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The Film Novelist: Writing a Screenplay and Short Novel in 15 Weeks

by Dennis J. Packard

The Film Novelist is the first primer on writing film novels- whether you are a beginning novelist, a seasoned writer wanting to cross over into script/novel writing, or a creative writing teacher looking for proven ways to launch new writers. So, what is the difference between a screenplay and a film novel? Screenplays indicate solely what the audience is to see or hear on screen. Film novels are short, and take about as long to read as a feature film takes to watch. The description, dialogue, and narration of a film novel can simply be lifted out and used as the description, dialogue, and voice-over narration for a script. The author has devised a fifteen week program starting from a one-sentence pitch to the novel itself, which includes filming a scene from your script/novel. He grounds the discussion of early film novels, like The Maltese Falcon, Of Mice and Men, and The Misfits, to provide historical and theoretical background while detailing the practical, sequential approach for completing a short novel and script.

Framing Pictures: Film and the Visual Arts (Edinburgh Studies in Film and Intermediality (PDF))

by Steven Jacobs

Through the feature films and documentaries of directors including Emmer, Erice, Godard, Hitchcock, Pasolini, Resnais, Rossellini and Storck, Jacobs examines the way films 'animate' artworks by means of cinematic techniques, such as camera movements and editing, or by integrating them into a narrative. He explores how this 'mobilization' of the artwork is brought into play in art documentaries and artist biopics, as well as in feature films containing key scenes situated in museums. The tension between stasis and movement is also discussed in relation to modernist cinema, which often includes tableaux vivants combining pictorial, sculptural and theatrical elements. This tension also marks the aesthetics of the film still, which have inspired prominent art photographers such as Cindy Sherman and Jeff Wall. Illustrated throughout, Jacobs' study of the presence of art in film, alongside the omnipresence of the filmic image in today's art museums, is an engaging work for students and scholars of film and art alike.

Fred: The Definitive Biography Of Fred Dibnah

by David Hall

Fred Dibnah's World celebrates the life and work of Britain's best known steeplejack and national treasure, Fred Dibnhah. Before his death in 2004, Fred presented many popular series, including Magnificent Monuments, The Age of Steam and Made in Britain, all of which attracted viewers in their millions.Fred is the companion to the 12-part BBC2 series celebrating the life of this great man, which combines highlights from some of Dibnah's classic programmes with previously unseen footage. The book can of course go much further than the series, including an extraordinarily account of Fred's childhood which evokes a lost England and our great industrial heritage. Fred's passion for the glories of the Victorian age and his fascination with the landscape he grew up in, plus his admiration for the craftsmen and labourers who made it all possible, captivate us on every page. Fred is the personification of everything that made England great in the first place. And this is a glorious tribute to a man whom millions came to love.

Freddie Mercury: The biography

by Laura Jackson

**THE DEFINITIVE, UP-TO-DATE BIOGRAPHY OF FREDDIE MERCURY**'An outstanding biography. . .a fitting testament to the creative genius' -- Daily Mail'Touches all manner of intriguing rock 'n' roll debauchery. . .fascinating reading' -- Time OutThis fascinating biography of Freddie Mercury has received outstanding acclaim from Queen and rock fans worldwide -- now revised and updated to coincide with the release of the film about his life, Bohemian Rhapsody.Born Farrokh Bulsara on the island of Zanzibar, Freddie Mercury rose to worldwide stardom as the lead singer of Britain's biggest music act of all time. In this bestselling biography, Laura Jackson reveals the reality behind Queen's flamboyant frontman and lead singer, as she looks behind his unique brand of showmanship to discover who Freddie Mercury really was. Featuring exclusive interviews with some of those closest to Freddie right up until his tragic death, original Queen members and many others -- including new and intimate stories from Tim Rice, Richard Branson, Cliff Richard, Bruce Dickinson, Mike Moran, Wayne Eagling, Zandra Rhodes and Susannah York -- this is the definitive biography of one of rock's greatest legends.

From Coal Dust to Stardust

by Gary Cockerill

As Britain's most successful and high profile make-up artist, for the past 15 years Gary Cockerill has glossed the lips, curled the lashes and shared the secrets of the famous and fabulous.

