history. Throughout the cold war it was a central response of the British Government to the threat of war. This book will be the first history of the preparations to fight a nuclear war taken in Britain between the end of the Second World War and 1968.

After (Once/now/then/after Ser. (PDF))

by Morris Gleitzman

Following a heartbreaking struggle to survive as a Jewish child in Germany, Felix faces perhaps his greatest challenge - to find hope when he's lost almost everything. As Europe goes through the final agonizing stages of the war, Felix struggles to reconcile hatred and healing. He's helped by a new friend, but if he should lose her as well . . .

Afrikakorps Soldier 1941–43 (Warrior #149)

by Pier Paolo Battistelli Mr Raffaele Ruggeri

This book explores the experiences of the German Afrikakorps soldier during the North Africa campaign, from the Korps' arrival in–theatre in February 1941 to its eventual surrender in Tunisia in May 1943, with a particular focus on the intense period of warfare in the Western Desert between 1941 and 1942. Under the leadership of one of the war's most famous commanders, Erwin Rommel, the Afrikakorps grew to include a broad range of armour, infantry, artillery, anti-tank, engineer, communications, supply, medical and service elements. The soldiers of the Afrikakorps considered themselves as part of an elite, a highly select group that had no equal, not only in the German Army, but in the rest of the world.

Afrikakorps Soldier 1941–43 (Warrior)

by Pier Paolo Battistelli Raffaele Ruggeri

This book explores the experiences of the German Afrikakorps soldier during the North Africa campaign, from the Korps' arrival in–theatre in February 1941 to its eventual surrender in Tunisia in May 1943, with a particular focus on the intense period of warfare in the Western Desert between 1941 and 1942. Under the leadership of one of the war's most famous commanders, Erwin Rommel, the Afrikakorps grew to include a broad range of armour, infantry, artillery, anti-tank, engineer, communications, supply, medical and service elements. The soldiers of the Afrikakorps considered themselves as part of an elite, a highly select group that had no equal, not only in the German Army, but in the rest of the world.

Afrikakorps 1941–43 (Elite)

by Ronald Volstad Gordon Williamson

The campaign in North Africa between September 1940 and May 1943 holds not only an enduring fascination for postwar generations; but also a perhaps unique degree of nostalgia for some surviving participants. The campaign was no less costly in terms of human lives and material than many others; but regret at the cost is accompanied by positive memories in the minds of many veterans. This is not to suggest that the dead have been forgotten; but an almost mystical bond nevertheless exists, even between former enemies, amongst veterans of the desert campaign. Gordon Williamson examines the history, organisation and uniforms of Rommel's Afrikakorps.

Afrikakorps 1941–43 (Elite #34)

by Gordon Williamson

The campaign in North Africa between September 1940 and May 1943 holds not only an enduring fascination for postwar generations; but also a perhaps unique degree of nostalgia for some surviving participants. The campaign was no less costly in terms of human lives and material than many others; but regret at the cost is accompanied by positive memories in the minds of many veterans. This is not to suggest that the dead have been forgotten; but an almost mystical bond nevertheless exists, even between former enemies, amongst veterans of the desert campaign. Gordon Williamson examines the history, organisation and uniforms of Rommel's Afrikakorps.

The Afrika Reich: A Novel

by Guy Saville

What if Dunkirk had been the end of Britain's war against the Nazis?'Fatherland for an action movie age.' Daily Telegraph1952. It is more than a decade since humiliation at Dunkirk brought an end to Britain's war and the beginning of an uneasy peace with Hitler.In Africa, the swastika flies from the Sahara to the Indian Ocean. Gleaming autobahns bisect the jungle, jet fighters patrol the skies. The brutal presence of the SS is visible everywhere. Now, however, the demonic plans of Walter Hochburg - architect of Nazi Africa - threaten Britain's ailing colonies.In England, ex-mercenary Burton Cole is offered one last contract. Burton jumps at the chance to settle an old score with Hochburg, despite the protests of the woman he loves. If Burton fails, unimaginable horrors will be unleashed in Africa. No one - black or white - will be spared.But when his mission turns to disaster, Burton is forced to flee for his life. His flight takes him from the unholy killing ground of Kongo to SS slave camps and on to war-torn Angola, finally reaching its thrilling climax in a conspiracy that leads to the dark heart of the Afrika Reich itself.Guy Saville combines meticulous research with edge-of-the seat suspense to produce a superb novel of alternate history.

Africans in Britain

by David Killingray

This collection of essays looks at the history of African people in Britain mainly over the past 200 years

Africans in Britain

by David Killingray

This collection of essays looks at the history of African people in Britain mainly over the past 200 years

Africans and the Holocaust: Perceptions and Responses of Colonized and Sovereign Peoples (Routledge Studies in the Modern History of Africa)

by Edward Kissi

This book is an original and comparative study of reactions in West and East Africa to the persecution and attempted annihilation of Jews in Europe and in former German colonies in sub-Saharan Africa during the Second World War.An intellectual and diplomatic history of World War II and the Holocaust, Africans and the Holocaust looks at the period from the perspectives of the colonized subjects of the Gold Coast, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Kenya, Tanganyika, and Uganda, as well as the sovereign peoples of Liberia and Ethiopia, who wrestled with the social and moral questions that the war and the Holocaust raised. The five main chapters of the book explore the pre-Holocaust history of relations between Jews and Africans in West and East Africa, perceptions of Nazism in both regions, opinions of World War II, interpretations of the Holocaust, and responses of the colonized and sovereign peoples of West and East Africa to efforts by Great Britain to resettle certain categories of Jewish refugees from Europe in the two regions before and during the Holocaust.This book will be of use to students and scholars of African history, Holocaust and Jewish studies, and international or global history.