The Girl I Left Behind Me

by Jessica Walker Neil Bartlett

‘... I’m sure I’m not the only one who’s thinking; hang on a minute; “I seem to have the knack of pleasing ladies.” In trousers? With short hair? In public? Was that allowed? Indeed it was.’A cool and contemporary look at one of the most intriguing aspects of musical theatre – just what is it that makes a woman in trousers so appealing? Accompanied by a piano, mezzo-soprano Jessica Walker dons a few well-chosen items of male attire, giving a supremely well-sung performance that conjures up an entire world, from the swaggering cross-dressers of the Victorian Music Hall to the ambiguous boy-heroes of Mozart and Strauss, to the back-room bulldykes of the Harlem Renaissance. Commissioned and produced by Opera North Projects with the Southbank Centre touring partner Welcome to Yorkshire. The Girl I Left Behind Me is a provocative, flirtatious, personal one woman-guide which deliciously recalls a forgotten chapter of female performance.The Girl I Left Behind Me was performed at The Barbican Centre in November 2011 as part of the Bite Season.

Give Me the Money and I'll Shoot!: Finance your Factual TV/Film Project

by Nicola Lees

The must-have guide traditional and emerging TV funding models and the creative new funding methods that are being developed and exploited by social media-savvy documentary filmmakers. Each chapter covers a different form of funding and combines advice from industry insiders - producers, buyers, specialist media agencies and corporate funding bodies - and entertaining case studies that illustrate the benefits and pitfalls of each method. With practical tips, case studies and advice it reveals what grantors, brands and NGOs are looking for in a pitch (they all have different needs and expectations), and the cultural differences that can trip up the unwary producer.Funding examples range from blue-chip TV documentaries, such as Planet Earth, which was co-funded by the BBC, Discovery NHK and CBC to The TV Book Club (More 4), which is funded by Specsavers opticians; from Lemonade Movie, which harnessed the power of Twitter to source free equipment and post-production resources etc.Readers discover:1. The difference between co-productions, pre-sales and acquisitions;2. How to develop and pitch advertiser funded programming;3. The new rules on UK product placement4. Where to hunt for foundation and grant funding and how to fill in those fiendish application forms;5. The power of crowd-funding and how to harness the internet to help you fundraise;6. How to sniff out grants and funds held in non-film focused organisations such as the Wellcome Trust;7. Why corporations are keen to fund your documentary and how to get them to part with their money without giving up your editorial control;

Glitter

by Kate Maryon

Liberty’s family is super-rich but when her dad loses his job, she has to learn that not all that glitters is gold…A sparkling novel from the author of SHINE.

Gogol's Government Inspector (PDF)

by David Harrower

The news that a government inspector is due to arrive in a small Russian town sends its bureaucrats into a panicked frenzy. A simple case of mistaken identity exposes the hypocrisy and corruption at the heart of the town in this biting moral satire. David Harrower's version of Nikolai Gogol's Government Inspector premiered at the Warwick Arts Centre in May 2011 and transferred to Young Vic, London in June.

Going Off Alarming: The Autobiography: Vol 2

by Danny Baker

The dazzlingly funny second volume of Danny Baker's memoirs: the television years.Since my first book was published I have had countless friends and family members get in touch to say how come I hadn't included this story or that tale. Was I ashamed of being shot twice, once up the arse, in Jamaica Road? How long should a man live with such a secret? If by retrospectively dropping my trousers every few pages I can reveal a fuller picture of myself during these years, then so be it.Besides. Being shot up the arse. In front of your mates.What else did I forget?

The Golden Dragon

by David Tushingham Roland Schimmelpfennig

Number 6: Thai soup with chicken, coconut milk, Thai ginger, tomatoes, button mushrooms, lemon grass and lemon leaves (hot). On a typical evening, anywhere in Europe, you walk into your local Thai/Chinese/Vietnamese restaurant, and the whole world is there. Everyone connected to everyone else, through this one place... The Golden Dragon is a funny and theatrical fable of modern life and migration, whisking you from your local takeaway to East Asia and back, revealing what really goes into that bowl of spicy soup. Are you hungry yet?

Good Morning Nantwich: Adventures In Breakfast Radio

by Phill Jupitus

What possesses a right-minded comedian to quit the day job for life as a breakfast radio DJ?

The Good, The Bad and The Multiplex: What's Wrong With Modern Movies?

by Mark Kermode

If blockbusters make money no matter how bad they are, then why not make a good one for a change?How can 3-D be the future of cinema when it's been giving audiences a headache for over a hundred years? Why pay to watch films in cinemas that don't have a projectionist but do have a fast-food stand? And, in a world where Sex and the City 2 was a hit, what are film critics even for? Outspoken, opinionated and hilariously funny, The Good, The Bad and The Multiplex is a must for anyone who has ever sat in an undermanned, overpriced cinema and wondered: 'How the hell did things get to be this terrible?'

Gossip Boys: The double unauthorised biography of Ed Westwick and Chace Crawford

by Liz Kaye

OMG. It's Chuck Bass and Nate Archibald from Gossip Girl in one book. We're all mad about the boys, but is it Ed Westwick's bad-guy allure that ticks your box, or Chace Crawford's pretty-boy looks? Or - naughty - both? Well, to help you decide, Gossip Boys, the unauthorised double biography of Chace and Ed, charts the lives of these hot young things, who are best friends both on the show and in real life. Brit-born Westwick has the edgy cool of his character, having fronted the indie band The Filthy Youth, and appearing in cult films such as Son of Rambow and Children of Men. Crawford meanwhile is the ultimate all-American idol, signed by the first talent agent who interviewed him and being named 'Summer's Hottest Bachelor' by People and winning the Teen Choice Award for 'Male Hottie'. The huge success of Gossip Girl has seen these actors become two of the biggest pin-ups around, and favourites of magazines like Grazia and teen TV programming such as T4. Now you can learn all about the boys: their early days, their flames old and new, their careers and the bromance that has made them scorching stars.

Great Lengths: Seven Works of Marathon Theater

by Jonathan Kalb

We know that size matters in many areas of human endeavor, but what about works of the imagination? Why do some dramatic creations extend to five hours or more, and how does their extreme length help them accomplish extraordinarily ambitious aims? In Great Lengths, theater critic and scholar Jonathan Kalb addresses these and other questions through a close look at seven internationally prominent theater productions, including Tony Kushner's Angels in America, Robert Wilson's Einstein on the Beach, the Royal Shakespeare Company's Nicholas Nickleby, and the "durational works" of the British experimental company Forced Entertainment. This is a book about extreme length, monumental scope, and intensive immersion in the theater in general, written by a passionate spectator reflecting on selected pinnacles of his theatergoing over thirty years. The book's examples, deliberately chosen for their diversity, range from adapted novels and epics, to dramatic chronicles with macrohistorical and macropolitical implications, to stagings of super-size classic plays, to "postdramatic" works that negotiate the border between life and art. Kalb reconstructs each of the works, re-creating the experience of seeing it while at the same time explaining how it maintained attention and interest over so many hours, and then expanding the scope to embrace a wider view and ask broader questions. The discussion of Nicholas Nickleby, for example, considers melodrama as a basic tool of theatrical communication, and the section on Peter Brook's The Mahabharata explores the ethical problems surrounding theatrical exoticism. The chapter on Einstein on the Beach grows into a reflection on the media-age status of the much-debated Gesamtkunstwerk (or "total artwork") and a reassessment of the long avant-gardist tradition of challenging the primacy of rational language in theater. The essay on Peter Stein's Faust I + II becomes a reflection on the interpretive role of theater directors and the theatrical viability of antitheatrical closet drama. Great Lengths thus offers a remarkable panorama of the surprisingly broad field of contemporary marathon theater—an art form that diverse audiences of savvy, screen-weaned spectators continue to seek out, for the increasingly rare experiences of awe, transcendence, and sustained immersion that it provides. Great Lengths will appeal to general readers as well as theater specialists. It situates the chosen productions in various historical and critical contexts and engages with the many lively scholarly debates that have swirled around them. At the same time, it uses the productions as springboards for wide-ranging reflections on the basic purpose and enduring power of theater in an attention-challenged, media-saturated era.