Africans and the Holocaust: Perceptions and Responses of Colonized and Sovereign Peoples (Routledge Studies in the Modern History of Africa)

by Edward Kissi

This book is an original and comparative study of reactions in West and East Africa to the persecution and attempted annihilation of Jews in Europe and in former German colonies in sub-Saharan Africa during the Second World War.An intellectual and diplomatic history of World War II and the Holocaust, Africans and the Holocaust looks at the period from the perspectives of the colonized subjects of the Gold Coast, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Kenya, Tanganyika, and Uganda, as well as the sovereign peoples of Liberia and Ethiopia, who wrestled with the social and moral questions that the war and the Holocaust raised. The five main chapters of the book explore the pre-Holocaust history of relations between Jews and Africans in West and East Africa, perceptions of Nazism in both regions, opinions of World War II, interpretations of the Holocaust, and responses of the colonized and sovereign peoples of West and East Africa to efforts by Great Britain to resettle certain categories of Jewish refugees from Europe in the two regions before and during the Holocaust.This book will be of use to students and scholars of African history, Holocaust and Jewish studies, and international or global history.

An African Story (A Roald Dahl Short Story)

by Roald Dahl

An African Story is a short, gripping story of life in wartime from Roald Dahl, the master of the shocking tale.In An African Story, Roald Dahl, one of the world's favourite authors, tells us the twisted tale of the dog killer, the missing milk, the old man and the snake.An African Story is taken from the short story collection Over to You, which includes nine other dramatic and terrifying tales of life as a wartime fighter pilot, and is drawn from Dahl's own experiences during the Second World War.This story is also available as a Penguin digital audio download read by Cillian Murphy.Roald Dahl, the brilliant and worldwide acclaimed author of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, James and the Giant Peach, Matilda, and many more classics for children, also wrote scores of short stories for adults. These delightfully disturbing tales have often been filmed and were most recently the inspiration for the West End play, Roald Dahl's Twisted Tales by Jeremy Dyson. Roald Dahl's stories continue to make readers shiver today.

African and Afro-Caribbean Repatriation, 1919–1922: Black Voices

by Jane L. Chapman

This book is the first attempt to analyse records of people of Afro-Caribbean origin who appealed against repatriation during the painful period after Britain’s 1919 race riots. Revealing personal letters and petitions from the West Indies, West Africa, and the UK, Jane Chapman demonstrates that conflict adjustment involving individual voices needs to be highlighted. She asks, what was the human environment, the dilemmas and the racist compulsions making transnational experiences in the British Empire so poignant? Analysing both the opinions of civil servants on appellants’ statements of hardship and requests for financial help, and the voices of the appellants themselves, this book aims to rediscover black people’s hidden heritage.

African and Afro-Caribbean Repatriation, 1919–1922: Black Voices

by Jane L. Chapman

This book is the first attempt to analyse records of people of Afro-Caribbean origin who appealed against repatriation during the painful period after Britain’s 1919 race riots. Revealing personal letters and petitions from the West Indies, West Africa, and the UK, Jane Chapman demonstrates that conflict adjustment involving individual voices needs to be highlighted. She asks, what was the human environment, the dilemmas and the racist compulsions making transnational experiences in the British Empire so poignant? Analysing both the opinions of civil servants on appellants’ statements of hardship and requests for financial help, and the voices of the appellants themselves, this book aims to rediscover black people’s hidden heritage.

African American Troops in World War II (Elite #158)

by Alexander Bielakowski

About half a million African Americans served overseas during World War II, almost all in segregated second-line units. This artificially limited their potential contribution, but their work especially along the logistic lifelines of the fighting divisions was vital. This book summarizes the service of these men and women; and it also focuses on the small proportion who, remarkably, overcame prejudicial barriers to reach the battlefields in combat units of the US forces and Coast Guard. Their story is illustrated with wartime photographs, and color plates including portraits of the most outstanding African Americans, the true heirs of the old “Buffalo Soldiers.”

African American Troops in World War II (Elite)

by Raffaele Ruggeri Alexander Bielakowski

About half a million African Americans served overseas during World War II, almost all in segregated second-line units. This artificially limited their potential contribution, but their work especially along the logistic lifelines of the fighting divisions was vital. This book summarizes the service of these men and women; and it also focuses on the small proportion who, remarkably, overcame prejudicial barriers to reach the battlefields in combat units of the US forces and Coast Guard. Their story is illustrated with wartime photographs, and color plates including portraits of the most outstanding African Americans, the true heirs of the old "Buffalo Soldiers.†?

African American Soldier in the Civil War: USCT 1862–66 (Warrior #114)

by Peter Dennis Mark Lardas

Approximately 200,000 African Americans fought for the Union during the Civil War. Initially, many white soldiers doubted their bravery and skill; they were soon proved wrong. The United States Colored Troops performed countless acts of courage, most famously at the battle of Fort Wagner where the 54th Massachusetts marched forth and scaled the parapets, only to be driven back in fierce hand-to-hand combat. Through fascinating first-hand accounts, this title examines the journey of the African American from slave to soldier to free man, ultimately providing a fascinating insight into the impact that these brave men had on the war and how it influenced their lives thereafter.

Refine Search

Showing 16,176 through 16,200 of 16,447 results