Gypsy Bride: One girl's true story of falling in love with a gypsy boy

by Sam Skye Lee

'I felt like Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Snow White and all the other fairy-tale princesses, and Pat was my Prince Charming.'Sam Skye Lee had often thought about getting married, but never imagined that her dress would be bright pink with flashing lights and weigh a staggering 20-stone. But then she didn't count on having a gypsy wedding...It's rare for a 'gorger', or non-traveller, to marry into the gypsy community. But after a shocking childhood tragedy, Sam found the comfort she needed from an unxpected source - Patrick and his family of travellers.Gypsy Bride is the heartwarming true story of how an ordinary girl finds herself discovering an extraordinary world. A place where 'grabbing' is a sign a boy fancies you, six-year-olds get spray tans, and christenings, weddings and funerals are jaw-droppingly flamboyant.This love story is more than boy meets girl. It's about a girl who falls in love with a whole race of people and their wonderful ways.

Heinemann Active Maths, Level 1, Pupil Book 6: Shape, Position and Movement (PDF)

by Steve Mills Lynda Keith Hilary Koll

These bright and lively pupil books have been designed to further consolidate children's learning through independent practice. They are closely linked to the teacher activity cards and each 'Heinemann Active Maths' outcome.

The Hen Night Epiphany

by Jimmy Murphy

Should some secrets never be kept no matter what the cost? Five women come together to help clear out a run-down cottage a week before the wedding of its new owner, Una. Joining her on this hen night of sorts are her two best friends, Kelly and Triona, her soon to be mother-in-law, Olive, and Olive’s best friend, Anta. But Una is keeping a secret that, if revealed, will destroy all hopes of her dream wedding and living happily ever after with the love ofher life. As the play unfolds we see the women, one by one, forced to confront awkward truths of their own.

Heritage Film Audiences: Period Films and Contemporary Audiences in the UK

by Claire Monk

The concept of 'heritage cinema' is now firmly established as an influential - as well as much-debated and contested - critical framework for the discussion of period or historical representation in film, most prominently with reference to British heritage and post-heritage film successes since the 1980s, but also to comparable examples from Europe, North America and beyond. These successes have ranged from Merchant Ivory's A Room with a View, Maurice, Howards End and The Remains of the Day, via Jane Austen adaptations such as Ang Lee's Sense and Sensibility to post-heritage adaptations such as Sally Potter's Orlando. Yet the very idea of the heritage film has rested on untested assumptions about its audiences. This book breaks significant new ground in the scholarship on contemporary period films, and makes a distinctive new contribution to the growing field of film-audience studies, by presenting the first empirically based study of the audiences for quality period films. Monk engages directly with two highly contrasting sections of these audiences, surveyed in the UK in the late 1990s, to explore their identities, their wider patterns of film taste, and above all their attitudes and pleasures - in relation to the period films they enjoy and on issues central to debates around the heritage film, literary adaptation and cultural value - with illuminating and unpredicted results.

History and Film: Moving Pictures and the Study of the Past

by Maarten Pereboom

The ability to view recorded moving pictures has had a major impact on human culture since the development of the necessary technologies over a century ago. For most of this time people have gone to the movies to be entertained and perhaps edified, but in the meantime television, the videocassette recorder (VCR), the digital versatile disk (DVD) player, the personal computer (desktop and laptop), the internet and other technologies have made watching moving pictures possible at home, in the classroom and just about anywhere else. Today, moving images are everywhere in our culture. Every day, moving picture cameras record millions of hours of activity, human and otherwise, all over the world: your cell phone makes a little video of your friends at a party; the surveillance camera at the bank keeps on eye on customers; journalists’ shoulder-carried cameras record the latest from the war zone; and across the world film artists work on all kinds of movies, from low-budget independent projects to the next big-budget Hollywood blockbuster. Moving pictures have had a great influence on human culture, and this book focuses on using moving images as historical evidence. Studying history means examining evidence from the past to understand, interpret and present what has happened in different times and places. We talk and write about what we have learned, hoping to establish credibility both for what we have determined to be the facts and for whatever meaning or significance we may attach to our reconstruction of the past. Studying history is a scientific process, involving a fairly set methodology. We tend to favor written sources, and we have tended to favor writing as a means of presenting our views of the past. But historians also use all kinds of other documents and artifacts in their work of interpreting the past, including moving pictures.

History and Film: Moving Pictures and the Study of the Past

by Maarten Pereboom

The ability to view recorded moving pictures has had a major impact on human culture since the development of the necessary technologies over a century ago. For most of this time people have gone to the movies to be entertained and perhaps edified, but in the meantime television, the videocassette recorder (VCR), the digital versatile disk (DVD) player, the personal computer (desktop and laptop), the internet and other technologies have made watching moving pictures possible at home, in the classroom and just about anywhere else. Today, moving images are everywhere in our culture. Every day, moving picture cameras record millions of hours of activity, human and otherwise, all over the world: your cell phone makes a little video of your friends at a party; the surveillance camera at the bank keeps on eye on customers; journalists’ shoulder-carried cameras record the latest from the war zone; and across the world film artists work on all kinds of movies, from low-budget independent projects to the next big-budget Hollywood blockbuster. Moving pictures have had a great influence on human culture, and this book focuses on using moving images as historical evidence. Studying history means examining evidence from the past to understand, interpret and present what has happened in different times and places. We talk and write about what we have learned, hoping to establish credibility both for what we have determined to be the facts and for whatever meaning or significance we may attach to our reconstruction of the past. Studying history is a scientific process, involving a fairly set methodology. We tend to favor written sources, and we have tended to favor writing as a means of presenting our views of the past. But historians also use all kinds of other documents and artifacts in their work of interpreting the past, including moving pictures.

Hitchcock and the Cinema of Sensations: Embodied Film Theory and Cinematic Reception (International Library of Visual Culture)

by Paul Elliott

What happens to us when we 'see' a film? For the experience of what we see on screen draws as much upon the non-visual senses as it does on sight. In the first full-length analysis of the concept of embodied film theory, Paul Elliott charts the development of a 'cinema of sensations' - examining how cinema audiences use their corporeal selves and sensual memory to quite literally flesh out what they see on screen.Through the prism of Alfred Hitchcock's films, Elliott reveals how the body's sensations have a vital place in cinematic reception and the study of film: demonstrated here through the trope of nausea in Frenzy, pollution and smell in Shadow of a Doubt, physical sound reception in the Psycho shower scene and the importance of corporeality and closeness in Rear Window. He traces the way in which conceptual tools such as haptic vision, synaesthesia, physical sound reception and the aesthesiological body have been employed by film theorists and philosophers to better understand the processes inherent in the cinematic experience. He argues that the trend towards a sensually-based theoretical framework for film is indicative of a wider trend in visual thinking that is, in turn, linked to epistemological shifts and transformations in the way we situate ourselves in the world.Hitchcock and the Cinema of Sensations rethinks the body in the ci nema seat, seeing it not as a fleshy, insentient shell for the mind and eye but a feeling, thinking, evanescent site of sensation, memory and knowledge. The book provides a thoroughly new take on Hitchcock's classic films in order to demonstrate how taste, smell, hearing and touch can provide us with a corporeal level of understanding that sometimes compliments, sometimes clashes, with our more cognitive capabilities in the reception of film. This is essential reading for scholars and students of film studies, cultural theory and philosophy.

Holly and the Silver Unicorn: Holly And The Silver Unicorn (Magic Ballerina #14)

by Darcey Bussell

Return to the magical world of Enchantia in the captivating third series of Magic Ballerina by Darcey Bussell!

Hollywood Film 1963-1976: Years of Revolution and Reaction

by Drew Casper

Hollywood 1963-1976 chronicles the upheaval and innovation that took place in the American film industry during an era of pervasive cultural tumult. Exploring the many ideologies embraced by an increasingly diverse Hollywood, Casper offers a comprehensive canon, covering the period's classics as well as its brilliant but overlooked masterpieces. A broad overview and analysis of one of American film's most important and innovative periods Offers a new, more expansive take on the accepted canon of the era Includes films expressing ideologies contrary to the misremembered leftist slant Explores and fully contextualizes the dominant genres of the 60s and 70s

Hollywood Film 1963-1976: Years of Revolution and Reaction

by Drew Casper

Hollywood 1963-1976 chronicles the upheaval and innovation that took place in the American film industry during an era of pervasive cultural tumult. Exploring the many ideologies embraced by an increasingly diverse Hollywood, Casper offers a comprehensive canon, covering the period's classics as well as its brilliant but overlooked masterpieces. A broad overview and analysis of one of American film's most important and innovative periods Offers a new, more expansive take on the accepted canon of the era Includes films expressing ideologies contrary to the misremembered leftist slant Explores and fully contextualizes the dominant genres of the 60s and 70s

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